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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am fairly new to pistol shooting and have a TH9C compact 9mm pistol. I would like to know from some of you experienced shooters what is considered being reasonably accurate with a 9mm compact pistol.

One forum post I read said form a standing position with 2 hand grip you should be able to maintsin a 2” group at 25 yards and a 4” group at 50 yards. I found that pretty discouraging as with aging eyes the sights tend to be be a bit of a blur and the short sight radius does not give you a lot to work with and I doubt I will ever be able to maintain a 2” group at 25 yards.

I currenty shoot a 3” group at 5 yards which I am OK with being new to pistol shooting. With traing and practice I might be able to get that down to a 1 1/4” group at 5 yards but doubt I can get much better than that.

I am not looking to be a marksman, just a decent shot.

From what I see at the range maintaing a 2” group at 25 yards would be the exception for the majoriy of shooters, but it is a public range and my guess is a lot of shooters there are occasional shooters at best.

Just want to set some Realistic expectaions for myself.
 

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I don't know what others think but I'm comfortable shooting 1" - 1 1/2" groups at 7 yards with my 9mm Range Officer compact. This pistol may be able to shoot 2" groups at 25 yards but I'm not, and being a self defense pistol and not a target pistol it shoots perfectly fine for its intended purpose.

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The people that say you should be able to shoot 2" at 25 yd seem to never EVER post a pic of said group. I've done it a few times, but that's with my best target pistols and usually with red dots. A lot depends on your goal. If you're primarily self defense oriented, a 6" group of 10 shots in 8 seconds at 5 yards might be considered more successful than a 2" group of 10 shots in a minute. I'm about 80% bullseye and 20% self defense. Don't worry about what someone else says your goal should be. Pick one that's a little better better than you can do now, and when you make it, pick another one. If you shoot 3" at 5 yards, try for 2", or try for 3" at 7yd. In my opinion, if you're a pretty new shooter, you're already on the right track. I've seen PLENTY of people empty a whole mag at 5 or 7 yd and not put a hole in the paper.
 

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You're not going to get a 2" group RESTED at 25 with most carry sized pistols regardless of caliber. My Kel Tec impresses me with 3.5" groups which is plenty adequate for self defense. I can't shoot better'n 3" at 25 rested with my .38 snubbies and they're generally more accurate than an auto pistol.

If you can hit the center of a B27 from 15 yards off hand, you're MORE than good to go IMHO. Your longest encounter will likely be less than 15 yards. At 7.5 and closer, you're in point shoot range. I practice this, point shooting from 3 and 7.5 yards. This is far more useful for self defense than shooting groups off a rest at 25. BUT, I use the rested group thing as a judge of the gun, rather than my skills. If I could, I'd shoot 'em out of a mechanical rest, but those things are expensive and I can judge a gun's accuracy by shooting off a solid rest.

But, no, most 9mm carry guns CAN'T shoot 2" groups at 25 yards, but it's not necessary to do that.
 
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At least wear pants, but probably a shirt as well.

Anything less would be indecent!

Seriously, if you're wanting to get in to competition shooting, your local range or gun club probably has information on joining. I'm sure they would eventually tell you if you are a decent shot for their purposes. If you're just talking infrequent range practice, as far as I'm concerned, if I hit the man-sized target from 7, then 10, then 15 yards out, I think that's "decent".
 

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Generally you need a match grade gun to hit 2" at 25 yards. Like a high-end 1911 or a well set-up 6" revolver. Pretty much any target grade S&W / Ruger / Colt revolver with a longer barrel can do that. Shooters that can do that consistently are rarer than the guns that can do it.

There is the occasional odd-ball sleeper, but I mostly see those only on the internet. I have yet to see an economy grade gun do that on a range with one exception. Frankly, it's asking a lot from a 9mm. Be aware that the internet improves your marksmanship by 267%.

I once read that a "proficient" marksman could keep all his shots on a 10" paper plate at 10 yards. Not a "group" where you allow for "flyers", but all his shots. Like >99%. That sounds about right to me.
 

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I shoot mainly rifles. But every range trip contains 50-100 rounds of some kind of handgun. More than not, a 2" snubbie because that is what I carry.....

Typically, I shoot drills. In my mind's eye, I feel they are more useful. I have several that I do, but with the snub, it is usually an NRA B2 target at 5 yards, (Yes 5), five rounds, inside of five seconds. I typically look for a score of 80 points out of 100 staying in my time frame. There are other drills I do as well, nothing much more taxing than the one I just mentioned. Some involve a reload. But either way, I am confident that my snubbie would get me reasonable odds of living to see another day.
 
