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If you are experiencing light strikes with the Spectrum please try the following.

Clean the firing pin channel and striker assembly best you can with something similar to Gun Scrubber. Blow out the firing pin channel and striker assembly with compressed air. Do not oil the striker assembly and firing pin channel. It was not meant to be oiled.

Please report back if you tried this and continue to have light strikes.
 

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After a thorough cleaning, I got a chance to take it to the range today. Still having light strikes. Probably 1rd per mag average. More than I feel comfortable with, that could be the difference between life or death in a DGU situation. Put 150rds through it today. That brings the total up to about 350. This is my first Taurus, and I'm starting to question this purchase unfortunately... the gun was just too damn nice feeling/looking...
 

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So out of my frustration, I decided to take this thing apart again and give it the best cleaning I could do. For those of you who have not fully disassembled the slide, I thought I might share some photos of what it looks like.

First, after taking off the slide cap and removing the striker spring, the striker assembly comes out like so... You have to be very careful not to let the small striker block spring shoot out when sliding this out. This would be the smallest diameter spring you see to the far right. This spring is under tension against the inside upper part of the slide (think pointing up under your rear sights). So when sliding the assembly out, do so slowly with your hand cupped around the back end of the slide. Note: I rotated the assembly clockwise and set it down for the photo. This was actually before reassembling it, when removing it the striker return spring (shown hanging on the firing pin) will probably be seated inside the slide on the pin hole face. When reassembling, it is easier to have the spring (small opening) on the firing pin as shown. The spring you see still in the side is the ejector spring and orientation on that one doesn't matter.
Bumper

Next, I sprayed some CLP onto the back face of the pin hole and scrubbed thoroughly with a nylon brush. Then wiped it clean of any CLP, used q-tips to really get in the area and clean it of any debris and cleaner. Then took my compressor and blew air through this entire area. Afterwards it looked like so:
Auto part

Not shown: I took the pin out of the firing assembly and cleaned the outside and inside (where the spring goes), wiping away any trace amounts of solvent. Be careful not to lose the little pin that goes perpendicular through the firing pin (towards that actual pin end). It comes out easily, but goes back in easily as well.

After reassembling, I checked that the firing pin comes through the pin hole just fine. To do this, I pushed down on the firing block safety and pushed the pin down through firing hole. It should return (by the force of return spring) when let go (do so gently, otherwise the pin can shoot out of the assembly unless you have already replaced striker spring and slide cap). Notice the firing pin length through the hole. I have thoughts on that below....
Hand Bumper Finger

I finished cleaning the gun, lubed only the slide rails (one drop of Hopps #9 lube on end of each slide rail and let it slide down the rail) and one drop on the barrel. Then reassembled the gun. Finally, gave it a nice polish with a silicone cloth.
Gun Firearm Trigger Gun accessory Starting pistol

Alright. So this was the best and most thorough cleaning of the striker channel/assembly that I feel could be done to rectify the light strike issues. Now, for some of my thoughts. First, let me start off by saying I am NOT a mechanical engineer, but I AM an electrical engineer and had to take plenty of mechanical oriented classes and I did minor in physics (mechanics). You can take that with a grain of salt, but I do see some things that could help the light strike problem. For starters, I think that the striker spring is probably strong enough to do the job fine. With that said, I do feel that the firing pin doesn't come through the pin hole as far as some of my other semi-autos (like my Glock 19). That distance is probably impacted in part by the striker return spring. Having a return spring that was just a tad shorter might allow for the firing pin to protrude a tad more, allowing deeper penetration on the primers. If you look at the "ding" on a fired round, you'll see that this firing pin is just barely penetrating the primer surface. Compare that "ding" to the "dent" left behind on a 9mm casing laying around and compare the impact depth. Another thing that could be changed to help this issue would be a firing pin with more mass. A bit more mass would result in more momentum, thus help the impact on the primer = consistent bang. Either one of these two ideas would result in a more reliable firing of the weapon WITHOUT changing the trigger pull weight. A stronger striker spring may fix the issue, but is also going to change the trigger pull, and I happen to think it is HEAVY ENOUGH as is. The pin also doesn't move as freely as I would like inside the striker assembly. Maybe a dry lubricant (graphite powder?) could help it move more freely, thus reducing friction = more momentum.

I literally just finished doing all of this and wanted to share the pictures and my thoughts. I probably won't get another chance to take it to the range until next week, but I am REALLY hoping I can get through a few boxes WITHOUT any light strikes, as it is really starting to frustrate me. A light strike could be the difference between life and death... Anyways, I hope the pictures help anyone who wants to venture deeper into the striker assembly. I will note that there was a lot of debris between the assembly and the back of the pin hole face (where the return spring rests). Again, take all of this however you want, these are just my thoughts and as this is my first Taurus (and thus I am a new member here), I understand if anything I've said holds no water for you...

