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Glad the guy was okay and safely survived. Not a bad outing for a .45ACP pistol.

Black bears can come a lot heavier than that.

One thing that haunts the mind though and we weren't there so it might never be known?

Could he have backed or walked away safely from the bear and not have to shoot? Not giving ground or expecting the bear to just leave could be seen as taking too much for granted or unecessarily jeopardizing both bear and human.

Hard to say inder the circumstances. Been around black bears in Northern Wisconsin and elsewhere for quite a while. When meeting them I always gave ground, but was aware exactly where they were at all times.

Did things in a slow proper manner.

No sense in having things escalate.

Hard heavy bullets do have their place in the scheme of things.
 

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wow! better to have protection and not need it rather than need protection and dont have it!!! IF YOU WANNA KEEP THE PEACE YOU GOTTA KEEP A PIECE! lol
 

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Morrel's are great eating, glad I only have to contend with skunks, chiggers and ticks to get mine in Okla. It is sad that the game dept. just trashed the hide on a fine bear tho.
 

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In oregon and washington when you go mushroom picking you don't take a gun for the four legged predators, you take them for the two legged ones. You got transients living in the woods, who either cook meth or pick the other kind of mushrooms and they defend their squats violently. Also you get your trailer trash who make extra money off picking mushrooms and mountain berries and think that certain patches of the national forest are their territory, and they make any outsider feel real unwelcome. Some parts of the west are still wild.
 

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Here is another bear story I found on M&P forum; thsi time the guy with a .45ACP wasn't so lucky! :eek: :-\

Man survives struggle with black bear in Oregon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

GLIDE, Ore. -- Aaron Wyckoff didn't start to panic until his .45-caliber pistol quit firing, and the bear kept chewing on his arm.

So, he recalls, he tried to pull the bear's jaws apart. Then he tried to roll down the ridge where he and the bear were wrestling. But the bear grabbed his calf, pulled him back and went for his groin.

Wyckoff said he countered by shoving his pistol and his hand into the bear's mouth. But by then, the struggle in the Cascade Range in Southern Oregon attracted the attention of Wyckoff's party, and other hunters rushed over.

Justin Norton fired a round from his .44-caliber pistol into the black bear's stomach, to no avail. He approached the bear, put the gun behind its ear and fired again. It finally rolled away.

"I walked right up to his head, and he didn't even look at me," said Norton, 26.

With the dying bear still struggling, a final round finished him off.

"He was dead. He just didn't know it," Wyckoff said. "It was just all adrenaline."

Wyckoff was helping friends track a wounded bear May 31 on the last day of the hunting season.

Fifteen-year-old Chris Moen of Glide, who had drawn the tag, hit the animal in the shoulder with a .338-caliber rifle round, but he and his father couldn't pick up a trail of blood.

They called on Wyckoff and friends to help track it. A few hours later, Wyckoff went up a hill for a view.

He heard a rustling in the bushes behind him, then a grunt. The bear had apparently circled around the group.

"We never even heard him," said Wyckoff.

Wyckoff said he fired a round into the bear's forehead, but the animal kept coming and climbed on top of him. From beneath, Wyckoff said, he got off three more rounds.

Then he tucked the gun beneath the bear's chin. But it quit. Wyckoff, left-handed, said he had accidentally released the ammunition clip.

After the attack, Wyckoff sat still, not wanting to move for fear the bear had ruptured the femoral artery in his groin. Mustering the courage to look down, he saw his shredded jeans, but not much blood.

At the hospital, a surgeon sewed him up, astonished that the bear had missed every major artery, as well as Wyckoff's tendons.

After two days in the hospital, Wyckoff was discharged, with orders to stay home from work for at least two weeks.

His right arm remains bandaged. Silver staples hold gashes together.

His .45 is covered with teeth marks but still works.

The bear weighed more than 260 pounds after field dressing. It has since been sent to a taxidermist.

Wyckoff said he's grateful for his friends' quick actions and that he stayed firm when his 10-year-old son tried to go along that day.

Would Wyckoff hunt down another bear?

"Oh yeah," he said. "Fall bear season starts back up in August.

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/366777_bearhunt13.html
 

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"His .45 is covered with teeth marks but still works."

Those teeth marks will give it a little more character. ;D
 

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Both those old boys are lucky. On that 2nd story, just wondering if he used FMJ or what.
 

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Gray_Wolf said:
For bear I'd actually want FMJs in my .45ACP; hollow points may not penetrate far enough IMO.
For bear I'd want a .50 cal Desert Eagle and preferably lot's of distance!
 

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Well, of course .45ACP is not the best caliber for bear deffence, but I'd take it over .22 or a rock ;)

At least with FMJ's I can get max penetration, which is something you'll need with bears...
 

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give me a 41 or 44 mag or something bigger like 454 cassul or 460 S&W
 

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im suppressed it took 8 45's to down the bear.. but ya he could have probably moved away and avoided it.. the bear did sound hungry but doesn't sound like he charged right away.

the 2nd guy wow even the 44mag did'nt stop the bear till he was hit directly in the head.

perhaps they should have had something with bit more firepower... maybe "AK47, when you absolutely positively gots to keep them bears from gnawing on your groin.. accept no substitutes!"
 

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fords4life said:
give me a 41 or 44 mag or something bigger like 454 cassul or 460 S&W
...or a 500 Magnum. :p
 

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Bears are wired differently than humans, for one thing their vascular system is vastly slower than us. It could take a direct hit to the heart, you could obliterate it with a magnum round even, and it will take approximately 5 minutes for the thing to die. And a lot of things can happen in 5 minutes. A lot of fishing guides in Alaska if they don't have a .44 or bigger, carry a 12 gauge loaded with slugs. If a bear charges they go for the head, but the slugs will bust the shoulder blade more often in the heat of the moment, that significantly reduces the bears speed and gives the human a chance to take time enough to get a killing shot. When you have an encounter with a bear in Alaska and you end up wounding it, you have to notify state fish and game, then they call in a professional hunter to track it down and finish it, not a job I would want to do.
 

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Having hunted dear for over 30 years in northern Mich. I've had my run in with plenty of black bear most run when you holler but some like humans just have a attitude, This is my woods and I'm going to ruin your day kind of thing. So backing away may or may not work.

I'd feel comfortable with a 45 with FMJ's as back up to my 30.06 but like the 12 gage idea better. we never went anywhere without a 12 gage not to get water or relieve ourselves its just camp law. If we didn't have or rifles with us. I've had a few close calls fired 2 rounds in the ground at a bear at about 20 yards and yes they can run fast 20 yards is to close. he decided to leave but not after a good stare down. To my relief.

I walked within 10 yards of a badger once and they have a major attitude he scared me more then any of the bears have. I put 1 round into the ground at his feet and he attacked the bullet hole and then came after me I did not want to shot him but was left little choice he was one snarling mean badass badger. He was no match for my 06 but after taking the hit he kept coming but I could tell he was done and he died about five feet away. This ruined my deer trip as I don't like killing for the sake of killing. I thought the snarling was a lost farm dog and should have went the other way. Wild animals are just that, they arn't Yogi the friendly bear.
 
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