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The stuff of nightmares. He's extremely lucky to be alive to tell the tale.
 

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Sen it. Don't need to see it again. TERRIBLE!!!!!
 

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Holy crap!!!!!

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About 42 years ago, I saw a .44 Mag revolver explode and shred a guys hand up. Nothing nearly as bad as this deal was. He was shooting out in the desert outside Las Vegas and he had just bought the gun, I think it was a Llama Super Comanche. The gun was not at fault, his handloads were all messed up. The Anaconda exploding video that was on YT pretty close to what happened that day. We put the guy into my friend's Bronco (OJ Style) and took him to the hospital. He lost a couple of fingers and had nerve damage so what fingers he had left didn't really work right for a long time. A hunk of the cylinder just missed his buddy next to him. The police had an expert check out the ammo he had ready to put in the gun and it was way out there in pressure. I have some .357 handloads that an old guy I know made and I think I'm going to pull the bullets and dump the powder.
 

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.50 BMG rounds come in many flavors. Lots can happen with questionable ammo. With a rig that robust I think I'd stick with handloads.
 

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I was pretty ho-hum about this video until at one point the guy turns and I see the line of staples running down the side of his neck and into his chest area. Holy Cow!
 

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This one was the ultimate kaboom how to create a stick of dynamite with your 50 caliber rifle


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Standard .50 bmg runs at 55,000 psi. Mark serbu said for it to break pressure would have to be over 85,000 psi. My question is how are you going to sell a rifle that can't at LEAST handle a double powder load. We knew 200 years ago not to proof a gun if it won't handle a triple powder load. Somebody owes this man a brand new rifle, some paid medical bills, and a bottle of nice scotch. If your gun can't handle an extra 35% of pressure you ain't got no buisness charging thousands of dollars for it.
 

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Standard .50 bmg runs at 55,000 psi. Mark serbu said for it to break pressure would have to be over 85,000 psi. My question is how are you going to sell a rifle that can't at LEAST handle a double powder load. We knew 200 years ago not to proof a gun if it won't handle a triple powder load. Somebody owes this man a brand new rifle, some paid medical bills, and a bottle of nice scotch. If your gun can't handle an extra 35% of pressure you ain't got no buisness charging thousands of dollars for it.
I don't disagree with you - except for your math.
85kpsi in a rifle rated for a 55kpsi round is 54.5% over-pressure - not 35% over-pressure.
Still far less than it should be able to handle.
 

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I don't disagree with you - except for your math.
85kpsi in a rifle rated for a 55kpsi round is 54.5% over-pressure - not 35% over-pressure.
Still far less than it should be able to handle.

OK!
I was under the assumption that ANY post that required Math should be marked "WARNING" so we public School Graduates would not waste our time opening it?
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Standard .50 bmg runs at 55,000 psi. Mark serbu said for it to break pressure would have to be over 85,000 psi. My question is how are you going to sell a rifle that can't at LEAST handle a double powder load. We knew 200 years ago not to proof a gun if it won't handle a triple powder load. Somebody owes this man a brand new rifle, some paid medical bills, and a bottle of nice scotch. If your gun can't handle an extra 35% of pressure you ain't got no buisness charging thousands of dollars for it.
I disagree. There would be little worth owning, if the standard of safety was 200% of the design. Do you want a 6lb. carry gun? 16lb. hunting rifle?

Everything I have found on Proof testing is in the 25-30% range, not doubled. Many companies don't "allow" +P+ ammo to be shot in their guns.
I'm sure Scott is a nice guy, but what he was doing in this video, was not smart.
The ammo used in the video was unknown, he wasn't sure where it came from, if it was new or reloaded.

I'm glad he's going to be okay, but if there is any blame here, it falls on the shooter. IMO
 

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Mystery ammo is always suspect. Most of the reloaded stuff I've shot over the years has been on the weak side, some of it almost laughably weak, but a couple of times it wasn't anything close to what was claimed it was, going by the label on the bags of it. Since then, I've been on the paranoid side, and usually pulled the bullets.
 

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The "S" in SLAP stands for "sabot." That should have been a clue. The military learned the hard way that when used in conjunction with a muzzle brake, the sabot can strip and become lodged in the brake, right up until ...... boom!
 

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"Brush with death" doesn't even do that video justice. Wow. He really is blessed to be alive.

I've seen a reference that says those are 55,000 psi rounds. That's actually less than .308, which has a SAAMI standard of 62,000. Heck, 5.56 is 58,000 psi. But those are the pressures you get when the bullet is able to do what it's meant to do. When it can't, you have a very dynamic situation, and predicting the exact pressure is probably very difficult. I believe the manufacturer when they told him how much pressure it would take to shear those threads. The question is how much above 85,000 psi? Very difficult to say, but that chunk of steel that hit his neck did very bullet-like damage.

Proof rounds; my understanding has always been that they are above standard pressure by a non-trivial amount, but certainly not a doubled charge. Lots of cases are/were designed to make doubling impossible because there just isn't enough room for that much powder. I've never seen precise figures, but this web site says 15-30% overcharge. That seems very realistic.

Forgotten Weapons has an excellent video discussing overpressure and the KY Ballistics video. One of his examples happened to me - an old Turkish Mauser and what I think was old, old 8mm Mauser ammo with odd headstamps. Trigger press, bang, bullet strike. Cycle bolt. Trigger press, bang, bullet strike. Cycle bolt. Trigger press, bang, didn't see the bullet strike. Hm, must have hit something that didn't make a puff of dirt/dust. Cycle bolt. Wouldn't go into battery. Thank goodness. Turns out the previous bullet had barely cleared the brass. It kept the next round from chambering. Later at home it wasn't that hard to get out, but I never fired that rifle again.
 
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