Edit: after further investigation, the return spring doesn't affect how far the pin protrudes. I took it out completely and put the assembly back in and pushed the pin through... no change in protrusion. So it is the pin its self that needs to be longer... like, .25-.45mm would probably do the trick. I also have now polished the the two parts of the pin that makes contact with the inner channel within the assembly to see if by reducing the friction maybe it will be more reliable. Unfortunately, that was after my last visit to the range (detailed below), so now I DO have to wait and see the effects...
 

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...Again, take all of this however you want, these are just my thoughts and as this is my first Taurus (and thus I am a new member here), I understand if anything I've said holds no water for you...
I only edited for brevity. This shows that you are new here :).

This forum has one of the best collections of humanity that I've run across on the interwebs. Your post was informative and observations were very well thought out. There are no rabid fanboys/girls here. Plenty of us feel that Taurus has gotten a bad rap over the years but that most of their immediate troubles are of their own making (QA and CS in particular).
 

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corey5188
I had the same problem when I changed 1 of my pt111 G2 to a FULL Double Action Only just like yours 1 round per mag , and I increased my striker spring without a change

My fix was to remove the striker block ( a safety for S/A ) PERFECT and using a 2 1/2 striker spring . The block is not needed and does no good in a FULL DAO pistol

On a brand new pistol the timing could be off or just a simple burr of metal on the block or striker that is rubbing against each other to SLOW down the striker just enough to cause a light strike --- remove the striker and block and polish them both with 1000 grit sandpaper and maybe 2000 grit

Put a pencil down into the barrel and pull the trigger and see how far up it shoots and how many times before it barely shoots up ( that's your lite strike )

You could also remove the block and if that takes care of it then send the gun back to Taurus
 

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I couldn't wait until next week, so I grabbed 100rds and ran back to the range before they closed to see if there was any improvement this time. Made it into my third mag before I had a LS. Out of the 2 boxes I had probably 6 or so LSs, which is better than I was doing this morning, but still not where I feel this gun should be. If I was getting 1 per box of 50rds, I'd feel fine carrying this gun daily (as I have been), but I am worried with this rate of failures.

corey5188
I had the same problem when I changed 1 of my pt111 G2 to a FULL Double Action Only just like yours 1 round per mag , and I increased my striker spring without a change

My fix was to remove the striker block ( a safety for S/A ) PERFECT and using a 2 1/2 striker spring . The block is not needed and does no good in a FULL DAO pistol

On a brand new pistol the timing could be off or just a simple burr of metal on the block or striker that is rubbing against each other to SLOW down the striker just enough to cause a light strike --- remove the striker and block and polish them both with 1000 grit sandpaper and maybe 2000 grit

Put a pencil down into the barrel and pull the trigger and see how far up it shoots and how many times before it barely shoots up ( that's your lite strike )

You could also remove the block and if that takes care of it then send the gun back to Taurus
Having read this before I left, between my boxes I took the block out. I've had this thing apart so many times now I was able to get the block out using just my car key and got everything put back together. No change with the block out, still had 2-3 LSs during that box of 50rds...
 

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To each his own!
Personally a carry gun has to meet a 100% fire rate/ function rate or it don't go out of the house with me.
as a matter of fact that many will not care about is my CZ P-01 is now well past 8-9000 rounds with no --0--- failures.
I understand that you are NOT allowed to call a time out during a gun fight.
 

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corey5188...Thank you for your detailed analysis! Hopefully this will get resolved soon. olfarhors is right: needs to be @ 0 failures.
 
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corey5188
As others have said -- 100% on a carry gun or nothing
You are doing much better than before , Taurus does build a tight gun and needs a real good break in time as you have done and the feel of a pistol in the hand of it's user is important so hang in there
I have reread your post and did not see where you changed ammo ??? Have you tried another brand ???
As I have a pocket .380 that just will NOT eject some brands , so it cost me $2.50 more a box and my carry ammo is almost a $1 for each round
 

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On my last range trip prior to sending my Spectrum back to Taurus (after a thorough cleaning and light lube), I ran through 50 rounds of Perfecta, and no issues. Then I ran through 50 rounds of Federal with no issues. Out of a total of 117 rounds that day, it wasn't until the last three rounds (which happened to be Magtech) that I experienced failures, one FTF, and one LS. Although this is better than my previous results by a great deal, I was still not comfortable replacing my KelTec P32 with the Spectrum as my pocket gun. I did not want to be in a position where I didn't have 100% confidence in knowing the gun would do as I asked, if I needed it someday. So, back to Taurus it went.

