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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi guys I really need some help! I have a Taurus Judge publix defender. Love the gun. Just bought a ton of Ammon and brought it to the range, never had a problem with it. But today at the range the revolver wheel would not open at all. The range officers looked at it and they were confused. The wheel is locked and won’t move. The hammer doesn’t engage in single action so the wheel doesn’t spin. And if I pull the trigger nothing happens at all when it should be engaging in double action and making the wheel spin. So my gun is like totally jammed and I don’t wanna send it to Miami for them just to do a simple fix if that’s the case. Also don’t want to send it to a gun smith and pay money if I can fix this myself. I can post videos of the problem I am having.

 

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Did you fire a round of .410 and then it jammed?
 

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Welcome to the forum from Northern Illinois. I don't own a Judge and have limited gunsmithing skills, but others here do and will be along shortly. I will say that if it's still loaded, that precludes shipping it anywhere.
 

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This will be a lot easier to discuss if we all use the same nomenclature. The revolver wheel, for example, is called the cylinder.

image.jpg

I'm not (just) saying that and posting this picture to be dogmatic. Given what you're saying, I'd look at the cylinder stop first. If it's bent, that's your problem. Back to Miami, or a good gunsmith.

The part that causes the cylinder to rotate is called the hand. It's typically located just forward of the latch. When you pull the trigger or cock the hammer, the hand moves from a recessed position in the frame, pushes on the cylinder ratchet, and rotates the cylinder into position for the next shot. The hand could be the issue, but it's much harder to see.

One of the issues that can make revolvers lock up about the way you describe is if something is protruding forward of the front face of the cylinder (the face closest to the muzzle). This can happen if a revolver projectile comes loose in the case and creeps forward under recoil. It can also happen in a Judge if the plastic of the top of a fired shotshell protrudes past the face of the cylinder. It's easy to tell if that's happened. If you hold a revolver up broadside (like in the drawing above) with a light source behind it, you should see a small gap between the front face of the cylinder and back end (away from the front sight) of the barrel. That end of the barrel is called the forcing cone in a revolver. If you hold up your Judge and can't see light in that cylinder gap, then dollars to donuts that's the issue; something is protruding, and locking the action just like a steel rod placed down the barrel and into the cylinder.

Had you fired the gun yet when this happened? What size chamber does your Judge have, and did you use the right size shell?

Oh, and finally, if you're still reading, welcome to the forum!
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have never fired .410 shells through it yet. I’ve used high quality 45 long colt through it and it’s always worked just fine. Never had an issue. Thank you all so so much for the replies. The gun is fully unloaded. To my knowledge there is nothing protruding or obstructing anything. They took a look at it at the range and the guy wa s getting frustrated and he said seems to be an internal matter. But he also didn’t seem to knowledgeable. He just kinda tried things here and there and the cylinder didn’t open
 

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Okay, that's useful information. And makes the situation safer than it would be with live ammunition in the cylinder.

When you try to cock the hammer, does it go back but not stay back?

When you try to pull the trigger, does it move, or is it locked up too?
 

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FYI, here's what's inside your Judge. The hand is the dark, vertical piece.

69314d1385958142-dao-judge-not-happy-anymore-10-16-2013-008.jpg

See the spring on the rod behind the trigger? I once got a Taurus revolver that exhibited some of what you're describing. The trigger moved with no resistance. All I had to do was put that spring-loaded rod back into the detent on the back of the trigger. Here's hoping your solution is as easy.

Oh, one more thing; if you decide to take the side plate off, you don't pry it off. You use inertia. If a revolver has a side plate*, you take it off something like this:


*Rugers and some Charter Arms revolvers don't; much of the mechanism is on a subassembly that comes out with the triggerguard for the Rugers, and the triggerguard and grip frame for the Charters.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)


This is my video. The only way I could post the video to this site it through YouTube link. If you want to see a better angle or see a different part of the gun just specify and I will take another video for you to view. Thanks again so much
 

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Okay, that's very helpful. I still don't know a magic fix, but this is informative.

The trigger needs to be fully forward to cock the hammer and advance the cylinder. So I'm not surprised it did nothing when you pulled it at the beginning of the video. When the trigger is partially pulled, being able to spin the cylinder is not surprising. I don't think I have a revolver that doesn't behave that way.

The fact that the cylinder isn't advancing when you cock the hammer has to be an issue with the hand. If it never advanced the cylinder, I'd say the hand is damaged. But you were able to get a single correct double action "shot" once or twice, so the hand isn't totally inoperable.

