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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Given the number of ways to carry, I wonder how long do you think it would take you to get your first round out of the gun.
Granted the quickest time will be for those who can open carry on their hip.
But most of us don’t have that option.

Some mention that they ‘deep carry’. Does that mean it’s inside their jockeys? It certainly sounds like it will take more time to pull, de safety, aim and squeeze the trigger.
Another mentioned he had a special undershirt with a special pocket by his left arm.

My personal opinion, and I hope I never find out, is you will either have no time or you will have 10’s of seconds.

If you are the target, face on, and the BG has a gun, you won’t be able to even attempt to go for you gun. Unless you don’t mind absorbing the first round in the confrontation.

Where as if you just happen to be in the area of the crime as in a store robbery, you will have a significant amount of time.

So in your opinion or in your tests . . .
How long would it take you from the time you decide to go for your gun, pull, de cock/ chamber, rotate 90 degrees, aim and squeeze off your first round?
For those with back up pieces, how much longer for your second line of defence?

If you feel my assumptions are off base let me have it.
 

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I have no idea. I cannot carry in RI. I can draw my TCP from it's belt pouch quickly though. I would say 2.5-3 seconds to get a decent shot off.
 

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I think that's something each of us has to practice, SAFELY (EMPTY CHAMBER/NO MAG), at home before adopting our method of carry. Just to practice getting your firearm clear and extended. It would be best to actually take a defensive pistol course offered in your area as well.

Just be very aware and safety conscious. "Quick Draw" (no, not you, sir!) practice can result in a Bad Day if you are being stupid.
 
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Samkent - there are too many questions in your query and you come pretty close to answering yourself as well. TXEric addresses the underlying issue of practice (and safety). No matter how you carry you should practice gaining access to your gun. This should become part of your 'muscle memory'. Practice sitting, standing, on stairs, in the car... It didn't lake me long to figure out that if I was carrying pocket or IWB that standing was a breeze but trussed up in seat belts and seated in my car - a big guy in a low coupe that getting my gun was a real problem. I now unholster as I enter (or inside - depending on location) and place the gun between my seat and the raised center console. Access is almost instant. If I were to see unavoidable trouble coming - trouble would be waiting to greet them/it.

You might get more responses if you described a particular situation that required an armed response. "Draw" - is not real world based.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
'Draw" was not my word but I did use a close one 'pull'. Same meaning in the context of guns.
Since I have zero real world baseline for conceal I a trying to get my ducks in some sort of row. I/we take our class this weekend and then we have to wait.

What I am trying to get at is speed/ease vs depth of concealability. Some of the locations for concealing make me wonder how quickly they could make use if push came to shove. I guess I am asking about the 'fumble factor'. We can't always wear polo shirts. Sometimes we must wear buttons.

Since others have already tried various locations, I am trying to gauge what I feel would be best for me.
 

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I worry more about being aware than how fast I can draw. I do draw every night when I unholster, muscle memory is very important.
 

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It mainly comes down to you decided how you want to carry. My first carry method was an inside the waistband holster with a regular shirt over it. After breaking in the holster, it became comfortable. Then I got fat and didn't want to buy bigger pants. So I started pocket carrying a revolver. Then I decided to buy a tcp and pocket carry it. If I want to carry my bigger hardware, I carry it owb and a long shirt.

You have to make a decision on what you want to try, and just try it. Then practice just like the others suggested.
 

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That is something I do not worry about. I practice at the range drawing slowly and deliberately and hitting the target.
You should recognize a danger long before the pistol needs to come out of it's holster which would hopefully negate the need for a gun. If I ever have the misfortune to need to draw and fire a weapon it will not be done in a hurry.
That last thing I want to do is whip my gun out of it's holster and start blasting away.
I would worry about the target, what's behind the target, what's on either side of the target and whether or not I just soiled myself.
I don't carry a back up gun. One is hard enough to conceal properly. If I think I need two guns when I go somewhere maybe I shouldn't be going there and if one gun isn't enough I doubt if 12 more would help.
 