I will say, that after a bit of internet research, I understand that Federal uses a more "sensitive" primer, and should not be as susceptible to light strikes as other mfrs. Still, looking at the spent casings of all of the ammo I tried (Perfecta, Federal, Magtech and PPU), they all have one thing in common. The "divit" in the primer is NOT what I am accustomed to seeing. It is not as pronounced as it is from any other firearm I own.
 

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So out of my frustration, I decided to take this thing apart again and give it the best cleaning I could do. For those of you who have not fully disassembled the slide, I thought I might share some photos of what it looks like.

First, after taking off the slide cap and removing the striker spring, the striker assembly comes out like so... You have to be very careful not to let the small striker block spring shoot out when sliding this out. This would be the smallest diameter spring you see to the far right. This spring is under tension against the inside upper part of the slide (think pointing up under your rear sights). So when sliding the assembly out, do so slowly with your hand cupped around the back end of the slide. Note: I rotated the assembly clockwise and set it down for the photo. This was actually before reassembling it, when removing it the striker return spring (shown hanging on the firing pin) will probably be seated inside the slide on the pin hole face. When reassembling, it is easier to have the spring (small opening) on the firing pin as shown. The spring you see still in the side is the ejector spring and orientation on that one doesn't matter.
View attachment 382865

Next, I sprayed some CLP onto the back face of the pin hole and scrubbed thoroughly with a nylon brush. Then wiped it clean of any CLP, used q-tips to really get in the area and clean it of any debris and cleaner. Then took my compressor and blew air through this entire area. Afterwards it looked like so:
View attachment 382873

Not shown: I took the pin out of the firing assembly and cleaned the outside and inside (where the spring goes), wiping away any trace amounts of solvent. Be careful not to lose the little pin that goes perpendicular through the firing pin (towards that actual pin end). It comes out easily, but goes back in easily as well.

After reassembling, I checked that the firing pin comes through the pin hole just fine. To do this, I pushed down on the firing block safety and pushed the pin down through firing hole. It should return (by the force of return spring) when let go (do so gently, otherwise the pin can shoot out of the assembly unless you have already replaced striker spring and slide cap). Notice the firing pin length through the hole. I have thoughts on that below....
View attachment 382881

I finished cleaning the gun, lubed only the slide rails (one drop of Hopps #9 lube on end of each slide rail and let it slide down the rail) and one drop on the barrel. Then reassembled the gun. Finally, gave it a nice polish with a silicone cloth.
View attachment 382889

Alright. So this was the best and most thorough cleaning of the striker channel/assembly that I feel could be done to rectify the light strike issues. Now, for some of my thoughts. First, let me start off by saying I am NOT a mechanical engineer, but I AM an electrical engineer and had to take plenty of mechanical oriented classes and I did minor in physics (mechanics). You can take that with a grain of salt, but I do see some things that could help the light strike problem. For starters, I think that the striker spring is probably strong enough to do the job fine. With that said, I do feel that the firing pin doesn't come through the pin hole as far as some of my other semi-autos (like my Glock 19). That distance is probably impacted in part by the striker return spring. Having a return spring that was just a tad shorter might allow for the firing pin to protrude a tad more, allowing deeper penetration on the primers. If you look at the "ding" on a fired round, you'll see that this firing pin is just barely penetrating the primer surface. Compare that "ding" to the "dent" left behind on a 9mm casing laying around and compare the impact depth. Another thing that could be changed to help this issue would be a firing pin with more mass. A bit more mass would result in more momentum, thus help the impact on the primer = consistent bang. Either one of these two ideas would result in a more reliable firing of the weapon WITHOUT changing the trigger pull weight. A stronger striker spring may fix the issue, but is also going to change the trigger pull, and I happen to think it is HEAVY ENOUGH as is. The pin also doesn't move as freely as I would like inside the striker assembly. Maybe a dry lubricant (graphite powder?) could help it move more freely, thus reducing friction = more momentum.

I literally just finished doing all of this and wanted to share the pictures and my thoughts. I probably won't get another chance to take it to the range until next week, but I am REALLY hoping I can get through a few boxes WITHOUT any light strikes, as it is really starting to frustrate me. A light strike could be the difference between life and death... Anyways, I hope the pictures help anyone who wants to venture deeper into the striker assembly. I will note that there was a lot of debris between the assembly and the back of the pin hole face (where the return spring rests). Again, take all of this however you want, these are just my thoughts and as this is my first Taurus (and thus I am a new member here), I understand if anything I've said holds no water for you...

