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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a PT 99 that I bought new, which now has 100 rds. down the pipe. I want to break in the trigger and am wondering if I can just repeatedly pull the trigger on a snap cap. They're home made, with hot glue instead of a primer. My thinking is that a trigger smooths out with repeated firing, so that should do it. So, what do y'all think?
 

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That works well on my revolvers, but you need to polish up the feed ramp also and work the action to smooth up the slide.

9mm is the least expensive center fire ammo, and breaking one in at the range isn't that bad.
 

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After 1-2k rounds, the trigger on my 92 really isn't much 'better', not much room for improvement. :D As Jake mentioned, the real 'break in' is with the feed ramp and action so a range 'break in' really isn't too expensive, or problematic. Good excuse to go to the range. Happy Shootin'.
 

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Keith, I'm no gunsmith by any stretch of the imagination, but I'll throw my two-cent's worth in anyway.

Firearms were designed to shoot live ammunition, not snap caps. Lots of folks swear by them, and that's all well and good if they choose to do so, but live fire :shooter:is what breaks the gun in all aspects, and it is a heck of a lot more fun as far as I'm concerned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Good advice as always. Sounds to me like the squirrels in my neighborhood are in for a restless spring. Thanks to you all.
 
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Shooting is the best way to break it in - but when you can't get to the range, it's OK to take out the bad guys on TV with snap caps. Just be sure there isn't any live ammo in there! :eek:

I just buy them as opposed to making my own - that little spring in there will last a long time & they aren't all that expensive - but I would suppose the old standby of an empty cartridge with hot glue in the primer pocket will work too. Truth is, most manufacturers now advise that dry firing is OK with an empty chamber but I still like to use snap caps.

The only real PIA is with DOA and/or striker-fired pistols & having to retract the slide to reset the trigger. My M&P only needs to be pulled back a little; not sure of any of the others.
 

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It helps a bit to use snap caps to help break in a trigger, but i think it's more helpful in training the users muscle memory with the weapon. Once you've pulled that trigger a number of times, you train yourself to know where, when and how that trigger is going to react time after time. Snap caps serve their function as good training tools, and the modest investment pays for itself after just the first 100 strikes.
 
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Like Montkun says, it's muscle training, like getting a good sight picture quickly and holding steady when the hammer falls.

But the others are right too. You got to 'train' the gun too, and that takes bullets out the barrel.
 
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It helps a bit to use snap caps to help break in a trigger, but i think it's more helpful in training the users muscle memory with the weapon. Once you've pulled that trigger a number of times, you train yourself to know where, when and how that trigger is going to react time after time. Snap caps serve their function as good training tools, and the modest investment pays for itself after just the first 100 strikes.
I agree with you Montkun. I will add that my ruger GP100 instruction manual says it's OK to dry fire, However I still used snap caps in it.

I"m Old school I geuss.
 

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I've always been a fan of snap caps. One firearm that made the most difference was my Savage Edge. It has a pretty heavy factory trigger, and after using the snap caps I don't know how many times, the trigger smoothed up quite a bit....
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
And again, more good advise. Y'all are a bunch of fart smellers, I mean smart fellers!

Thanks again.
 

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I had a Springfield XD-9 once. I kept dry-firing it, with a snap-cap, and I could feel it get better and better 'til at about 100 rounds it was as good as it was going to get. I kinda wish I had kept it. Heckuva gun.

Right now I have a snap-cap in my 24/7. The weather is too poor to go shootin' but the TV has some really good targets. Bang-bang, you're dead.
 
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LOL, when I was a kid working in the back of my father's TV shop, we had a guy come in with a TV that had a bullet hole through the picture tube. This guy would put on his Colt SA rig every night and draw against Marshall Dillion on Gun Smoke (for those of you who can remember that it always opened with Marshall Dillion drawing in a gun fight). So after years of doing this he finally beat Marshall Dillion to the draw and was so excited he shot his TV. Funniest thing I ever saw.
 

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My feelings toward snap caps are that they do more for "shooter" break-in than for trigger break-in. I have snap caps for every firearm I own and use them extensively for learning how a trigger breaks, fire-reload-fire, and function from failure drills. It will also build your hand and forearm muscles while encouraging hand-eye coordination.

Live fire does more for smoothing up the action of a firearm than just using snap caps, however, most firearms will benefit from its owner dry-firing during a favorite TV program.

Rimfires and revolvers that have the firing pin on the hammer are still a NO-GO, but most of today's firearms are safe to dry-fire, even without snap caps. With that in mind, I still don't dry-fire without 'em. Old habits die hard and I've already invested the money in snap caps. I can't or won't keep track of every single firearm that needs 'em and the ones that don't. They all get snap caps. I see it as cheap insurance.

The Taurus PT92/99 series is a good one. I think you'll be very happy with your purchase. They are overbuilt for caliber, offer little recoil, are surprisingly accurate and I much prefer the frame mounted safety decocker over Beretta's slide mounted safety. Except for the grip sleeves losing their threads, I can't think of any other repair we've done on them. Don't over tighten your grip screws and you won't need to worry about it. If you do strip the threads, it's a very easy and cheap repair.

I have my own theories on what proper trigger break-in entails, but I'll save that for another post.
 

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Since I also reload, I make my own snap caps.

 

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I agree in principle, but I get a lot of good practice with snap caps in revolvers. If I were in a place where I could fire off the back porch I would have no need for them.
 
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