Taurus Firearm Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
37,975 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I heard that these were the hot set up for cleaning guns and that gun shops and ranges use them to clean 'em up. I went and bought the largest model at Harbor Freight and have used it only a few times. I know that some people used them for cleaning brass for reloads, but capacity and time is beat hands down by my FA Tumbler with SS pins.

I thought I had an issue with my PT 111 G2 Mags and ran them for 3 cycles, taking the paint off the ones in the bath.

I have read that assemblies should be dismantled as the vibrations of parts nesting together can screw them up.

What's your experience with these things regarding cleaning firearms? Set the entire gun in, or field strip the slide and /or drop a poly lower in complete?

So far all I have gotten is a wet gun with grease that has to be wiped down anyway. If that's the best that it does, I may as well just wipe it down with Hoppe's.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lomax and Yissnakk

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,746 Posts
I've seen them used on brass, but the results, while better than dry media tumbling, just weren't anywhere near wet tumbling.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lomax and Czechbikr

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,259 Posts
I usually wipe all the heavy stuff off before using the tank.

It does do a good job in all the nooks and crannies that are hard to clean with a brush.

To be honest, I don't usually clean my guns every range trip, other than just wiping down the outside.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,735 Posts
I had a set of black sights turn grey on a Para 1911, might be my fault since I used a Tbs. of lemon juice along with the simple green. Makes my wifes jewelry really sparkly.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,206 Posts
My wife has used them on some of her diamonds and whatnot but never heard of one being used on a gun. I think they just loosen debris but unless the solution you are using is Hoppe's or another solvent, I wouldn't think it would have much effect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,376 Posts
My former job used to use them to clean up stainless steel tubing assemblies after being brazed together side by side. They just used water and the tank heated the water. It took a while but the stuff cleaned up pretty nice. Of course there isn't really anything there to do any harm to. The tubing assemblies were for Sikorsky helicopters.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
35,711 Posts
I've never checked it out, but I'm fairly certain that the bath and the solution used by commercial places is far superior to what they sell us on the open market. There is a place next to the gun range in Plano that will clean your guns, you just drop the entire gun (no ammo of course) into the bath and it does it's thing for 30 minutes or so. I've never done it but I have heard people say that it's great. So, I'd sure love to know what they're using, but I'll bet you a dollar they wouldn't tell you if their life depended on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
984 Posts
I used a commercial grade ultrasound tank in the air tool shack where I'd worked. Some of the pneumatic air tools had fairly intricate internal assemblies and the best way to clean them was with ultra sound. For de-greasing I'd use a solution similar to Simple Green. For cleaning/oiling I'd use 1 qt. mineral spirits mixed with a tablespoon of ATF.

Recently I'd acquired a NIB, PT 908. It had been sitting in its box for quite a while. I field striped the pistol, removed the grips and placed the metal parts into a clean solution of mineral spirits & ATF. The solution became clouded with debris.

After blowing off the excess solution with compressed air(or you could let the parts drain on paper towels for a while), I reassembled the gun and now it's clean and oiled. Mineral spirits will evaporate away, leaving a residual coat of ATF on the metal for lubrication & rust prevention.

Ultrasound for cleaning brass can be done, but I'd rather use a wet tumbler and S/S pins for that.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
37,975 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My wife has used them on some of her diamonds and whatnot but never heard of one being used on a gun. I think they just loosen debris but unless the solution you are using is Hoppe's or another solvent, I wouldn't think it would have much effect.
I used a commercial grade ultrasound tank in the air tool shack where I'd worked. Some of the pneumatic air tools had fairly intricate internal assemblies and the best way to clean them was with ultra sound. For de-greasing I'd use a solution similar to Simple Green. For cleaning/oiling I'd use 1 qt. mineral spirits mixed with a tablespoon of ATF.

Recently I'd acquired a NIB, PT 908. It had been sitting in its box for quite a while. I field striped the pistol, removed the grips and placed the metal parts into a clean solution of mineral spirits & ATF. The solution became clouded with debris.

After blowing off the excess solution with compressed air(or you could let the parts drain on paper towels for a while), I reassembled the gun and now it's clean and oiled. Mineral spirits will evaporate away, leaving a residual coat of ATF on the metal for lubrication & rust prevention.

Ultrasound for cleaning brass can be done, but I'd rather use a wet tumbler and S/S pins for that.
I had read in the instructions and elsewhere that mineral based solvents were not to be used.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,813 Posts
Fort Benning has been using ultrasonic cleaners since at least the 1980s on the turn in and reissue of weapons for training units. I do not know what solution they use. But I know many Infantry guys from back then who would field strip their ARs and run them through their dishwasher too. Citrus based dishwasher soap and Jet, if I remember correctly.

I use hot water and lemon juice to clean my brass to make it look like new. It eats up the carbon pretty quick, probably works better with ultrasonics. I dry my brass by throwing them in the tumbler with plain media and no polish.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lomax

·
Registered
Joined
·
984 Posts
Well trust your instincts. I hadn't had a problem in that regard, not in decades of practice. But then there's always that one guy who wants a warning label named after himself.

