Taurus Firearm Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I have shot rifles all of my life but have never owned a pistol. My wife has never shot a gun, but is a 6 ft. tall Texas woman. We have been talking about getting a gun for some range shooting and home defense. I wanted a smaller semi-auto, maybe a 9mm. But, the other day we wandered into a local pawn shop and came across a pair of small Tauruses: a black 738 and a pink 732. My wife fell in love with the pink one and I thought the black one looked decent if a bit small. Hoping the shop might cut me a deal on the pair I am pretty interested. Unfortunately, I do not really know much about semi-autos and have never even heard of Taurus before. So, what do you think? OK guns for semi-auto beginners, or should we look elsewhere?
 

·
Member Emeritus 1946-2018
Joined
·
35,996 Posts
The PT738 TCP is a fine pistol for deep concealed carry purposes, but I will say that the recoil is rather snappy if you intend to use it very much as a range pistol.

Many on this forum have the little pistols and swear by them for concealed carry purposes.

More of our forum friends will be weighing in on this shortly.

It is my pleasure to welcome you to the forum. :D

008 - TCP outside tilted up.JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,961 Posts
Welcome from TX! While the pocket pistols like the 732 & 738 are excellent for concealed carry, for range time and home defense I suggest you get a larger pistol like the 24/7, 24/7 C, 709, 740, Ruger SR9, SR9c, SR40, SR40c etc. especially for beginners.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,139 Posts
Welcome to Taurus Armed, leolson! :cool:

I agree with Taurus10. The TCP has its place, but as a first gun for extended range practice or home defense I would choose larger pistols or revolvers first.

Of course, if you just want to get those TCPs for future use and get another gun to for both of you to get used to handguns, that is not a bad thing either. The little TCP 732 is a sweet shooter compared to the the .380 firing TCP 738, yet the 738 is not too bad either. There are definitely much better range and home defense guns though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,139 Posts
Yup, what they all said above. If you are looking for concealed carry pistols these are fine. For a new shooter and for range shooting, I would also suggest a revolver is a good way to start. A good double action 38 Special/.357 magnum, 4" or 6" barrel, would give you a wide range of ammo choices from meek and mild to hot and wild. If you learn to shoot a double action revolver, using the double action, you'll be able to easily master the trigger pull on just about any pistol. Revolvers also make good choices for home defense. If your wife likes pink there are many revolvers that accept after market grips in many different colors including pink.

Finally, welcome to the forum!
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
32,706 Posts
Let's look at this from another angle.

As said you have no experience with semi-autos. SO! :)

How about getting one or both, basic semi-auto Pistol shooting class through the Programs or from the NSSF - National Shooting Sports Foundation . With one of these you both can get a good education of what type of gun/caliber combination will work for each of you.

Take the Basic Revolver course as well. Once you both have a education about those then you decide which is for each of you,revolver or pistol.

Getting and learning how to use a .22lrf pistol can go in concert with your classes. For that Ruger,Browning, Beretta, or S&W can fill the bill. Try as many out as you can and pick what works for each of your needs. Doesn't have to be a high priced gun to start with. With these learn the basics of marksmanship with these. This will transfer over to centerfire handguns when you two go to them.

As for revolvers Ruger,Taurus and S&W, and Charter Arms make some very good rimfires. I have Taurus rimfire revolvers but as of late the Charter Arms 22s with 4 inch barrels caught my eye as well made guns. Budget priced at that.

Some people do start right off with the centerfire handguns. Nothing wrong with that. Two ideas on this.

1.) Start with the the mild .38 Special rounds in a 4 inch barreled gun or with the 9x19 pistol cartridge in a medium to full size pistol.Try as many brands ,types,makes,and models of pistols and revolvers to see what fits you each.
Well educated credentialed instructors and store personnel can assist here.

The idea is not to rush into this. Take your time and collect experience and knowledge about as much as possible. With a good rounded basic knowledge then you can make good choices.

I can recommend the PT732 and 738 for CCW and for defense but first things first. Those two might be wrong for your needs.

Taurus has the 24/7 G2 series, Glock has the model 19, or 17, Ruger has the P95 or SR9, S&W has the SD9 or M&P series, SIG has the new 250 series, Taurus has the PT92 full size DA/SA pistols, Beretta has the Px4 and 92 series,etc., and so on. All of these have a different trigger type from one another. Each trigger type will need to be learned or not.
115gr.-124gr. FMJ or round nosed standard pressure ammo for practice suffices.

For revolvers Taurus,Ruger,and S&W make good basic .38 Special or .357 magnum revolvers. I would go with a 4 inch barrel on the gun. Best balance and good ballistics. Could be different for you two.

The .38 Special with standard pressure 132gr. rounds, Federal Nyclad 125gr. rounds, or 148gr wadcutters will suffice for practice.

Let's look at your method of starting out right away with the 738 and 732. It can be done. Just that some instruction and having a good mentor along side to give constructive criticism is a good idea.

Let it be also recommended that you both try Taurus and other brands of mini-semi-autos to see what fits each of you and your individual needs.

For example, I do have a Taurus 732. The 738 and other .380ACP mini-pistols kick too much for me,my arm,wrist,and arm. The 732 does not. I'm short,have small hands, and short fingers.BUT, and it's a big but. No snickering..... I heard that, I also own a Beretta 3032 and a North American Arms Guardian. All in .32 ACP!

