Taurus Firearm Forum banner

1 - 20 of 41 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
612 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Ok help me out on this..
Fired my M4 first time yesterday.. Excellent btw, thanks for asking.
Im going to state my cleaning procedure and then my problem. Please tell me if you spot any errors. Thanks.

I run a patch of soaked hoppes solvent down the tube. Use the breach brush then the bore brush and then typically run one more patch of solvent down the barrel again, just to help pick up any crud and make it slick again then run my dry patches.
I went through about 20 dry patches and there's still black on the patch... now what the heck?

I push the patch and rod through in one run.. attach a new patch and run the thing through again.. so no pulling the rod back out through the breech. I also wipe my rod off every run.. WHY do i go through 10 -20 patches and still see some black fouling on my patches..? I mean c'mon! I solvent. brush and wipe.. I don't see why I can't get it clean. I thought maybe I was picking the black up when I was running it through.. hitting the sides before entering the breech.. NOPE! the fouling is from inside. How dirty is this damn thing..
I was thinking about taking it to were I bought it and having them clean it once..
what do you guys think about all this above?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,505 Posts
Gotta scrub the chamber too and if it's a direct gas system hit the gas tube with a pipe cleaner. Then what you should invest in is some foaming bore cleaner and let it soak for a good time in the barrel. After that you can use a swab with solvent and you will use less patches. But the barrel is just one aspect of cleaning an AR download or buy the m-16 military maintainance manual. The bolt carrier group needs a TLC as well. Plus it will help you keep an eye on the parts that may need to be replaced. Take heart my friend, AR's are one of the easiest rifles to work on, and there is literally a ton of info and parts on them to keep your new toy shooting for a long time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,146 Posts
Question new to you used or new to you new? If used there may be build up from previous owner. And what Ace said.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29,933 Posts
gotta scrub the chamber too and if it's a direct gas system hit the gas tube with a pipe cleaner. Then what you should invest in is some foaming bore cleaner and let it soak for a good time in the barrel. After that you can use a swab with solvent and you will use less patches. But the barrel is just one aspect of cleaning an ar download or buy the m-16 military maintainance manual. The bolt carrier group needs a tlc as well. Plus it will help you keep an eye on the parts that may need to be replaced. Take heart my friend, ar's are one of the easiest rifles to work on, and there is literally a ton of info and parts on them to keep your new toy shooting for a long time.

ditto...
:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
612 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
new to me new.. yea I put allot of love into the carrier assembly. and the gass tube. Ill go get some foaming bore cleaner this minute..
The rifle came with a general maintenance / assembly booklet. Thanks for the tips. I'll let you know what turns up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,348 Posts
I'm with DR -- the JB stuff works great -- you should see what it did with the barrel of a new to me muzzleloader. The previous owner hadn't taken very good care of it and it was a mess. If you live anywhere close to a Scheel's Sporting Goods you can buy it off the shelf, or simply order a jar from Brownells.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,779 Posts
The metal has pores in it. The solvent attacks the surface of the deposits. Leaving it sit longer, but not long enough for it to evaporate, will enable the deposits to be penetrated more deeply. The deposits in a direct gas impingement rifle will also be subjected to more heat, baking the deposits, and making it harder for a solvent to loosen them.

You may also want to use a dedicated copper solvent, as copper fouling can cover other deposits. Once the bore is clean, it will respond to further cleaning much more quickly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
570 Posts
Does your M-4 have a chrome lined barrel ?

They are much easier to get squeaky clean.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,331 Posts
I've got a different way to clean long guns. I've got a bluing tank that's about 36" long, and I put four gallons of diesel or kerosene in it. I submerse the whole barrel assembly and let it soak for thirty or forty minutes. Then I go scrub the crap out of it with a bore brush and a chamber brush, and then I start with the patches. I got the idea from the solvent filled horizontal cut-in-half drums we used to clean machineguns in the army. Doling out the solvent with an eyedropper just takes a lot longer. For pistols (all metal) I use a cookie tin - like Christmas cookies come in. I solder the seams so they won't leak, and do the same soak and scrub. It's a lot easier. And as far as kerosene as a solvent - Hoppe's #9 is mostly kerosene, and I quit buying Hoppe's when I discovered that. I can get a whole gallon of kerosene for what a little bottle of Hoppe's costs.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
10,379 Posts
That's a helluvan idea db, made me remember I've got an old broken down parts washing tub that would do that trick perfectly.