Another thing I'm probably doing wrong is stuffing all of my firearms with reloaded ammo.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
37,975 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I searched around some more and find people who also use solvents...I guess that using them with the heat feature might be part of the issue. Some people put the parts in a plastic bag and put that in the ultrasonic to save on the amount of solvent used. I am thinking that the solvent might eat the plastic bag though..
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,206 Posts
... There is a place next to the gun range in Plano that will clean your guns, you just drop the entire gun (no ammo of course) into the bath and it does it's thing for 30 minutes or so. I've never done it but I have heard people say that it's great. So, I'd sure love to know what they're using, but I'll bet you a dollar they wouldn't tell you if their life depended on it.

Next to the Bullet Trap?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
20,082 Posts
My wife has one she bought for jewelry but it will clean and shine up just about anything. Don’t reload - yet - gonna get around to it someday, but I do have a dry media tumbler setup.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,955 Posts
When I heard that these were the hot set up for cleaning guns and that gun shops and ranges use them to clean 'em up. I went and bought the largest model at Harbor Freight and have used it only a few times. I know that some people used them for cleaning brass for reloads, but capacity and time is beat hands down by my FA Tumbler with SS pins.

I thought I had an issue with my PT 111 G2 Mags and ran them for 3 cycles, taking the paint off the ones in the bath.

I have read that assemblies should be dismantled as the vibrations of parts nesting together can screw them up.

What's your experience with these things regarding cleaning firearms? Set the entire gun in, or field strip the slide and /or drop a poly lower in complete?

So far all I have gotten is a wet gun with grease that has to be wiped down anyway. If that's the best that it does, I may as well just wipe it down with Hoppe's.

I have one but like you the wet tumbler on brass works far faster, holds more and generally works better for me.

The sonic cleaner works OK on the carbon that builds up on the front of the cylinder of my Cowboy Action Six Guns and I have been known to put my SA's in upside down to remove the carbon buildup around the inside of the topstrap and barrel. About it, not much else I have used it for.

Machine
 
  • Like
Reactions: Czechbikr

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,206 Posts
I have a Lyman® 2500 Ultrasonic Cleaner. I use it extensively to clean my many revolvers. I fill it with Lyman® Turbo Sonic Concentrated Steel & Gun Parts Cleaning Solution. It does an EXEMPLARY JOB cleaning any STEEL firearm. One caution, however: DO NOT use on any aluminum framed firearm!
 
  • Like
Reactions: gbusmech

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
I have a Lyman 2500 Ultrasonic Cleaner. I use it extensively to clean my many revolvers. I fill it with Lyman Turbo Sonic Concentrated Steel & Gun Parts Cleaning Solution. It does an EXEMPLARY JOB cleaning any STEEL firearm. One caution, however: DO NOT use on any aluminum framed firearm!
Yup it's a no go for aluminum. Just ask my colt mustang pocketlite.

Sent from my LG-H872 using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
37,975 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I have a Lyman® 2500 Ultrasonic Cleaner. I use it extensively to clean my many revolvers. I fill it with Lyman® Turbo Sonic Concentrated Steel & Gun Parts Cleaning Solution. It does an EXEMPLARY JOB cleaning any STEEL firearm. One caution, however: DO NOT use on any aluminum framed firearm!
Yup it's a no go for aluminum. Just ask my colt mustang pocketlite.

Sent from my LG-H872 using Tapatalk
Thanks for the reminder...I don't want to give my PT 92 AFS Duotone a bath in there..:rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
984 Posts
This is a sweet 1903 Pocket Colt. I dipped it when I bought it a decade ago. Last time I shot it, it was cleaned, oiled and stored in my safe. Yesterday I dipped it again.
Firearm Gun Trigger Starting pistol Gun accessory
I filled the tank with clean mineral spirits, a tablespoon of ATF, then ran the half of the parts for 15 minutes. Normally I'd run the tank for no more than 10 minutes.

Solvent temp was up to 107 degrees F when the parts were removed and drained. The frame was then immersed and ran for an additional 15 minutes. Solvent was very clouded.
Tray

After draining, the pistol was assembled, wiped down and stored.
Firearm Gun Trigger Gun accessory Starting pistol
Overnight the dirt settled to the bottom of the tank. After siphoning off the cleaner solvent, a teaspoon of what resembled grinding compound, remained in the tank.


Final temp of the solvent reached 117.2 Fahrenheit on a solvent with a 100 degree flash point. Mineral spirit auto ignition occurs at 473 F. With paper, auto ignition occurs at Fahrenheit 451.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Czechbikr

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,841 Posts
I once cleaned my Poly Judge with my ultrasonic cleaner after a range sessions using black powder cartridges. It did a fine job but I will say this: better get it out and dry before too long and oil every nook and every cranny and, even the spots you can't get to, drop some oil down and operate whatever it is to work it in there because everything comes out, including the good stuff. Very simple but it must be done or you will get rust.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Czechbikr
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top