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I've owned one of these since October of 2015, it was my first rimfire pistol and I love it.

Don't believe all the nonsense about these being made of pot metal, that was just an error posted on the American website in the early days of production which has since been corrected, but elitists and salesman of vintage .22cal PPKs continue to perpetuate out of self-interest. The only real negatives about these are the horrendous 17.5lb DA trigger and to a lesser extent the matte black finish on the so-called "blued" models, but the former is offset by the decent 6lb SA trigger and the latter by simply opting for a nickel finish.

Otherwise, they're fantastic little plinkers with a classy look. I paid $370 for mine back in 2015 with no regrets, so $240 is a steal as far as I'm concerned.
 

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Yeah, I thought the slides were made of Zamak?
The slide is some non-ferrous alloy but also Zamak really gets a bad rap.

First, Zamak is not one particular metal but a whole range of alloys with individual and unique properties. Some have proven to be great over the decades; I have some Gillette Double Edge razors made before the Korean War with Zamak heads that still shave like new.
 

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Yeah, I thought the slides were made of Zamak?
For a good 5 years the American website mistakenly identified the slide and frame as "zinc diecast" but in reality they're made of some sort of proprietary alloy that Walther uses for all of their rimfire pistols, supposedly it's an Aluminum alloy since that's what they identify it as when it comes to their rimfire 1911s and the PPQ22. I actually got this information right from the source by e-mailing Walther Germany about it some years back after learning that the American website had misidentified the slide on the PK380 and PPQ22 as "zinc diecast" and seeing a lot of professional reviews which identified the slide as steel. They told me that it was, "A proprietary alloy" which was "much stronger than ZAMAK" and although I can't be 100% sure since English obviously wasn't their first language and may very well have just been written in German than ran through Google Translate, but it seemed like they were saying that it wasn't a zinc based alloy at all, which would make sense since most of their other rimfire pistols are made with an Aluminum alloy.
Shortly afterwards, the American website was updated and all references to the slide/frame material were removed or replaced, so clearly Walther Germany contacted Walther Arms USA about it after my e-mail broght the error to their attention.

In fact, the only rimfire pistol Walther ever made that was constructed of ZAMAK was the P22, and quite possibly only the original Gen 1 models.

However, there are a lot of snobs out there who denigrate any/all examples of the PP Series save for the prewar and WWII-era examples, including the arguably superior French-made post WWII models, who will jump at any excuse to downplay the quality/reliability of other models, so obviously the gun being made of ZAMAK was just too good of a reason to let go of, so they continue to mention it long after it was proven false and subsequently correct on the domestic website. I've even confronted them about it on occasion and they just stop posting when called out.

For the record, I have nothing against ZAMAK as it is an industry standard alloy which is used in a wide array of applications and seems to be plenty durable for firearms so long as an adequate amount of the material is used, which Hi-Point firearms stand as testament to. However, in the case of the PPK/S .22, according to the representatives I've corresponded with via e-mail, it is not made of ZAMAK, and seemingly isn't made of any zinc-based alloy whatsoever.
 
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17.5 lb trigger ? I will pass ! I owned a PPK 380 in the 1980s and did not like that trigger either !
Like I said, the SA trigger is a mere 6lbs, and being a DA/SA hammer-fired pistol, the DA can be bypassed by either chambering a round with the safety/decocker lever in the fire position, or otherwise manually cocking back the hammer with your thumb.

Still, there are obviously far better triggers, but for someone like me who is absolutely in love with the aesthetics of the Walther PP Series, it's a non-issue which can easily be worked around, and having grown accustomed to it has had the fringe benefit of making me far more tolerant of heavy triggers.

Besides, it could be worse... It's not quite as bad the the infamous H&K VP70's 18lb DAO trigger. :evil:
 
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Like I said, the SA trigger is a mere 6lbs, and being a DA/SA hammer-fired pistol, the DA can be bypassed by either chambering a round with the safety/decocker lever in the fire position, or otherwise manually cocking back the hammer with your thumb.

Still, there are obviously far better triggers, but for someone like me who is absolutely in love with the aesthetics of the Walther PP Series, it's a non-issue which can easily be worked around, and having grown accustomed to it has had the fringe benefit of making me far more tolerant of heavy triggers.

Besides, it could be worse... It's not quite as bad the the infamous H&K VP70's 18lb DAO trigger. :evil:
Also I can honestly say I've never even noticed the DA trigger as an issue but then I grew up shooting revolvers almost always in the DA mode. If shooting at a target at absolutely ridiculous distances well over 25 yards and from a rest I might shoot a revolver in SA mode but that would only be during fun sessions at a long outdoor range.

Of course the Walther PPK/s is not really meant to be used at such distances and just as with a pistol I would have the option of cocking the hammer manually if I wanted to stretch my limits.

My PP also has a fairly heavy DA trigger and something over 12 pounds would be my guess. But that's also what I like for any gun I carry with a round in the chamber and no manual safety.
 

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Yeah, my Smith & Wesson PPK/S in .380 ACP has something like a 12.5lb DA trigger.

The trigger is heavier on the PPK/S .22 than it is on the .32 ACP and .380 ACP models because rimfire ammo needs to dent the rim in order to ignite the priming compound. Some say that 17.5lbs is excessive, but every time I've read about someone trying to lighten the pull, it came at the expense of reliability.
 

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Being unemployed SUCKS!

Amazing how many GREAT gun deals I've seen since August 1.

All the Best,
D. White
 
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