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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
It saddens me to contemplate that a growing number of Americans are dying each year, either because of their lack of health insurance and/or their inability to pay for medical treatment which could greatly improve their health and extend their overall quality of life, etc.

It is especially troubling when little children die needlessly while politicians dole out $37 Billion Dollars in Foreign Aid annually, which could be put to better use here at home.

( http://nationalpriorities.org/en/blog/2013/05/06/how-much-foreign-aid-does-us-give-away/ )

I have provided a couple of links to information concerning this topic. Check them out and let's compare notes on whether this topic is a legitimate issue in our nation today.

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2009 - http://www.hopkinschildrens.org/lack-of-insurance-may-have-figured-in-nearly-17000-childhood-deaths.aspx

"If you are a child without insurance, if you're seriously ill and end up in the hospital, you are 60 percent more likely to die than the sick child in the next room who has insurance," says lead investigator…”

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2010 - http://prescriptions.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/02/26/deaths-rising-due-to-lack-of-insurance-study-finds/

“…the new study estimated the number of people who had died since the last major push for health care legislation in the early 1990s. It found that between 1995 and 2009, lack of insurance was responsible for more than 290,000 premature deaths.”
 

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It's far more important that we should maintain the gravy train to foreign powers than to look after the health and welfare of our own citizens.

That's 'Murka.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Reminds me of the analogy of the little boy who tried to buy friends by giving other kids his lunch money every day.
 

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I do not understand why there is that many deaths for not having insurance. I hospital can not refuse treatment for not having insurance.
Am I missing something?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I do not understand why there is that many deaths for not having insurance. I hospital can not refuse treatment for not having insurance.
Am I missing something?
"Uninsured people are more likely to skip screenings and other preventive care, so their medical problems are often diagnosed later, when they are more advanced and tougher to treat. The uninsured are also more likely to skimp on necessary medical care, whether it’s prescription drugs to keep their blood pressure in check or surgery to clear up clogged arteries."

"Using more than 23 million hospital records from 37 states between 1988 and 2005, the Johns Hopkins investigators compared the risk of death in children with insurance and in those without. Other factors being equal, researchers found that uninsured children in the study were 60 percent more likely to die in the hospital than those with insurance."
 

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Not to mention the level of care received. As someone with no ins and has to pay everything out of pocket, I've seen firsthand the difference between the care I receive and the care I used to receive when I was insured...night and day difference.

I wish the damned ins. companies would be deregulated and let free market reign. I'm betting I'd be able to actually get insurance at that point. And this whole rule ("It's a rule!") about children not being insurable without being on a parent's policy is crap. Under current rulings I'm uninsurable, so that apparently means my kids are uninsurable as well...awesome...hope nobody falls and breaks an arm or gets sick. And the "High risk" plans...fuggedaboudit!...they cost more per month than I earn in wages...and that doesn't even touch the policy the kids would be under.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
When I was diagnosed with prostate cancer in October of 2000, I promptly was scheduled for surgery within 12 days to undergo surgery. That was back when I had health insurance. I have been without health insurance since 2004, when the economy began to plummet and I could no longer afford to stay on my wife's major medical plan. She and I were paying nearly $400.00 per month for my part of the premium.

Now, I'm with the VA Medical Center for all my healthcare. Last summer I dealt with two debilitating bouts with raging diarrhea and vomiting and had to be admitted to the ER both times and spend several days in the hospital. When I came home from the hospital, I noticed that every time I'd eat or drink I became nauseous and got a sickly, metallic taste in my mouth.

I was scheduled for a CATSCAN in September, 2012. It was performed and I was told there were two lesions on my pancreas, so I was scheduled for an MRI forty-five days later. The MRI indicated that the two lesions were present on my pancreas. Then, I was told that I'd be scheduled for an endoscopy and ultrasound on my pancreas.

They didn't get around to the ultrasound until January of this year. I was still dealing with the nausea each time I ate or drank. The ultrasound did not show lesions on the organ. When I indicated my relief to the specialist who administered the procedure, this was his response: "Well, don't get your hopes up just yet. I am going to recommend that you undergo another CATSCAN and MRI concerning those spots on your pancreas."

I was incredulous. "What do you mean by spots on my pancreas?"

"Well, they were there on the previous two images and, besides, I might have missed something during the ultrasound."

This process began on July 24, 2012 when I was admitted to the VA emergency room the first time. I still do not know what I'm dealing with.

I daresay that if I was still financially able to have the advantage of my wife's bank major medical plan, that what has taken VA ten months to do would have been taken care of within 30-45 days after the first episode.

Don't get me wrong, I am grateful for the VAMC and all the services I receive; but I'm getting a taste of what each and every American will be faced with if full-blown socialized medicine ever takes over.
 

