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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys! New here..sorry if I dont use all the correct terminology or ask my question as clearly as possible. I will try as best as I can. Just recently purchased a Taurus Millennium Pro compact 3rd gen, 9mm. I dont know if I should be concerned about this but I figured id ask. If I look directly down the barrel (of course the gun is completely unloaded), it seems that in the slide, the barrel is pointing down a little, as if when you cycle the slide, the top of the barrel doesnt touch the inner top of the slide. When I hold the gun from the side evenly, it seems the barrel points straight but I used to own a beretta 92 and it is very different. So im not sure if I should be worried. Havent taken it to the range yet. Thanks in advance guys!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks RW..yeah..I have heard alot of good things about the 3rd gen pro, but have heard bad things about many of the taurus' before them.
 

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dcicero, this seems to be a very common concern among new Milennium Pro owners (It was one of mine). As long as the barrel is not lose (loose, I can't EVER remember which way to spell it. Take your choice) when the slide is brought into full battery; you're fine.

There seems to be a certain amount of "slop" built ino these guns for proper cycling when it's in operation
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
what stage is full battery? when the gun is ready to fire? the barrel is def. a little loose when the slide is back...but so was my beretta a little. when the gun is ready to fire the barrel is not loose though.
 

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Sorry. Yes, when the slide is fully forward and the gun is ready to fire, that is "Full battery".
 

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I have the PT111, and as it was my first semi auto, I got concerned about several things in the cycling of the slide, and barrel positions. Especially when I could barely keep my shots on an 8 1/2 by 11 sheet, and not even the majority were on the sheet.
I did notice the same things your talking about, including a little beveled edge around the slide opening, when the slide is forward and would be ready to fire if loaded.
I had never had a gun where the barrel wound up tilted up like that when the slide locks back. (I had only had a revolver, and a derringer). But as I learned this thing, I fell in love with the handling and am still striving for better accuracy.
 

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it's designed into the slide. if you pull the slide back, the barrel tilts back in the oh-so-famous-1911-fashion. what they did was bevel the hole at the top (or elongate the hole to make it slightly oval-ish, really) so that it would not interfere or rub the top of the barrel when it's back and the barrel is tilted up. i noticed that, too, some time ago and thought the barrel was pointed down. when i pulled the slide back it clicked, as i imagined that extra material being there, that it would have jammed up against the barrel and done all kinds of no-good. the barrel isn't even tilted down, but because the hole is just slighty elongated at the top, it looks that way. form, fit, and function are all fine.

and the barrel will be loose when the slide is back, as the barrel has a wide slot to engage the take-down pin so it will move back a little and tilt back. it's a taurus take on browning's 1911 design.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
awesome guys..thanks for the input..i feel alot better about it now :D didnt even think about the barrel tilting with the slide back.
btw..this forum rocks! :thumb:
 

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good to hear you like this forum. i'm starting to enjoy it more as i snoop around myself. glad to share with you the knowledge that i have stolen from other people.

yeah, it tilts up like the 1911. it's called the 'delayed blowback' design, where the barrel and slided are locked together either by lugs (2 or 3 in the original browning design) that lock into the inside of the slide or, in our case with the milleniums and 24/7s, the ledge on the chamber part of the barrel that presses against the slide opening.

when the slide cycles back in recoil, it pushes the barrel back with it, only about 1/8 inch or so. you can see this by taking the barrel out and putting the take-down pin in the groove of the under-barrel lugs as if it were all on the frame and then move the pin back and forth axially with the barrel.

then, as the slide continues, the chamber of the barrel falls down and the muzzle rises up. this lowers the feed ramp to the next round making the round more coaxial with the barrel allowing for a smoother feed. if you have a straight blow back gun (my favorite being the bersa 380) where the barrel is integral to the frame, you can pull the slide back and see how high the next round is, nearly coaxial to the barrel to allow a smoother feed.

back to the delayed-blowback. as the slide move foward into battery (slide fully locked foward against the barrel), the slide pushes the round into the chamber, the back face pushing against the back of the barrel 'shroud' and pushes the barrel foward, tilting it back down and the slide locks against the barrel.

it's such a great design, if browning hadn't come up with it, someone surely would have, and the 1911-lovers would be 19-something-else-lovers.
 
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