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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Something has long puzzled me. Given Newtonian physics, wouldn't it make sense to accelerate the spin of bullets more evenly? With computerized tooling you could vary the pitch of rifling from throat to crown so that the bullet would spin up in an optimal fashion.
I realize that the bullet is also accelerating at the same time, but figuring out the comparative rates is what computers are good for.
This would, of course, mean that it would be preferable to tune everything - powder, bullet, and barrel to achieve optimal results.
It seems to me that the payoff might well be worth it.
So, the question is... has anyone tried this?
 

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Slowly, computers are coming more into use as data collectors in firearms. In the case of the CheyTac Intervention series of sniper rifles, they have a ballistics computer that helps predict the effects of the environment on the projectile and give simple instructions to the user based on ditance, windspeed, projectile velocity, elevation, and a number of other factors. It's a pretty big step, though not quite what you're talking about as far as rifling and spinup on a round. I would think the biggest problem with it isn't so much the firearm, but the ammunition balance. Just the tiniest air bubble in the center of a lead ball can make a huge difference on how fast and flat the projectile will fly. If there was a way to mass produce the ammo with as little inconsistency as possible, there may be hope for better rifling designs using computer calculations and design.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

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Wouldn't you still have to stabilize the speed of the bullet before it left the barrel?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Wouldn't you still have to stabilize the speed of the bullet before it left the barrel?
Nope - the bullet's still spinning, the rates of acceleration, both longitudinal and angular will be different - would be optimized for a specific load.
 

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If I understand you right, then any change in your load or bullet weight will result in a different rate of twist. Because the you are essentially accelerating the twist through the barrel. If you do not stabilize twist rate prior to the bullet leaving the barrel, then that twist rate will accelerate either higher or lower due than your target with any change in load data. Or do I misunderstand your idea?
 

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Spin rate of the bullet would NOT accelerate, after the bullet leaves the barrel. The bullet always loses energy and slows (in both velocity and spin rate), beginning as soon as net energy input stops. Regardless of the rifling rate, as soon as the bullet leaves the muzzle, the barrel no longer has any effect on it - and it immediately begins slowing down and losing spin rate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Spin rate of the bullet would NOT accelerate, after the bullet leaves the barrel. The bullet always loses energy and slows (in both velocity and spin rate), beginning as soon as net energy input stops. Regardless of the rifling rate, as soon as the bullet leaves the muzzle, the barrel no longer has any effect on it - and it immediately begins slowing down and losing spin rate.
Of course - we're discussing interior ballistics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If I understand you right, then any change in your load or bullet weight will result in a different rate of twist. Because the you are essentially accelerating the twist through the barrel. If you do not stabilize twist rate prior to the bullet leaving the barrel, then that twist rate will accelerate either higher or lower due than your target with any change in load data. Or do I misunderstand your idea?
Yeah, the barrel would be heavily optimized for one load.
 

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I don't think I would be interested in a barrel that only worked well for one load.
 

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"Gain Twist" rifling has been around a long time.

The Italians used it in their 6.5mm Manlicher-Carcano rifles, of Lee Harvey Oswald fame.

I have one thst was made in 1936.

They don't work any better than conventionally rifled guns.

But at least you're putting all that hops and barley to good use...;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
"Gain Twist" rifling has been around a long time.

The Italians used it in their 6.5mm Manlicher-Carcano rifles, of Lee Harvey Oswald fame.

I have one thst was made in 1936.

They don't work any better than conventionally rifled guns.

But at least you're putting all that hops and barley to good use...;)
1936? Next you'll be telling me that Browning invented it! :D
 

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You know, last night I was watching an episode of "Triggers" on the Military Channel and the showed a Driggs-Schroeder 1 pounder naval cannon on a wheeled carriage that they were firing. The guy that was presenting the gun mentioned that it had gain-twist rifling. Back in the 1890s no less.

I never had any idea. :cool:

Reportedly a anti-torpedo boat gun.
American Ships - The World of 1898: The Spanish-American War (Hispanic Division, Library of Congress)
http://www.loc.gov/rr/hispanic/1898/img/helenawp2.jpg "#3: Detail of a Driggs-Schroeder rapid-fire gun on board the U.S.S. Helena. This rapid-fire gun was capable of firing 20 shells a minute and thus was key weapon in the destruction of Spanish Admirals Montojo and Cervera's fleets."
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
You know, last night I was watching an episode of "Triggers" on the Military Channel and the showed a Driggs-Schroeder 1 pounder naval cannon on a wheeled carriage that they were firing. The guy that was presenting the gun mentioned that it had gain-twist rifling. Back in the 1890s no less.

I never had any idea. :cool:

Reportedly a anti-torpedo boat gun.
American Ships - The World of 1898: The Spanish-American War (Hispanic Division, Library of Congress)
http://www.loc.gov/rr/hispanic/1898/img/helenawp2.jpg "#3: Detail of a Driggs-Schroeder rapid-fire gun on board the U.S.S. Helena. This rapid-fire gun was capable of firing 20 shells a minute and thus was key weapon in the destruction of Spanish Admirals Montojo and Cervera's fleets."
I saw that, too. :) It was an excellent show. And the comment about gain twist rifling caught my ear as well.
 
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