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I just bought a used Taurus 531 special revolver...got it for $150.00 and seems to be in excellant shape....I would like to find a way to smooth out the trigger and action....has anyone...have any suggestions...for this....our local gun smith....says he can work on trigger ect for around $60.00 plus parts (spring sets i guess)...any imput would be appreciated....also comments on the quality of these revolvers...by the way..the serial # indicates it was made in 1994.
 

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http://www.gunblast.com/Poorboy.htm
I've done this (without the spring adjustment) to all of my revolvers (M85, M94, M65) that I could (My M650 has the internal hammer) and it did help. And it's free!

The other reliable method of smoothing out the trigger is to dry fire it, lots. But there could be some assorted junk in the action as well. I'd hold off on the trigger job but maybe have the gunsmith do a serious cleaning (including removing the side plate and cleaning the internals) and see how it does then.

Steelheart
 

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Steelheart said:
http://www.gunblast.com/Poorboy.htm
I've done this (without the spring adjustment) to all of my revolvers (M85, M94, M65) that I could (My M650 has the internal hammer) and it did help. And it's free!

The other reliable method of smoothing out the trigger is to dry fire it, lots. But there could be some assorted junk in the action as well. I'd hold off on the trigger job but maybe have the gunsmith do a serious cleaning (including removing the side plate and cleaning the internals) and see how it does then.

Steelheart
I went to the site and I don't quite understand the marrying the trigger section.

"Next, while applying upward pressure with your thumb to the cocked hammer, pull the trigger. You need to apply a good deal of pressure with that thumb. Repeat this step a few times until the trigger pull feels smooth and the gritty feel of the new trigger pull is gone. "

It seems like if you are pushing up on the hammer and pulling the trigger, you are just dry firing. If you push "up" from behind, doesn't the hammer just go forward as normal? Let me know what I am misssing.
thanks,
eggman with a Taurus M94 .22lr
 

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Eggman,
What is happening during this procedure is the two parts that are in contact with each other are being forced together to wear the rough surfaces into each other.
Example=Taking two sticks that have bark on them and rubbing them together, eventually the rough bark wears of and you have two smoother surfaces where the sticks contact each other. This is the idea, anyway.
The pressure on the hammer is to get the surfaces to "mate" faster.
Hope this helps.
 

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I understand what I am trying to accomplish but just don't understand the
actual process. It seems like the hammer will just fly forward away from your thumb
when you pull the trigger. How do you push up on it at the same time and have
it help wear the parts?
I have to admit, I have not tried it yet, as I want to wait till I have some
snap caps for the M94.
 

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I shot a S&W .357 today that had trigger modifications done to it. I was really smooth. BUT when it came time to actually shooting the thing, the trigger was so light it would go off without much noticeable resistance. It was so light, it went off before I was on target.

I guess what I am saying is, be careful and make sure you are getting it the way you want it and not to light a trigger. Personally, I like the heavier trigger.
 

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I am just hoping or a slightly lighter trigger that wearing in will achieve. I am
not going for any modifications, as with removing a spring clip on one side.
However, since it is reversible and I can do it myself, I would not mind
seeing what it does. I don't believe I would leave it that way.

My M94 .22 is mostly used for farm duties, putting down livestock and
small predators. That is usually done single action, single shot anyway.
 

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All you are doing with the hammer is pressing it into the sear while it is cocked, after it clears the sear you start over.
Don't know that I would let it fall all the way into fire position.
It will work but takes time, like breaking it an engine, it lets the parts 'wear in'.
The options are to leave it alone, do the trigger job yourself, or pay a smith to do it for you.
Gunsmithing is is a learned skill that some people get quickly and some do not
 

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fritz said:
All you are doing with the hammer is pressing it into the sear while it is cocked, after it clears the sear you start over.
Don't know that I would let it fall all the way into fire position.
It will work but takes time, like breaking it an engine, it lets the parts 'wear in'.
The options are to leave it alone, do the trigger job yourself, or pay a smith to do it for you.
Gunsmithing is is a learned skill that some people get quickly and some do not
How would you prevent it from falling into the fired position if your thumb is behind the hammer and pushing? I have now tried it and I don't imagine I am doing this correctly. I am pretty mechanical, but I am not getting this.
 

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Just put something between the hammer and the firing pin. That way if your thumb slips you won't be in a dry fire situation. The point is to just smooth it out a bit.
 

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TheGunMan said:
Just put something between the hammer and the firing pin. That way if your thumb slips you won't be in a dry fire situation. The point is to just smooth it out a bit.
Do you push the hammer towards the trigger/sear and not "up" as it says in the
description? The "up" part just does not make sense to me as the hammer already wants to go up (in an arc on its way to the fire position) from the fully cocked position.
 

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My understanding is you try and force the hammer to the fire position while pulling the trigger. That would add weight to the pull and eventually smooth the action some. Kinda like shooting more ammo.
 

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:D THAT would be my 1st choice. :shooter:
 

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A video would have been preferable in describing this, but think of it this way, when pulling the trigger, the hammer comes towards you before it goes forward. So, during the time you "pull" the trigger, you also are pushing the hammer away from you until it comes to the point where it releases and then goes forward. this extra pressure will cause it to seat in quicker than just pulling the trigger alone. It is like chewing gum and rubbing your belly and patting your head at the same time. some people have a nack for it, some dont.
 

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If you trust your gunsmith, give him a shot and see what happens. I had Magnaport do an action job on my Charter Arms 357, and the difference was night and day -- and that on a revolver that had a pretty good trigger to begin with.
 
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