Here's what I'd suggest; if you are the risk averse, mechanically non-gifted type, I think the odds are very good that a gunsmith could open it up, spot the issue, and have it fixed quickly. Worst case, he needs parts, and then unless he's very skilled, it's back to Miami. Or, if you have a good track record of disassembling things with small, springy parts that like to find dark corners and still successfully getting them back together, you could try opening it up yourself (thereby voiding the warranty, I believe) and seeing if everything looks the way the photo in post seven and whatever other references you can find say it should. You may get lucky like I did; pop one rod back into place, and it works perfectly. Or you may end up sweeping every corner of the room with a magnet to find a tiny, tiny part without which your pistol cannot ever be useful. And then it's back to Miami and no way will it be under warranty.

I'm not trying to scare you, I just want your eyes to be open before you open the tool drawer.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Haha I will never ever open it all up all by myself! I’m honestly so so terrible with all tools and mechanics of any sort sadly. So no way will I ever try to get inside of this thing with no experience at all. If it can easily be fixed by s gun smith I would prefer that if possible and hopefully not too pricey. I don’t wanna send it to Miami and wait for it to come back here if I could just have it fixed pretty quickly at the shop. Thank you very much for your insight. But even if there is a problem with the hand in the gun, why wouldn’t the latch open the cylinder.
 

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If you end up having to send it to Miami, the gunsmith with an FFL license can also save you some money. A licensed FFL can ship USPS where you can't. If you send it UPS or FedEx it has to go overnight to the tune of 50-60 bucks...for them to mail it is maybe 30 bucks.
 
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If the hand is stuck engaged with the ratchet then the cylinder can not be opened out of the frame. Literally.......nothing can be ascertained unless the side plate is removed and the grips removed.
 

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I'd set it in a box until I could find a knowledgeable gunsmith to fix it. Problem is, most of the revolver gurus I know have died off.
 
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Got to be the hand (some manufacturers call it a pawl) at least. The failure-to-open might be cause by a piece of a broken hand locking things up. Send it back, a gunsmith won't have the parts and might not be able to get them.
 

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Call Taurus Customer Service for an authorization number and they will email you a shipping label (you said it was a new purchase?) for free shipping. Take the package to one of those little shipping shops and you are done. Taurus will ship it back to your house, at least they did mine several years ago.

With any new gun, don't try fixing it yourself, send it back. You may void the warranty and it is best if the manufacturer fixes the issue. Turn around is usually just a few weeks.

There was an inspection list around here for revolvers, and it works just as well for new revolvers as it does for used ones. It is a good idea to use this list when looking to purchase a new/used revolver. If you are inexperienced, ask the sales person to check for you as you read off each item.
 
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Haha I will never ever open it all up all by myself! I’m honestly so so terrible with all tools and mechanics of any sort sadly. So no way will I ever try to get inside of this thing with no experience at all. If it can easily be fixed by s gun smith I would prefer that if possible and hopefully not too pricey. I don’t wanna send it to Miami and wait for it to come back here if I could just have it fixed pretty quickly at the shop. Thank you very much for your insight. But even if there is a problem with the hand in the gun, why wouldn’t the latch open the cylinder.
Since you're not mechanically inclined, then the only way to get your revolver fixed is by sending it to Taurus in Miami or finding a good gunsmith to fix the issue. Good Luck
 

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The trigger is not resetting, the hand is not moving forward to engage the cylinder, the cylinder stop is not engaging the cylinder. That said it as to be something in the internal linkage broken or sticking. I didn't watch all the video so are you able to swing the cylinder out or not? If not, the ejector the rod that may have loosened and lengthened which will lock the cylinder into the frame. If it can be screwed back into the cylinder the cylinder will swing out. This rod is reversed thread so beware you don't screw it the wrong way. I have had this happen on S&W revolvers before so I keep a set of small pliers and a strip of leather to turn the ejector rod back into place.
Good Luck,
 

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If the trigger is not returning fully to "reset" then the cylinder release will not move enough to allow the cylinder freedom of movement. S&W, Colt and most other modern revolver lock work systems are designed that way; it's all part of the safe operating system.
I would have had the grips off and the side plate removed almost immediately and it would be clearly obvious to even the most casual observer where the problem originated.
 

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I had the same problem on first use with the .410 ammo. The range person on duty helped by using his rubber head hammer and help knock the cylinder open, which I agreed with before he started, so if anything happened it would be my bad. The root of the problem was quite simple I had purchased 3" .410 ammo, as I should have used 2 1/2" .410 shells. The 3"shells were too long, they fit in the cylinder just fine, but when fired the shell blossoms out and protrudes into the barrel not allowing the cylinder to spin or open.
 
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