Woohoo! I learned something today, so it can't be a completely wasted day can it?<g>
 
  • Like
Reactions: dbeardslee

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,331 Posts
Just don't leave it in toooooo long. Years ago I dropped a 1911 in to soak, and promptly forgot about it. Eighteen months later when I remembered I found it had removed the bluing. :eek: But what the heck - I wanted a black 1911 anyway, and it gave me an excuse to refinish it. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,146 Posts
Bore snakes are a blessing also, if you never used one try it and see what you think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,331 Posts
And another little trick for handguns - I keep a jar of kerosene on my work bench, and when I clean polymer pistols I take the barrel and first scrub it out with simple green and hot water - just to get the big stuff out. Then I dry it good, and drop the barrel and the small metal parts in the jar. I let them soak while I work on the rest of the pistol, and the barrel is always the last thing I take out so it has the longest soak. I use a little telescopic magnet to retrieve the parts which works pretty good.

The thing that's nice about using the bluing tank on long guns is that I hold the muzzle down in the solution and run my brush through from the chamber end. Every time it pokes out the muzzle the brush gets reloaded with kerosene and I pull it back through. It's just way, way faster. I use a filter when I pour the kerosene (or diesel) back into the gas can to get the crud out, and I've been using the same five gallons of diesel for about fifteen years now. Still works, too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,146 Posts
On the parts cleaning tanks if you put a old piece of air hose in it and regulate the air to a slow but vigorous constant bubble in the bottom of the tank the agitation cleans and does most of the work for you. We would do this with engine parts that were gunked up and had baked on grease, oil, and who knows what in them and on them and they would come out sparkling clean in a few hours. As said above you my only want to leave it for a half to three quarters of an hour.
 
  • Like
Reactions: dbeardslee

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,331 Posts
On the parts cleaning tanks if you put a old piece of air hose in it and regulate the air to a slow but vigorous constant bubble in the bottom of the tank the agitation cleans and does most of the work for you. We would do this with engine parts that were gunked up and had baked on grease, oil, and who knows what in them and on them and they would come out sparkling clean in a few hours. As said above you my only want to leave it for a half to three quarters of an hour.
That sounds a lot like the same principle a sonic cleaner works on. I like it!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,006 Posts
...and if it's a direct gas system hit the gas tube with a pipe cleaner.
Respectfully, don't do this.

The gas system is self-cleaning. Removing the gas tube is unnecessary and may lead to early wear of the hole in which the pin sits that secures the tube.

I've owned AR rifles for 10+ years. I took the gas tube out of one of my oldest rifles, the one with thousands of rounds down the barrel, and pipe-cleanered it out. It was nearly clean.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jc85

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,006 Posts
Just don't leave it in toooooo long. Years ago I dropped a 1911 in to soak, and promptly forgot about it. Eighteen months later when I remembered I found it had removed the bluing. :eek: But what the heck - I wanted a black 1911 anyway, and it gave me an excuse to refinish it. :D
Dude, wait - whut? You've got so many 1911s you actually forgot about one? What, do you run an arms museum or something?
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
10,379 Posts
LoL I hear ya on the bluing...which is why I'll probably only throw the stainless parts and the barrels into the mix, for the rifles and shotguns...well...I've been needing to reblue em anyways.

Yep, mine has an agitator...just not sure if it still works<g>. I forgot to dump the "eco safe" cleaning (meaning...super expensive...works for chit) crap out, WI winter hit and everything froze. To be honest I haven't plugged the stupid thing in in over 2 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,331 Posts
Dude, wait - whut? You've got so many 1911s you actually forgot about one? What, do you run an arms museum or something?
Back then I think I had 26 handguns, so yeah - they got away from me every now and then. Plus I was young and had other things occupying my attention. ;):D
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
Top