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I found out what happens when you don't have powder in a shell. No bang, not even a snap.
Gun was jammed and I had a hard time clearing it. Stopped immediately and gave it to the gunsmith who was able
to clear the barrel in minutes. Now I've got 28 shells that I don't trust. I guess I'll take the time to take them
apart and start over. I knew I had to look for the powder but I guess my attention was not where it should have been.
The problem began when I was trying to load "Blazer" ammo not realizing that it took small primers. Thankfully
no damage was done and lesson learned.
 

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Better than an overloaded round, for sure. Visually inspect, visually inspect, visually inspect. ;)

Makes a nice little pop sound, doesn't it?
 

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Yep squibs suck. Almost ruined a M&P barrel with one once. Had to beat that sucker out.
 

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They can surprise you, I had one in my G2 in some Magtech factory loaded ammo. It had enough powder to cycle the slide but not clear the barrel. It sounded strange and smoked a lot so I immediately stopped, dropped the magazine and cleared the chamber. This one was stuck hard about half way down the barrel and had to get beaten out. Just goes to show you need to pay attention when shooting and know what to expect and stop when it does not happen.
 

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Had one in my Model 66 - fortunately, I heard (or didn't hear!) the pop instead of a bang. Bullet moved about 3/4" down the barrel. I was able to knock it out with a dowel. It caused me to completely change how I reload - as said: inspect, inspect, inspect. And then inspect again.
 

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This is one of the things I really want to avoid. So my reloading process is slower than others. I size/deprime, expand the case neck. Then pull case and hand prime and charge with Lee perfect powder measure. Then load bullet onto case and put back into turret for bullet seating then crimp. Like I said, it takes longer but it is much easier to inspect.
 

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My first squib occurred during my first 50 reloads. I knew it when it happened and luckily it was an easy problem to fix. Previously, I would place all my shells in a reloading tray, charge all of them with powder, place the bullets, then seat all the bullets in the reloading press. Intermittantly I would weigh the charges to make sure the charges were accurate. My best guess is that I weighed the charge from one shell and when it came time to recharge the case I charged the one next to it and left the initial case empty. Keep in mind I just as easily could have gotten a double charge. This caused me to re-think the way I charge my cases. Now I charge each case, visually check it to make sure it has powder, and then place the bullet, so there is no chance of a double charge or a no charge case. If you are not getting the results you want, re-think what you are doing, and change the way you are doing it until you get the proper results.
 

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I found out what happens when you don't have powder in a shell. No bang, not even a snap.
Gun was jammed and I had a hard time clearing it. Stopped immediately and gave it to the gunsmith who was able
to clear the barrel in minutes. Now I've got 28 shells that I don't trust. I guess I'll take the time to take them
apart and start over. I knew I had to look for the powder but I guess my attention was not where it should have been.
The problem began when I was trying to load "Blazer" ammo not realizing that it took small primers. Thankfully
no damage was done and lesson learned.
Thanks much for sharing your experience with us so that we can be watchful and hopefully not make the same mistake! :thumb:
 

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When I was around 18 I reloaded a lot but when I went to teach a friend his head was not in it and he loaded a few double 44 mags that broke some screws on my gun.
I stopped reloading with him and just did not have a good set up at home, He had a nice barn with a great bench. But he was dangerous. Reloading is something you have to be vary careful with and have supper concentration.
 

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Squibs are not always as easy to spot as the one below.

Over the past 6 + decades I've seen barrels with as many as 5 or 6 slugs stuck in them.

How anyone can do this is beyond me...



 

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I have seen three back to back, but never 5 or 6. The best way to get one out is a brass rod. A wooden dowel can splinter, jam up between the nose of the bullet and the barrel and really foul things up.

I use an LNL, and before that a Projector. I love the ergonomics of the press, but also like the fact that I can see into the case as I seat a bullet. (I do have to lean in a little on some)

I see every single powder charge I seat a bullet over. EVERY SINGLE ONE. That will save you on double charges (Although I have never had one of those), and also on missing charges. I have managed that a couple of times, but thanks to seeing each charge, they were caught before I loaded a bullet into the case.

Use some method of verifying the correct charge exists in every case. Some folks use a powder cop die, some of us look into every single case, and some do both, but do something. Squibs can be very dangerous, although often times it only results in two stuck bullets or a bulged (ringed) barrel.

Double and triple charges, or magnum loads fired after a squib, can wreck your whole day.

Here is an example. (This pic has floated around the net for awhile)
 

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while I am fairly new to reloading, a poster on another forum suggested that a last step he follows is to "weigh" each completed bullet as it comes off the press. with a didital scale it only takes a sec or less and quickly spots any major problems such as partial powder drops or no powder drops. made such good sense that I have caught several "mistakes" that I have made. at least it didnt get to the point of embarassing me at the range anyways!
 