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Far as I am concerned if you can keep all shots on a man size target at 7 yards you are good
too go. The day you may have to do this on a real target moving towards you with blood in
their eyes,if you can get them all on regardless of shot diameter size, you will be fine.................
 

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Generally you need a match grade gun to hit 2" at 25 yards. Like a high-end 1911 or a well set-up 6" revolver. Pretty much any target grade S&W / Ruger / Colt revolver with a longer barrel can do that. Shooters that can do that consistently are rarer than the guns that can do it.

There is the occasional odd-ball sleeper, but I mostly see those only on the internet. I have yet to see an economy grade gun do that on a range with one exception. Frankly, it's asking a lot from a 9mm. Be aware that the internet improves your marksmanship by 267%.

I once read that a "proficient" marksman could keep all his shots on a 10" paper plate at 10 yards. Not a "group" where you allow for "flyers", but all his shots. Like >99%. That sounds about right to me.
This is where I am at. While shooting IPSC I usually ran middle of the pack and few stages were over 10 yards. Practicing SD skills I often (usually) use a 10" paper plate taped to the cardboard/target. I'll take a Sharpie and mark a cross on it and put it at 30 and 45 feet. 10" falls well within the chest sized area and if I can place all rounds in those plates I am good to go. I'll never be a marksman, but do want to be sure that I can stop a threat.
 

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So I know this is 9mm cc shooting I have only 2 pistols right now a taurus t 738 in 380 I have noticed at 5 yard 2 to 3 inch is not to hard but at 7 yards much harder now with my much heavier and much larger hipoint c9 I can get 2 to 3 inch groups at 10 yards not sure how good this is as I have only been shooting pistols a few months . But have found for my cc gun it is for very close quarters.
 

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4" and smaller compacts should be 8 - 10" paper plate accurate at 15 yards. That is the goal to work towards for now. Remember the most important aspect of training is "SAFETY".
What is more important than standing slow shooting accuracy, is to run drills that emulate real life conditions. Once you are good with paper plate accuracy, it is time to move on to holster drills. Start with an empty pistol, pull cover garment - slowly bring pistol out of holster - present pistol with your grip of choice, pull trigger - check your surroundings - slowly re holster pistol and repeat until you develop enough muscle memory to complete the drill quickly. No ammo or loaded mags should be within arms reach. You can do this exercise in your house, but once again no loaded mags close by.
Once you master the holster drill , the next step is to put that drill into practice ( if you only shoot at ranges this may be difficult-check with your RSO if allowed ). You repeat the drill above about 10 times with no ammo in pistol, then load one round in the mag,cycle into the barrel and run the drill. remember with a loaded gun speed is not as important as accuracy. So depending on your comfort with the drill - I would run the single round drill at least five times.
Then it is time to start to put it all together - load 3 or more rounds and run the drill doing a triple tap ( two to the torso one to the head ) always remember to re-holster slowly. Mastering this drill will take time..and remember "SAFETY" is more important than speed.
While it is fun and challenging to attempt accuracy at longer distances - that is for fun - not for defense. Once you master accuracy and simple defense drills - then you can begin to work on doing drills while moving - but once again "SAFETY" is more important than being quick. On my ranges I have to constantly be aware of rough ground, critter holes, etc. So I don't have anyone with me when I train so I don;t have to worry about them if I trip. I have been running these type of drills for 3 years monthly - and I am still an amateur at best. I need to take more training classes as we all should, to be exposed to different drills and soak up knowledge.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
These comments and suggestions are helpful and encouraging. Not looking to do competition shooting, just become reasonably proficient. I have watched a few videos by Jerry Miculek and he provides some good information on prefered stance, grip etc.. I purchased a laser bullet and app for dry fire practice at home, while not the same as live fire I do find it hepls to identify issue like trigger pull etc..

At least I no longer feel lime a Putz, thanks guys
 

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A more reasonable standard is, how far do you expect a threat to be? A crook shoot at you from 50 yards is likely not a threat. 5 yards, much more so. How about a pie plate at 5 yards? That's more or less center of mass on a man-sized target. Work up from there.
 