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MPG Harry - I'm not so sure that even if you had insurance that you would have been taken care of 30-45 days after the first episode any more! The health industry sure has changed. It is frightening...
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
MPG Harry - I'm not so sure that even if you had insurance that you would have been taken care of 30-45 days after the first episode any more! The health industry sure has changed. It is frightening...
Truly sad.

I had no idea.
 
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This is just the tip of the Obamacare iceberg! As the government seizes more and more control of the system, it will get worse!

Don't even get me started on foreign aid! :mad::mad::mad:

Hungry children right here in America, and we're funding rebels in the middle east! :mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad:

Harry, you got me all fired up now my friend! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
This is just the tip of the Obamacare iceberg! As the government seizes more and more control of the system, it will get worse!

Don't even get me started on foreign aid! :mad::mad::mad:

Hungry children right here in America, and we're funding rebels in the middle east! :mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad:

Harry, you got me all fired up now my friend! :)
Alright...then just jump in with both feet! :yipee:

I knew some of Mr. Ron Paul's folks would enjoy weighing in on this one. More and more I see the wisdom of his policies.
 
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Oh, I blast my opinions off to my representatives all the time!

I usually get positive responses from my senators, but I don't think my congressman is too thrilled with my ideas! :D
 
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Having insurance doesn't mean anything either. Step-daughter needs a gastric pacemaker (approx. $100,000) so she can process food, but the her dad's insurance says no. Not paying. Hospital says no operation without guarantee of payment.
Her stomach and brain do not connect and she cannot process the food in her stomach. It comes out unprocessed at both ends. She will continue to lose weight until she dies. She turns 21 on Monday.
Medical insurance companies can KMA.
 

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Having insurance doesn't mean anything either. Step-daughter needs a gastric pacemaker (approx. $100,000) so she can process food, but the her dad's insurance says no. Not paying. Hospital says no operation without guarantee of payment.
Her stomach and brain do not connect and she cannot process the food in her stomach. It comes out unprocessed at both ends. She will continue to lose weight until she dies. She turns 21 on Monday.
Medical insurance companies can KMA.
That's the kind of crap that sends me up the wall. Sounds like it's time for a fundraiser and some calls to different hospitals.

Best of luck to your daughter, and if you do decide on a fund raiser let me know and I'd be more than happy to help however I can.
 
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Deregulation is the only thing that will bring the costs down. Each major insurance company has to have a separate company in each state. This means they are multiplying the number of back office employees for each state they do business in. Instead of one HR group they have 50 if they're in all 50 states. Same with IT, customer service, Executives, legal, etc. These are all important jobs, but most companies would not have a rep for every state. Think of the millions they could save and then pass along to the consumer.
 

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Sorry Boys, this thread title is really misleading.

Death rates are the best way to measure deaths and these rates have been declining for years - see chart. Complete mortality data for the United States goes back to 1933...at that time the average life expectancy was around 40 give a take a few years depending on which researcher one chooses to cite.

Products - Data Briefs - Number 88 - March 2012

The number of deaths have been increasing because the number of people in the USA has been increasing. Death rates are a way of standardizing for differences in sized of populations (similar to why we use percentages and not number when comparing significantly different sized groups). The age adjusted death rate eliminates differences in age structure for different populations over time. This is a major way of improving on the analysis of mortality patterns. Just as we know that men and women have different mortality rates, we know that death rates vary by age. Notice in the chart that the total number of deaths have increased over time - due to increase in number of people living and exposed to dying. The age adjusted rate has declined sharply over the same period. The crude death rate is not sensitive to known variables that impact on death so it not as good an indicator of a society's mortality experience as are age and sex specific rates.






People without insurance typically are poorer than those with insurance; that is why they tend to die at a higher rate - they postpone seeking help because they try and recover and are more willing to take a chance that they will recover from an illness (ignorance also plays a factor here). This is especially true among minorities and folks in Southern states. Been that way for a long, long, long time.

It been my experience that physicians should stick to medical research...which they aren't that good at doing and they leave a lot to be desired when they step outside their realm and try and provide medical answers to socio-economic problems associated with social inequality and life chances of which too many haven't the foggiest notion of the scientific literature on mortality.

In addition, medical researchers have a vested interest in having health insurance available to pay for their services...a nice conflict of interest when doing research and making policy recommendations. :mad:

Foreign aid is a drop in the bucket and no guarantee that that money would be used for in ways that would reduce illness or mortality.

Premature deaths...want to reduce them...raise the standard of living and the educational level of the affected populations. The net affect would be increased strategies at prevention of poor health habits, reduction of at risk behaviors and other positive outcomes. This ain't gonna happen...it hasn't happen and the tragedy is with the first Black President getting a pass on the poor economic consequences that impact minorities needless deaths occur and few, if any, lay any responsibility at his door.

Oh yeah, I almost forgot...I didn't see any mention of the approximately 100,000 deaths associated with medical intervention!
 
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