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Discussion Starter #3
You are partially correct. The 'Second Allin' (50-70) and was actually produced in early 1867 and it is known as the Model 1866 Springfield rifle. The first Trapdoors were actually built on surplus Springfield muskets. The Trapdoor (block) is dated 1866 by the top hinge. Neither the first or second Allin had a receiver. Search Model 1865 Springfield and Model 1866 Springfield.


This specific rifle was originally a 58 cal musket in 1864 according to the date on the lock plate.
 

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that is a nice musket
 

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It looks 80%, I wonder what its worth?
 

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I wonder if it would pass the Pawn Stars test and what Rick would give for it? :)
 
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$1,000 to $1,800 from what i've seen, the one pictured toward the upper end of the scale.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Yes, the rifle is mine. I was a present from my daughter and her husband about a dozen years ago.

Rick might want it but it's not for sale. Daughter and her husband will have to decide what to do with it after I'm gone.

I would guess that it's semi-VG+. Yes, it has some dings in the stock and no rust. The basic history from what I have found it very interesting. This the second version in the evolution of the trapdoor Springfield. I have not seen the first Allin (1865) other than in pictures. It was in 58 Rim fire. The second Allin is a bored out musket barrel with a braised liner chambered for the 50-70 Government centerfire. There's an interesting write-up on the 50-70 round in Wiki.

The build of the rifle is amazing in my opinion. Consider that Springfield Armory took surplus caplock muzzle loader rifles and re-engineered them into breach loaders with 1860's tooling. Allin kept the threaded breach block, reamed out the rear of the barrel and chambered the liner. He designed a hinged trap door which is attached to the barrel as well as the lockup lever with a roller cam to lock the trapdoor into a recess at the breech block area. They also braised a chunk of steel where the nipple was and then milled it to match the surrounding area. Both of the conversions had one primary flaw, case extraction. What a crummy system they had. My experience is actually limited to the second system with the 50-70 Government chambering. It just doesn't work at all and I use a cleaning rod to pop the fired case out. Extraction is supposed to be done by a short 'nib' protruding from the top of the trapdoor. It's on the center of the pivot hinge and it's small about 1/8". In my rifle, it will slice a 'V' groove thru the cartridge rim. The 'nib' is just to the left of the screw that attached the trapdoor hinge to the barrel in the following picture.
P1010041.JPG


The next generation in 1868 was the first trapdoor to actually a separate defined action attached to the barrel and a much better extraction system.

I have fired it at 50 yards with 65 grains of Goex CTG and a 450 grain Flat nose bullet. It shoots and I'm happy.
 

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I love these old historic pieces. If I ever have the opportunity to acquire one of these I will. It's second on my list though...50-90 sharps is #1.
 

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A nice pice of history you have there.... smiley thumb.gif
 

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I love these old historic pieces. If I ever have the opportunity to acquire one of these I will. It's second on my list though...50-90 sharps is #1.
My family came over from Germany just before the Civil war in Virginia. It would have been nice if they kept any weapons from that period but they were Catholic pacifists. The only soldiers that were on our property were a Confederate Cavalry unit that traded our horses for theirs and were very polite.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
I love these old historic pieces. If I ever have the opportunity to acquire one of these I will. It's second on my list though...50-90 sharps is #1.
I suspect a 50-90 Sharps might hurt a bit. In fact, I can almost feel the ache. I have a Gemmer Sharps in 45-70 and wear a Past recoil pad because of the skinny butt plate.
 

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My dad in the late 40's , picked up side jobs trying to scrape up money , just for him to help support his new family .. One of his side jobs was to tear down this old house , just for the lumber ,, which he would sell .. The agreement he kept whatever was in the house .. And behind the wall boards he found a Colt 1860 conversion .. Which the way my father described it was like new ... It was wrapped up in a old chop sack ... He traded the old revolver for a new Model 37 Winchester 20ga shotgun , two hogs and 6 dollars .. I have the old 20 gauge in my safe ...

My dad always said he burnt that fellow a new rump hole !!!
 

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Boy that is in great shape! Very nice, thanks for sharing both the pics and the history.
 
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