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See, there's what the GUN can do, measured in groups at 25 yards typically and fired from a solid rest or best yet, a ransom rest. THEN, there's shooter accuracy fired off hand. When I'm looking at a possible gun purchase, I'm interested in the GUN'S accuracy. Folks will get on the net and talk about their new gun that I might be interested in and show me a group they fired at 3 feet off hand. :rolleyes: That tells me absolutely NOTHING about the gun. I wanna know about the gun, will deal with my use of it if and when I get one.

When I read a write up in a gun magazine, the standard test of accuracy is five shots at 25 yards from a ransom rest if possible or fired off sandbags if not. Now, MY limits of firing off sandbags are variable with the sight radius. I can hold 1" with an accurate 4-6" revolver off bags. Semi-autos are not generally as accurate as medium frame revolvers and I have never found the 9mm to be all THAT accurate. A compact 9 is fighting sight radius limitations, too.

That's the gun, how YOU shoot it is a different matter.
 
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I assume that this would be decent shooting with a compact 9mm.

7 - 8 yards and 1 - 2 seconds between shots. On December 18, 2018

Taurus G2C and 50 rounds Federal 115grFMJ

Shooting sport Target archery Circle Recreation Shooting
 

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I am fairly new to pistol shooting and have a TH9C compact 9mm pistol. I would like to know from some of you experienced shooters what is considered being reasonably accurate with a 9mm compact pistol.

One forum post I read said form a standing position with 2 hand grip you should be able to maintsin a 2” group at 25 yards and a 4” group at 50 yards. I found that pretty discouraging as with aging eyes the sights tend to be be a bit of a blur and the short sight radius does not give you a lot to work with and I doubt I will ever be able to maintain a 2” group at 25 yards.

I currenty shoot a 3” group at 5 yards which I am OK with being new to pistol shooting. With traing and practice I might be able to get that down to a 1 1/4” group at 5 yards but doubt I can get much better than that.

I am not looking to be a marksman, just a decent shot.

From what I see at the range maintaing a 2” group at 25 yards would be the exception for the majoriy of shooters, but it is a public range and my guess is a lot of shooters there are occasional shooters at best.

Just want to set some Realistic expectaions for myself.
Keyboard commandos!

Let's take the touchy feely out of it and look at the numbers.
Your gun has a 3.54 inch barrel. If your sights are not aligned down the middle and are off to one side or the other (about a 1/16th. of an inch) every 3.5 inches will be off 1/16th.
Let's round up to a 4" barrel for math purposes. If you're off 1/16th, your off 3/16's every foot.(12/4) In 5 feet you're off 15/16's or 1 inch. At 20 feet, you're going to be off 4 inches.

You talk about grouping. Okay, your "group" may be down and to the left of the bull, but you still have a decent "group", though you're not hitting the bull. Which is another problem(s) for another day.
So, let the warriors talk about reaching out 75 feet with 1 or 2 inch groups. The fact is, you are not going out on the shooting circuit, so run your target out to 21 ft. and practice, practice, practice.
Aim small, miss small.
Good luck and be safe!
 

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For defensive practice with my TCP and snubbies, I shoot 8” paper plates at 7 yards. I’m firing as rapidly as I’m comfortable with and looking for consistency more than tight groups. Yeah, I could slow down and tighten the groups, but slow and steady isn’t practicing for a defensive situation.
 

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These comments and suggestions are helpful and encouraging. Not looking to do competition shooting, just become reasonably proficient. I have watched a few videos by Jerry Miculek and he provides some good information on prefered stance, grip etc.. I purchased a laser bullet and app for dry fire practice at home, while not the same as live fire I do find it hepls to identify issue like trigger pull etc..

At least I no longer feel lime a Putz, thanks guys
First off, let me say this. you were never a putz nor should you feel like one. You had a question and you asked it. You did this because you want to get better at your skills. A putz doesn't want to improve; ever. they are content being a putz. Now we can all go and look at Youtube videos and magazine articles all day long written by people who make their livings off of using firearms. When I was shooting competitive archery, I was practicing between 6-8 hours a day 6 days a week. Many pro shooters do this because it's their job to do this. Things they learned years and decades ago are so ingrained in their shooting styles that it's not even second nature but 1st nature. You will never be at the same level they are without putting in the same amount of time they did. But rest assured; they ALL had to start at the same place you did. I will guarantee you that the first pistol Jerry Miculek picked up wasn't a S&W 500 revolver and fired 6 rounds in 4.3 seconds. Nor did he start by picking up a 9mm holding it upside down and hit a steel target 1000 yards away while firing with his pinky. Skills take time to develop. Learn what works best for YOU and improve upon it.
 
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