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I relatively new to handguns even though I did four years in the Army. The only weapon I ever qualified with was an M16..

My question is this. Suppose I want to qualify myself in an informal kind of way, what kind of target should I use and how far should it be?

At the rage I go to they have the standard black silhouettes and then they have one with four small round targets on it.

Also, I notice I am much better with my 24/7 than I am with the smaller PT111. I suspect this is natural that smaller guns are tougher to put on target?
 

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primemover said:
I relatively new to handguns even though I did four years in the Army. The only weapon I ever qualified with was an M16..

My question is this. Suppose I want to qualify myself in an informal kind of way, what kind of target should I use and how far should it be?

At the rage I go to they have the standard black silhouettes and then they have one with four small round targets on it.

Also, I notice I am much better with my 24/7 than I am with the smaller PT111. I suspect this is natural that smaller guns are tougher to put on target?

Work inside your comfort zone.....distance and target type make no difference. Extend your range and choose targets to suit as your proficiency grows.
 

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Just keep your goals simple. I figure that at any distance I can score hits on a 9 inch paper plate, or a standard sheet of notebook (computer) paper will get the job done. I believe that 7 yards is considered to be a suficiant distance for most situations. I rarely shoot more than 30 feet. Of course when I get better, I'll try to go for longer distances.
 

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Primemover. Rawhide has it right and so do you. Drumminman is as well.

It has been suggested by the gun gurus and writers that a practice session have goals.
Each session should have a purpose rather than just firing off 50 or more rounds.
Certain specifics should be addressed in the planning. Not a lot of factors, but just a few. Keep them reasonable.

Hold on the gun,stance,grip, breath control, trigger pull need to be considered. All this may be obvious, but have to be addressed. Just a few things should be tried out or used as goals.That way things do not get overly complicated or too much to keep track of. Work on a couple one session and then when those are accomplished move on with another couple.

Starting at short range and on bullseyes of large or medium size are acceptable. Close range shooting as well. 10- 15 feet or a little further. As you get experience and become better then increase the distance and set new goals.

Firing at 25 yards or more does need to be a skill eventually even if close defense encounters are usually much closer.

Long distance shooting and only having a handgun for the defense scenario happen enough and are documented.

And if competing or hunting with a handgun, those long range skills will be needed.

Having a knowledgeable mentor or two who can give constructive criticism as to your shooting technique and performance from time to time can help sharpen your skills as well.

This is especailly needed in the early stages of learnig to shoot handguns.

Smaller pistols are harder to shoot well as you have surmised. Longer sight radius, more mass to absorb recoil, more area to grip,easier to hold steady on target, and other factors make the larger or mid frame guns much more shooter friendly.

NRA or basic courses are also available at most local reputable gun shops, clubs, and ranges. Guys have a ego problem sometimes that keeps them from availing themselves of these. Ask around or go to www.nra.org and click on Education and Training. There is also a NRA Affiliated Clubs section to click on.

Even shooting competition can help even the early beginners. For example, IDPA has beginner classes at times prior to a person actually participating in a match. People are more than willing to help the new arrivals. Competition can be for fun or serious. Or a little of both.

So these are some things you can do without this getting more long winded than this is already. ;D
 

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Quiks Draw said it pretty well. Start short (5-7 yards). When you get consistent, increase distance. Longer distances magnify shooting flaws and firearm inaccuracy.
 

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A lot of good information from the others, but if I may.Keep the range short and the firing SLOW, by going slow you will be able to determine where you need further work.
At first only shoot for the center of the target, and try not to be upset with the group size, all will come after practice hth Doug
 
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