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I have two lead garden tractor wheel weight's, 68lbs each. I also have over a bunch of .38spl brass, along with some .357 as well. Thing is, I don't know how to reload. Is there an easy to read and understand, book on reloading that you might recommend?

Thanks for any help!
 

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Any of them are your friend. I would get a few so you always have additional info when needed. I don't have any in particular I would recommend. Also get some on casting because there is a lot of info needed there also.
 

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ABC's of Reloading is where I started my initial research. The book seems to be a little dated as the pictures seem to be old, but the text is pretty good and it gives good detail on the steps for loading rifle, handgun and shotgun shells. It tells you about differences in presses and equipment needed and there is even info on casting your own bullets. It explains the make-up of good cast bullets noting the differences in types of lead and their chemical make up.
 

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Echoing the Lee book ABC's of Reloading. Clear concise and an excellent place to begin your journey. The Lee equipment is also full of value, rugged and durable.

Theoretically at 68 # each, you may well get over 6,000 lead cast bullets at 158 grains each!
 

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Please start by reading the two "stickies" at the head of this forum.
 
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Another vote for the ABC's of Reloading. I got it pretty cheap from Amazon. Like HD-Mike says, the pics are old, but the text is updated and mentions web sites pretty frequently, so it has been updated as the years have gone by. A valuable resource.
 

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all of those books are good choices, and you will need one when you start, but i would also look to youtube lots of info on how to reload, as well as how to cast bullets.
 

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My advice would be just try to get one or the other down first. Trying to learn reloading and bullet casting at the same time might be a bit much. Most reloaders I know are self taught. In the olden times before the Internet we used books. It's still a good way to go. There's plenty on the Internet but it's disorganized snippets. You might miss something.
 

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Just as important, be sure to let us know how you are progressing...we're a nosy lot! :D
 
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I would suggest in this order:

1. Watch several videos on YouTube to see what you are getting into, pay attention to different types of presses.
2. Get one reloading book, if you think you are going to use Lee equipment get the Lee Book, if not either Lee or ABC's
3. After the 1st 2 above if you think it is right for you get the second book.
4. Pick you equipment that you want to start with, watch a few more videos specific to that equipment. Note everything you will need so when you order you don't miss anything.
5. Take your time, make a few rounds at first, test them, then have fun. Never get complacent in the process, be safe.
6. If you have any questions at all, no matter how stupid they may seem, ask here or somewhere else, but definitely ask.

If you have the opportunity to learn from someone already reloading take advantage of that early in the process, to me nothing beat hands on experience.
 

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And of course, the equipment you buy will depend on what you are reloading, handgun rounds dont require some of the items that will be required for rifle for instance.

If you like the lee turret press, kempfgunshop.com has the classic press kit for around $200 last i looked, and it comes with a set of dies, in fact all you will need is something to clean the brass, and a scale, they also sell both of those items.

I like the turret press mainly because while you are learning you can take the indexing rod out of it and use it as single stage press, but once you have the hang of it you can put it back in and its a turret press.
 

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If you can find someone who reloads already, get them to help teach you. Here in Alabama, just about every other person reloads, haha. I'm getting someone I know to teach me before I purchase my own equipment.
 

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I've got a Lee Modern Reloading 2nd Ed. and it has been very helpful (i'm new to the craft myself). Also, since it is hard for most of us new guys to find everything we need for getting set up (during this liberal gun Apocalypse) , you may be able to find a Lee Loader on ebay. I bought one for my .357 a couple months back and just started using it. It is primitive and slow, but very durable and produces good ammunition (after you screw up a couple of rounds while you learn). All you need is that kit and a rubber mallet! I like it because I can sit on the back deck and make ammo or at the kitchen table. With the kit, you are limited to the variety of types of loads (for one caliber) that you can make because it doesn't come with all the measurement gadgets, but you can supplement the kit with powder measures, scales, calipers and all the other things that you will eventually need as you go. That is what I've been doing. I think the slow process also helps me learn about the many variables of the process. But I've gotten good enough to where I can load a familiar 50 rounds in about hour or a little bit longer.
 

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You've gotten some good advice so far. Besides the books someone mentioned Youtube and I agree that's a good place to watch different kinds of presses in action. You can also go to Lee's web site at this address Help Videos - Lee Precision and see all their help videos that covers every one of their presses and how to adjust all of their dies etc. Real good info there.

I was lucky as a kid because I had an uncle that reloaded and he got me started reloading around 1963. He drilled it into my head how dangerous it could be if I didn't do exactly as he said. It was a year before he let me do any loading on my own. I followed his directions to the letter for a couple of years until I got to thinking I knew it all. A teenager that knows it all?? You know that's not going to turn out good just by the sound of it!:rolleyes:

One day I decided I would push the limit just a little bit more since I had already been loading on the high side of max. so I loaded up some EXTRA high powered 20 ga. shotgun shells to shoot. Yeah these rounds will reach out there and get those doves I thought even better than a 12 ga. How did that turn out you might ask? Not so good! I'll never forget that first shot on opening day of dove season in 1965. I can still taste the powder in my mouth and the smell as some of it must have come out of the chamber besides just out the end of the barrel. :eek: There was only a small piece of brass left in the chamber of that Remington Wingmaster 20 ga. pump shotgun as it blew every bit of that shell out the end of the barrel. The sound seemed to be at least twice as loud as I'd ever heard it before and the recoil was substantially more. Scared me to death! If it hadn't been for that well built Remington shotgun I might not be here typing this tonight or at least not without having to get someone else to type it for me. Lets just say I learned my lesson that day and I never, ever did that again!!!!! NOT EVER! A humbling experience for a know it all teenager! I never told my uncle, rest his sole, 'cause if I did he would have whooped me no matter how old I was. :)
 
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