Taurus Firearm Forum banner
1 - 7 of 57 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
12,344 Posts
Gotta love a good break barrel spring-air rifle. I've got an old Gamo that's still kickin'. The velocity has fallen off over the years - I get 850 fps through the chrono these days, and it used to be 1000. I did find that if I shoot a little WD40 into the bore and swab it with a patch, the next pellet comes out at 1150 fps, but it drops right back down to 850 after the barrel is squeegeed by a pellet. But that one pellet at 1150 sounds just like a 22 lr. Something to keep in mind if you're using Raptor pellets or the like. Don't want the neighbors thinking your shooting a 22 in the back yard. Unless of course that's okay where you live. JAT
 

· Registered
Joined
·
12,344 Posts
HAven't shot it yet, but from what I have read about this rifle, and also from the owners manual, it is as loud as a 22LR for the first 100 shots, until it is broke in some, then it is supposed to quiet down considerably.
Anything that breaks the speed of sound is going to sound like a 22. That's why I mentioned the Raptor pellets - they're made out of some kind of alloy, and they're much lighter than lead pellets which pumps up the muzzle velocity significantly. Beeman makes their Kodiak line of pellets, and I've used them with good results. They're heavier (and slower) than normal pellets, and they penetrate well. I shot a lot of them in my 22 cal side-cocker, and the weight on them was over 20 grains. The .177 variety are 10.65 grains compared to the normal 7 or so grains. Kodiak Extra Heavy Pellets
 

· Registered
Joined
·
12,344 Posts
Looking at parts diagrams I think the difference between spring-air rifles and nitro piston rifles is this - spring-air cocks a spring when you break the barrel, and when you pull the trigger it releases the spring which compresses the air at the same time it sends the pellet out the barrel. With a nitro piston it looks to me like it compresses the air when you break the barrel, and releases it when you pull the trigger. There's no big spring in a nitro piston rifle. Nitro piston is supposed to last longer because they don't rely on a spring that gets weaker over time. I might have to give one a try for my next air rifle.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
12,344 Posts
I would go for this, I never liked the spring air, felt wrong when it fired.
I've had spring air rifles for years, and the only thing that's really objectionable about them is the recoil. I had a RWS model 54 side cocker that got around the recoil by allowing the entire action to move back and forth. It worked almost like an artillery piece, and while it eliminated the recoil and improved accuracy, it also cost around $500. Seems to me like the nitro piston guns shouldn't recoil like a spring air, and for a lot less money than the RWS setup. I'll be real interested to hear what Rob has to say about his new rifle's recoil.

Another problem with the spring air rifles is that you can tear them up by dry firing them. I'm also interested in whether or not the nitro pistons have the same issue.

I'm looking forward to Rob's range report when it's available.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
12,344 Posts
I suck at artillery hold for these type of guns. From seeing things on the internet, most people must be able to master it.

For me, and I had to learn this the hard way, I have to hold the rifle firmly into my shoulder while keeping the fore end consistently supported. I only use firm back pressure with my trigger hand, yet I do only lightly grip the fore end. If I do that the same way every time, I can sight in a break barrel air rifle successfully and hit 1" targets at 25 yards regurlarly with aperture sights or with a scope.

I am not good enough with a break barrel to out shoot a good rimfire rifle though. Although, I'm sure many air rifle shooters can. :)
I use the same kind of hold as I do when shooing a firearm. If I'm standing I pull it back into the pocket of my shoulder with my firing hand. My non firing hand is harder to describe - if you covered your mouth with your left hand with your thumb on the left and your fingers on the right, and then moved your hand forward about a foot, that's the way I hold my non-firing hand. I set the front of the rifle in the 'V' formed between by non-firing thumb and index finger, and the elbow of my non-firing arm goes right against my body, and buttresses the rifle. It's a hold I learned many moons ago from a Sniper School graduate. He basically said you want to keep as much of your non firing hand off the rifle as possible.

If I'm shooting from a bench I hold exactly the same way as rifle shooting - front rested and the rear held into the pocket of my shoulder and supported under the butt of the stock by my non-firing hand.

As far as accuracy - my favorite indoor game to play with that rifle when I first got it was 'snap the head off the little plastic soldier', and it would do it pretty consistently from across the basement. I'd guess the range at about 20 feet in that little cracker-box of a house.

And while I'm thinking about it - those little plastic soldiers make great airgun targets! :D

 

· Registered
Joined
·
12,344 Posts
OK guys - DH and I have been thinking about air guns - started to looking in to them, am totally confuse, but got a chance to try to actually "break the barrel" of a Stoeger - and my stubby arms just don't seem to take to it too well, but DH has no problems - anybody found any youth type guns out there? did just get CO2 and 22 pellets to try out an old, old Crosman 99 that we found in dad's house while we were cleaning it out - if it doesn't snow/snain tomorrow we might try it, but the seal is probably shot after all these years... You guys gotta' keep us all informed!
The break barrel air rifles tend to shoot the hardest, and the most consistently. Problem I always had with CO2 is that each shot tends to get progressively weaker. With a break barrel gun you get the same 'oompf' every time. If cocking the barrel is a problem, you might try improving the leverage. I'm thinkin' a piece of the appropriate ID pipe slipped over the muzzle might do the trick. JAT.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
12,344 Posts
Have you seen the GAMO videos of a guy feral hog hunting with a GAMO pellet rifle? He takes down a 150 pound pig and then a 250 pound pig. I thought maybe he was shooting them behind the ear, but then they show him standing in front of one and taking it down. These definitely aren't your Daddy's BB guns.
I had a .177 RWS model 48 side cocker, and when I sold it I demonstrated it for the guy. I took a 3 lb coffee can, put a one pound coffee can inside it, and a tin soup can inside that. It shot through all six sides and kept on going. They've got some power.
 
1 - 7 of 57 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top