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a poster on another forum suggested that a last step he follows is to "weigh" each completed bullet as it comes off the press
It won't work. There are too many variations in bullet and brass weights to know if you put in 2.7 or 3.2 or 5.4 Grs of Bullseye. Rifle is just as bad. It just won't work. Get out your scale and try it.

SEE every charge you seat a bullet over.
 

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while I am fairly new to reloading, a poster on another forum suggested that a last step he follows is to "weigh" each completed bullet as it comes off the press. with a didital scale it only takes a sec or less and quickly spots any major problems such as partial powder drops or no powder drops. made such good sense that I have caught several "mistakes" that I have made. at least it didnt get to the point of embarassing me at the range anyways!
I look and make sure there is powder, before putting the bullet on. I've adjusted the fingers out of the way on my Lee Pro 1000, so twice per tube (~ every 10 rounds), I pull a primed case out, tare it, charge it, then weigh it. I don't think the method above is foolproof, as I've found cases to be 6-7 grains lighter than other cases. That's a problem, because with a 7 grain charge, a light case might weigh empty even if it is correctly charged.
 

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I look and make sure there is powder, before putting the bullet on. I've adjusted the fingers out of the way on my Lee Pro 1000, so twice per tube (~ every 10 rounds), I pull a primed case out, tare it, charge it, then weigh it. I don't think the method above is foolproof, as I've found cases to be 6-7 grains lighter than other cases. That's a problem, because with a 7 grain charge, a light case might weigh empty even if it is correctly charged.
I might question your result depending on what you are reloading. Let us look at a 45 APC or even a 45 colt..using brass that is all the same brand and age (lets say once fired, for instance) the brass should weigh with in 1-1.5 grains variance, any more and the manufactuers quality control sucks as they are wasting brass which cost a good bit in todays market. using a bullet of 200 grains all same lot, again the varances should'nt be over 1-1.5 grains, again quality controll! primer weight is too small to count. so the only other varance is the powder. at say 5.5 grains of powder, you should be throwing less than .3 varance. any more and you could have a problem, adding that all up we see a average max varance of around 3 grains. most manufactures aim for a variance of 4 grains +/- in finished product.

as a reloader i would expect that one would want to hold the total weight variance to under 1% relative to total cartridge weight to have good quality ammo. Six grains total variance for a .458 Win Mag shooting 500 grain cast bullets might be acceptable; but for a .223 Remington, or a .45 ACP Bullseye target load, obviously not.

of course MAYBE I just expect more from myself? of course I did say as a last step! the LOOK to see the powder charge is just prior to placing the bullet in the case mouth for seating!
 

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If you have consistent brass, I suppose weighing finished cartridges does serve a purpose. I reload mixed range pickups, so I get a wide spread in empty case weight.
 

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I was discussing this question with a friend who casts their own bullets..he says when he casts for a 250 gn bullet he keeps all between 245-260 gn. this alone would give the diffrence suggested above 4 gns!

in manufacturing for retail a 5gn diffrence dont seem like much..but if 10,000 bullets are cast a hr. each at 5gn over then that comes to 50,000 gn lost or 200 bullets per hour lost for retail sales! 8hr shift times 200= 1600 bullets a day that could have been made..over a year that would come too...1600 x 5 days per wk x 4.33 to come to a average month= 34640 bullets a month! time 12 months...415680 bullets or 103920000 grains lost!

if bullets sell for 20 bucks a 100 then lost revenue per year could be 83,136.00 revenue per year! hence the strict quality control ammo manufactures try to stick to! each grain "lost" then potentually would cost the company .0008 cents, not much but it does add up! so I assume the bullets loaded are all within the 1% variable

I think I did my math right, please recheck it for yourself.
 

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Wow, 245-260 seem like a big range. I don't cast yet, but have been considering it. Is that a normal weight range for home casting?
 

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variations in weights will be a lot of what you are loading and how!
For example when i use to do a bit of bench shooting then you would order Match projectiles which are more closely regulated as to dimensions and weight, even then you would litterly weigh each projectile ,and of course individually weight each powder charge, and the brass was matched brass as well.
you likely could weigh the finished product and be nearly identical in weight.
But when you use standard projectiles , a powder measure and mixed brass there can be a lot of variance, 5-6 grains seems like more than i would accept/expect in my reloads though?
as i use the batch system then all cases are primered off the press, then they are upside down in the laoding block, they move through the powder charging die and are inverted top up, after 50 are loaded they are visually checked under good light for powder level, every 12-15 are hand weighed, then as they go back through the press to have the projectile seated they are visually checked again for powder level, then finally factory crimped and placed in the box and labeled.
a little time consuming ? yes! but to date no squibbs and no hot loads!
just my way of doing it!
 
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