Most mini.380ACP guns have a harsh kick. There are some for whom it is not a problem and for many it is.

The Beretta has a tip up barrel for easy loading and unloading. There's no reason to rack the slide to do either.
The NAA Guardian is an excellent product, but I like the trigger on the 732 and Beretta a bit better. Personal choice and need.

For the Taurus 738, it is a reliable gun. So are the competition. Take a look at the other brands as well and see what fits you both,again. :) If you don't buy a Taurus no one gets lynched. Black helicopters maybe, but nothing else. :):rolleyes: That last part is over the top. :)

Next step up is a compact .380ACP pistol like the Bersa 380 single stack, Taurus PT138 double stack, CZ 83, Beretta 84 or 85, or something like them. A lot of people here have one or the other and probably a few not mentioned, but you get the picture.

You might find that the mini-9x19 psitols fit your needs better. The Taurus 709 has a double recoil spring assembly that helps absorb some of the recoil. I own one. Nice gun and user friendly. Other brands,makes,and models need to be looked at. The ones with double recoil springs do absorb more of the recoil than the ones that do not. Recoil is not harsh IMHO. Better cartridge,more power, and decent hitting power.

If not the mid size or compact pistols in 9x19 are great. For example, I own a Taurus PT111 Mil Pro. Taurus 24/7 are in the same class. So is the Ruger SR9c. Yep,got one. Other brands should also be considered.

SIG has the 239,240,and 250 series. Most single stack guns are now used models. Got several SIG 225s. S&W has the 908 or 3913.

That's my 2 pence worth.
Penny - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia :D:rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,781 Posts
If you plan to use these as your CCW, practice with what you intend to carry ..... I find the TCP a lot of fun to shoot.. I like the snap....
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
17,735 Posts
The only reason I have one is for concealed carry, otherwise there's better choices for home defense and sport shooting that will work better for both of you. I do not find the 738 fun to shoot, at least for very long. There's lots of pink guns around these days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
I guess I have a different experience with the TCP than everyone else so far. I don't find it a pain to shoot at all. My little carry pistol has a handle that fits almost everyone's hand better than the Ruger or the KelTec offerings, so it's "not too bad" at the range when you're trying to become proficient.

Having said that, I agree with what others have said about a larger pistol or even a revolver. I started with a S&W .38 special. Still have it. It's a nice piece.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
What an unbiased brand independent recommendation. That's why this website is the best. I am a proud member and owner of a PT-111, PT-709 and newly purchased PT-732.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,813 Posts
I don't consider this a Taurus 738/732 question, but rather a micro pistol question. I would not recommend a micro pistol of any make as a pistol for beginners. First these very small automatics require much more from the shooter than any of the larger pistols. If you consider the essential 3 parts to successful shooting, the pistol, the shooter and the ammo, these little guns put a premium on the shooter and ammo, but especially the shooter. Just holding one of them improperly may be enough for them not to operate reliability, while a larger auto will trooper on like nothing is wrong. Once you get a micro pistol working reliably and accurate for you, it may not work at all for someone else. That is why many of us refer to these little micro pistols as personal sidearms. That is also why most of us recommend a larger pistol to learn the basics of carry, draw, hold, stance, trigger control and ammo selection. Its the same reason behind putting your kid on a more forgiving motorcycle, rather than starting them out with a lightweight race bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,358 Posts
My daughter learned to shoot w/ the 738. So it can be done. But, having instruction in properly shooting the smaller pistols is important, like everybody is saying...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
597 Posts
One thing that hasnt been brought up yet is the used gun aspect. Nothing wrong with a used gun by any means, however I commomly see these micro .380 of various brands in pawn shops with prices that equal or are even higher than new ones.
Point 2. If you really want these 2 weapons by all means get them, and then get some imstruction.

I would recommend a larger weapon for beginners revovers come in all shapes sizes and calibers oh and colors even including pink, blue, red, green and others.
If you are set on semi auto weapons the Taurus line is very strong. For a first timer though I would recommend the Springfield XD and XDM series. I base that on all the goodies that come witj those weapons. Included are holster, 2 magazines, double magazine pouch hard pelican case and standard book and such. For the money to begin shootimg this system comes with everything you need to go shoot except the ammo. It comes in 9mm, .40 s&w and .45 ACP. They are also now available in compact sizes and simgle stack .45.
I am a .45 type of guy so thats what I would recommend. The 9mm will be better suited for a beginner though both in recoil and price of ammunition.
Just my .02
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36,780 Posts
Interestingly the MOST used (barely used) pistols that i see for sale here pretty much goes in #1 position the new super lightweight 357 magnum revolvers,#2 the micro 380's,#3 the super small lightweight 38 specials,#4 and the lightweight small 9 mm's.
I think this tells a tale of many jumping on the small ,light weapon and finding out theres a lot more to it than size and weight and being the correct weapon.
its very seldom that you see a full/mid sized semi auto or revolver thats not well used for sale, of course some of this has to do with actual numbers sold as well.
while its alluring to have a weapon of such small stature and weight and being very powerful for its size the truth is they most all are difficult at best to fire, more so to fire enough to become proficient without devleoping bad habits from the recoil and function problems.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top