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Greetings,

Is there any issue to use lead reloads with the Taurus 24/7 pro 9mm or I need to use FMJ reloads?

Thank you
 

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I'm not certain about the 24/7, but I had a problem in my PT111 Mil Pro. After about 60 rds of 115 gr. LRN I had one jamb up in the chamber. Locked up the slide just shy of closed. I finally managed to get the slide closed and re-opened only to eject an unfired case with the bullet firmly lodged in the end of the chamber. I had to remove the bullet with a .350" dia. brass rod. I consider myself lucky as no one got hurt, there was no Kaboom, and no damage to the gun. I fired over 250 of this same batch thru a Ruger P89 without a hitch. I guess the PT111 just didn't like them.
 

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#1) Does not your Owners Manual state that the use of reloads, or re-manufacured ammo will void your waranty? My PT 92 manual does.
#2) Does not the bare lead totally foul your barrel, and leave a residue all over?
 

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drummin_man627 said:
#1) Does not your Owners Manual state that the use of reloads, or re-manufacured ammo will void your waranty? My PT 92 manual does.
I don't know of a manufacturer that doesn't include that statement as well as "Always use ammunition that complies with the industry performance standards established by the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers Institute, Inc., of the United States, (SAAMI) or the equivalent from other countries." Weapons are built to handle the the pressures from these loads. Get someone who, for whatever reason, loads above these stds., and serious overpressure can lead to catastrophic results. I don't know anyone willing to waranty against that, however, if you reload following proven recipes, start 10% low slowly working up to max closely monitoring the powder charge, you shouldn't have any problems.

#2) Does not the bare lead totally foul your barrel, and leave a residue all over?
Quality cast bullets are rarely made from pure lead as it is too soft. Most are an alloy of lead, antimony, tin, and zink I believe. The antimony and tin for hardness and durability and zink for lubrication all of which help prevent lead fouling of the barrel. You also want to know the size of the barrel since there can be as much as .002-3" oversize due to manufacturing tollerances and wear, loading the right size bullet for your barrel will reduce fouling.

This is just info I've gathered from my limited experience. Of course, there are plenty of people here that know far more than me and I'm sure if I've put out any bad info, someone point that out soon enough.
 

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If you cast, try a 105 grain .357" Lee mold, a SWC. Size it to .357 or .356. It casts .358". This bullet is accurate in everything I've fired it out of, 9mm, .38, or .380. It has a LONG nose that feeds very reliably even though it's a rather sharp flat point. I've fired this thing reliably in several .380s including a cheap, cheap Davis. I shot it out of two Chi Com Tokarev 9mms without a blip, out of my Kel Tec P11 and my Ruger P85. Don't have a Taurus, but this bullet has proven itself for me in a variety of guns and calibers. I load it very light in everything except the .380. I have a hot load for it in .380. It might just be a good choice in .380 for that ballance of good penetration and tissue damage.
 

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Back in the early 90's I shot almost nothing but 124 grn cast RN's and FP's out of my Taurus PT92 with absolutely no problems whatsoever, and also did so with 9mm Pistols of other manufacturers. I would expect the PT24/7 Pro to be no different!

I generally used WST or Alliant Green Dot and kept velocities to about 1,050 fps.

These days, for IPSC Match Shooting, I use the Berry's 9mm 124 grn Plated FP Bullets exclusively, but I could go back to using Cast Lead Bullets if I had to.
 
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