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I'm torn between speed and stealth pulling/drawing and leaning to stealth if the situation allows.
 
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'Draw" was not my word but I did use a close one 'pull'. Same meaning in the context of guns.
Since I have zero real world baseline for conceal I a trying to get my ducks in some sort of row. I/we take our class this weekend and then we have to wait.

What I am trying to get at is speed/ease vs depth of concealability. Some of the locations for concealing make me wonder how quickly they could make use if push came to shove. I guess I am asking about the 'fumble factor'. We can't always wear polo shirts. Sometimes we must wear buttons.

Since others have already tried various locations, I am trying to gauge what I feel would be best for me.
Lots of good words between my last comment and here. Carry, situational awareness, handling threats, control and sight acquisition - more - all are part of the bigger picture.

I identified how I handled my two most common methods of carry when in a car - remove the gun for better accessibility.

Walking around I can access my gun(s) very quickly from pocket or IWB carry. OWB is even faster access and sometimes in the winter when I'm 100% on my time I use that method. Recently I have been an industry consultant (18 mo.) and make my own schedule as my own boss BUT for 5 years before that I worked in an environment where I had to leave my gun in a lock box in the car during business.

Your business environment and dress (as you hinted) will dictate some of the parameters of how you carry. I know some people who use the CrossBreed SuperTuck with success. I was never comfortable with it. I know a guy who goes to work with an ankle rig. A couple of friends swear by belly bags and bands or 5.11 Tactical undershirts too!

It's great that you are asking questions and gathering information. Eventually Make a list of what you THINK may be a good fit and give it a try. There is probably not a person on here who carries who has not bought more than one holster and resold it or dropped in a drawer. More like 6 holsters is probably true. You are going to have to size up your limits/parameters then do the try and buy. Many stores have a procedure for trying on holsters or are very return friendly. A lot of what you may want will only be on the net - a lot more selection, a little more hassle.

A great way (beyond one-on-one training) to get comfortable with gun handling skills is to shoot in IDPA (or similar) competition. You will draw. You will have to reload on the fly, you will shoot while moving, laying on the ground, sitting in a chair, on an ATV, through windows - much more. If you shoot the match with an IWB and the gun that you will carry (for example) - excellent training. Even if you won't wear the same rig your comfort level and confidence will be raised and you will meet a bunch of like minded people willing to share great info on all levels.

Enough rambling - hope some of that was helpful.
 
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Situational awareness is number one. I've even carried my firearm in my hand, in questionable situations from the door to the car. Covered of course.
 
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Which ever way you decide to go, get some snap caps and practice. There are arguments on whether snap caps are needed or not but from various articles I've seen on what COULD happen from dry firing your weapon, I would recommend going with the snap caps.

1. Practice your draw to find the best place to keep your weapon balancing access and comfort and to build up a muscle memory for it.
2. Practice your aim and squeezing the trigger to get to used to it and the feel of it.
3. If your pistol of choice is an semi-automatic, practice your reactions to a fail to fire. If it's a Single Action/Dual Action, getting used to the increased trigger pull from the dual action mode. If its a single action only, getting used to quickly either racking the slide or pulling back the hammer to be able to attempt shooting again. Since you would be practicing for an emergency situation, I would go for racking the slide.
4. One recent suggestion I read lately that may have some merit, is to have a partner off to the side, rack the slide while you are in your shooting stance like you are ready to fire. This simulates the firing of the weapon and determines if your grip and stance is proper or not. If it is not, you will either me readjusting your grip after the slide is racked or you will shift in your footing. Compact firearms need a strong grip like you are holding a hammer because of the nature of the gun (more recoil and it needing a more firm grip for the slide to function properly). Too weak of a grip can cause a misfeed such as stove piping or the slide not moving enough to eject the spent cartridge and loading another round.

The main thing is practice. On and off the range. You want things to become second nature before your life is on the line or the lives of your friends and loved ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
A great way (beyond one-on-one training) to get comfortable with gun handling skills is to shoot in IDPA (or similar) competition.
That sounds like fun. But there's only one problem.
Bullets!:)
 
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