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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, there. I'm new to all of this, so please bare with me.
I recently purchased a Millenium Pro .40 and need to get some ammo.
So, assuming i can actually find some, what should i go with?
Brands to go with, brands to avoid?
I'd like to keep it as cheap as possible, i am mostly going to be taking it out to get used to it and improve my aim. I want to be comfortable with it before getting my CHL

Also, are there any accesories that i really should get? I know i need to get a cleaning kit before i go use it, but what else?

Thanks !
 

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1 - find ammo.
2 - see what shoots consistently and accurately from your gun, shoot all that you can drop the ones that give you any trouble
3 - SD/HD ammo - most of today's jhps work well - find 1 or 2 that are 100% reliable and keep them in stock!

Have fun on the trip!

Tip: Federal JHP is currently available here >> Firearms, Guns, Rifles. Grain Valley, Missouri. 155 &180 are in stock at $26 a box of 50.
I have worked with Mark - the owner for some time. He will restock FMJ soon and it will also disappear SOON.
His prices are fair. Not everybody know his business and he is not in the ammo search engines.
 
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Welcome aboard from Florida the "GunShine" state. :icon_ lala:

State of over "1 MILLION 120 THOUSAND" Concealed Carry Licenses and counting!

Keep in mind there are no "Magic Bullets" so don't fall into that trap.

Carry what you shoot the best in your particular gun. Which means you'll have to test drive a few to find that out.

With the present low ammo availability, I'd go with a "known" reliable profile and pick whatever economy priced full metal jacketed rounds I could find. When more JHP's become available you continue your test driving.
 

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Step 1: Find Ammon
Step 2: shoot what you can find
Step 3: Pick what is 100% reliable and stick to it.

There are certain brands that are obviously "dirtier" than other loads, or may have certain characteristics you may not like. I try not to shoot steel casings, but beggers can't be choosers in the current market. Just remember that the first few hunder rounds are breakin, so if your gun doesn't shoot a particular brand well at the beginning, you can try it later it may have different results.

WWB (Winchester White Box) is usually pretty cheap at Wally World. They usually have .40 in stock around me (not much else).
 

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I use a majority of WWB 165 gr. and UMC 180gr. in my .40's both FMJ for range and have been economical (this week 250rd Mega pack UMC $87+Tax at Wally World). For HD use WWB 180gr. JHP Personal Protection Series - but haven't seen any on shelf recently - these are very economical when compared with all the "fancy" SD ammo and were running about $26 for box of 50 and has fed well in all my .40's. I've used most brands of ammo and only had some problems with Federal Champions.

Good luck on finding any ammo.
 

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In theory, they should all work, in practice, they don't. There's nothing unsafe as long as it's marked .40 S&W. So shoot what you can find and see if it works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the info. I'm pretty sure i will end up going with whatever i can get my hands on. A few academy sports and walmarts in the area.
 

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check your local walmarts daily on line. have gotten lucky that way. :thumb:
 

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What they said! I also rip the end off the box of ammo and write down if I had any failures of any kind..and how many rounds I fire each range trip. That way I know if I'm gonna buy that brand again. Also, if you're getting your concealed carry permit, it's a good habit to get into. If you're ever in a altercation or have to use your firearm, you're gonna want all the documentation you can get as to how proficient and familiar you are with it.. It can only help.. Shoot safe and have fun!
 

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Take your new pistola apart and clean it REAL good before you shoot it. That gunk in there is not any kind of lube it is just a shipping preservative and will cause your new pistola nothing but grief.

Chair Furniture Illustration
 

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Like gbusmech said, if you don't clean it well before you shoot it, it doesn't matter what kind of ammo you get. After that, it's just trial and error infill you find what you gun likes. If it's like my PT145, it will like anything you put in it. Enjoy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well, tried using walmart.com to see who had some in stock. It said 3 stores near me had it in stock, none actually had any.
I may end up going to Academy early in the morning. From what i hear they get shipments Mon-Wed- and Friday
 

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What they said! I also rip the end off the box of ammo and write down if I had any failures of any kind..and how many rounds I fire each range trip. That way I know if I'm gonna buy that brand again. Also, if you're getting your concealed carry permit, it's a good habit to get into. If you're ever in a altercation or have to use your firearm, you're gonna want all the documentation you can get as to how proficient and familiar you are with it.. It can only help.. Shoot safe and have fun!

Man, Why didn't I think of that! That's at great little nugget of advice right there.
 
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I posted this a couple of weeks ago, but I'll do it again. It might help. It's a bit long, so be warned.

What To Do When You Take Your New Gun Out Of The Box
I’ve been around guns all my life, and upon occasion, have even had the pleasure of buying and shooting a brand new in the box, never been fired before gun. I’ve also had the pleasure of unpacking and preparing for use a number of military weapons, which I am living testament to, are packed in the most obnoxious, gooey, sticky, slimy stuff you can imagine – cosmoline. But the latter is a story for a different paper.

I’ve spoken with friends and associates who have complained that their gun didn’t work as expected right out of the box. They experienced failure to fire, failure to eject, magazines failing to drop, slides not locking back after the last round and a host of other problems. Most of these problems can be narrowed down to the fact that the gun was not “treated” fairly prior to its first range session.

New guns come in a number of pre-fire conditions. Some are loaded down with oil, grease or other preservative “goo.” Others come packaged dryer than a popcorn fart. Most come in some condition between the two. Below are a few steps you can take to make sure that your first firing session is successful and you and your gun go home happy. Before you leave your gun shop or on the way home, stop and get a good cleaning kit. You should be able to purchase a kit for around $30. That kit is more important that even the ammo you will later purchase for the gun. In addition to the kit, get some solvent and some lube and some dry lube such as powdered graphite or Remington Dry Lube. Hoppe’s #9 is probably the most common. There are others; Gunzilla, CLP, and other stuff, but you can’t go wrong with Hoppe’s. And the smell is addicting. I think there might be some after shave or cologne which has the fragrance of Hoppe’s. Get solvent and lube and the dry lube. They are not interchangeable.

1) Take your new gun to a quiet place in your house. Open the gun case. Take the gun out and admire it. Pat yourself on the back for being a wise and astute consumer and making a wise and educated choice. Now put the gun back in the case and take out the owner’s manual. Don’t put the magazine (God forbid that you would call the thingy that holds the rounds a clip. It ain’t a clip. It has a spring and a follower. It is a magazine) into the magazine well. Don’t rack back the slide. Don’t mess with the trigger. READ THE OWNER’S MANUAL COVER TO COVER. Now, do it again. Read the parts that describe the operation, field stripping and cleaning several times. Do it again.

2) While some experts may tell you your new gun is ready to fire right out of the box, that’s a fallacy. It may be ready to fire from a mechanical standpoint, but unless you want to find out how efficient the Customer Service department is at your gun shop or at the home office of the manufacturer of your gun, you might want to follow the steps in this paper. Field strip your gun. Put it back together. Do it again. Do it again. Do it until it becomes second nature. Become one with the gun. Get real intimate with your new friend. Make sure you do this on a table in a small room if possible, with no hidden corners or carpets. Keep in mind that the famous Mr. Murphy is watching you constantly, and there are a couple of springs in your new gun which may or may not become airborne with great force, and have an innate ability to find the best hiding places when released from captivity.

3) Field strip the gun and follow the directions for cleaning in the owner’s manual. Most cleaning kits contain a toothbrush. It’s for your gun, not for your pearly white’s. Apply the solvent liberally and use the toothbrush to scrub every available surface on the slide and the frame. Your gun does not need heavy grease in order to operate. It does need light lubricant, but we’ll discuss that a little later. Take the brush which came in your kit, and is made for the bore of the caliber gun you bought. If you aren’t sure, the brush will be slight larger in diameter than the inside diameter of the barrel. Put a few drops of solvent on the brush and run the brush through the bore going from the chamber end to the muzzle end. (If you don’t know the difference, you haven’t read your owner’s manual enough times). Allow the brush to turn. It’s simply following the rifling in your barrel. This is good. Now, put the patch holder on the rod instead of the brush and put a couple of drops of solvent on the patch. Make sure the patch meets with a little resistance as you push it into the bore, again going from chamber to muzzle. Run the patch up and down the bore and make sure it emerges clean. Take a clean bore patch and spray a few drops of wet lube on it and run it up and down the bore. This will coat the bore and keep the rust away.

When you are cleaning the gun, make sure to get all of the packing grease and gunk off of the moving parts, off of the slide, off of the guide rod and springs, and pay particular attention to the firing pin hole. You can use a lint free cloth or bore patches to wipe the gun down. Once the rag or bore patch no longer picks up any grease, you should be ready to lube the gun. DO NOT OVER LUBE!!!! Most good gun lubes come with a syringe which will enable you to accurately place a drop or two of lube in tight places. If not, you need to find a container in your gun shop which has such a device. Put a drop or two of lube on the slide guides, the guide rod and springs and any place where there is metal to metal or metal to polycarbonate contact. Wipe off any excess. You can now use the spry lube and lube the trigger assembly and put a little into the firing pin recess.

4) Reassemble your gun.

5) Disassemble and clean your magazine. The mag is an integral part of your weapon system. Make sure the spring and follower are clean and there are no burrs on the feed lips at the top of the mag. A little 200 grit emery cloth can be used to remove burrs.

6) Reassemble the mag.

You should now be ready for a range session. Some folks will tell you to shoot one round then clean then shoot two round then clean again before loading a full mag into the gun. I don’t really subscribe to that school because most modern semi-automatics are built with enough interlocks and safeties so that accidental fully automatic fire is about as common as a vegan at a Bar-B-Que. But it may not be a bad idea to load 2 or 3 rounds into the mag for the first couple of shooting cycles.

There are those who will tell you that you should only clean your gun when it fails to operate properly. My suggestion is that you clean your gun after every range session, and if you carry it, once a week. But then I’m pretty anal about having a clean firearm.
 
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Thanks divebum! I have done MOST of the above, so for a penalty, i will go completely thru the steps three times as self punishment. No really that is great advice.. I did pick up the gun several times and started to clean it, but alas not as thoroughly as explained..
Penalty. Go back and do the exercises again..

Good stuff

Love the gun! Still havent shot it yet as the woman hasnt had time..
Mikey
 

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For target i been finding 180 gr american eagle at my LGS and as far as self defense ammo i use Remington golden saber's I love those rounds and they feed well in every gun I ever shot with them even ammo picky guns.
 

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These days finding a consistent ammo manufacturer is tough. In a perfect world, I'd like to find Fiocchi but it has been a long time since I've seen a box of that. I end up buying whatever I find at my first stop. If I don't find anything, I go home. Seems the 'degree of chance' of finding the ammo for your pistol starts low at 9mm and gradually increases from there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I think I Lucked out today. Local Walmart had cheap Winchester and cheap federal rounds. I got 100 in total. So far I have disassembled and cleaned the gun, and have run about 5 magazines of snap clips through it. I plan on going to the range on Saturday, and plan on repeating what I have done.
how much oil is the right amount? A thing coating is my guess
 
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