Edit: after further investigation, the return spring doesn't affect how far the pin protrudes. I took it out completely and put the assembly back in and pushed the pin through... no change in protrusion. So it is the pin its self that needs to be longer... like, .25-.45mm would probably do the trick. I also have now polished the the two parts of the pin that makes contact with the inner channel within the assembly to see if by reducing the friction maybe it will be more reliable. Unfortunately, that was after my last visit to the range (detailed below), so now I DO have to wait and see the effects...
Great pics, and really thorough documentation on the disassembly and cleaning of the striker area!
 

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Its generally accepted that Federal has the most sensitive primers, followed by Winchester and Remington, then CCI. course now some of the furren made primers can be quite hard material.
wolffe, PPU, S & B, Tula etc.
IF any question about reliability (in a carry pistol) then I will replace the mainspring with a heavier unit.
Never had that problem with a stock weapon, but I have replaced mainsprings in some pistols to lighten them and got light strikes and so went back up a bit on the spring poundage.
I normally run 700-1000 rounds of various ammo through any gun before I carry it, but thats just my way.
of course all this is of no help as I am fairly sure Taurus will not sale a heavier spring, actually I doubt if they even have various spring weights.
 

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corey5188
As others have said -- 100% on a carry gun or nothing
You are doing much better than before , Taurus does build a tight gun and needs a real good break in time as you have done and the feel of a pistol in the hand of it's user is important so hang in there
I have reread your post and did not see where you changed ammo ??? Have you tried another brand ???
As I have a pocket .380 that just will NOT eject some brands , so it cost me $2.50 more a box and my carry ammo is almost a $1 for each round
I have only shot two brands through this, Herters Select Grade 95g FMJ and Maxxtech 95g FMJ, both being brass cased. As I am getting low on ammo I just ordered 500rds of Perfecta as I mainly shoot that in my 9mm's and it has always been great practice ammo. I carry Sig Sauer Elite Performance V-Jacket HP's (also $1 per round) but I have not shot it, as I would need several mag's worth to actually see if it will LS or not with that ammo.

Great pics, and really thorough documentation on the disassembly and cleaning of the striker area!
Thanks! I figured it might help someone, and there isn't really any documentation or pictures/videos online yet...
 

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I have only shot two brands through this, Herters Select Grade 95g FMJ and Maxxtech 95g FMJ, both being brass cased. As I am getting low on ammo I just ordered 500rds of Perfecta as I mainly shoot that in my 9mm's and it has always been great practice ammo. I carry Sig Sauer Elite Performance V-Jacket HP's (also $1 per round) but I have not shot it, as I would need several mag's worth to actually see if it will LS or not with that ammo.
Perfecta in .380 has a thicker rim than SAAMI specs. I only know this because of my work with Kahr .380s. They sometimes have feeding issues with it because it doesn't want to fit between the extractor and the breech face. There are mods to the extractor to fix it and it appears Kahr has made a change to address the issue as well. I believe Perfecta is a label of Fiocchi and that brand has the same issue in .380.

I haven't tried any in my Spectrum since I got rid of what I had in an LCP II and didn't buy anymore. I look forward to hearing how it runs for you.

I've run Federal Eagle 95 grain and some Blazer 95 grain so far.
 

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To each his own!
Personally a carry gun has to meet a 100% fire rate/ function rate or it don't go out of the house with me.
as a matter of fact that many will not care about is my CZ P-01 is now well past 8-9000 rounds with no --0--- failures.
I understand that you are NOT allowed to call a time out during a gun fight.
That's just mean! :devil:

Maloy
 

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Perfecta in .380 has a thicker rim than SAAMI specs. I only know this because of my work with Kahr .380s. They sometimes have feeding issues with it because it doesn't want to fit between the extractor and the breech face. There are mods to the extractor to fix it and it appears Kahr has made a change to address the issue as well. I believe Perfecta is a label of Fiocchi and that brand has the same issue in .380.

I haven't tried any in my Spectrum since I got rid of what I had in an LCP II and didn't buy anymore. I look forward to hearing how it runs for you.

I've run Federal Eagle 95 grain and some Blazer 95 grain so far.
Thats interesting. You know, the first clip I ran was CCI Brass Blazer, and the whole mag fired fine with out any LS. But I only had one mag worth of rounds, then went straight to Herters and then to Maxxtech. One thing I have noticed of fired casings I am picking up of the Maxxtech, is that the primer seems to have "bubbled" in a way, with the "ding" in the center of the bubble. Just spit firing here, but maybe the casings aren't being held back against the firing pin breach? Maybe then the perfecta, with a thicker rim, might hold back against the breach face more securely? I don't know this is the cause... but its got me wondering now. Check out the image below with the bubble I am talking about. This is a fired Maxxtech round and a new Maxxtech round side by side. None of my unfired ammo show any bubble like this...

Ammunition Button Brass Bullet Metal
 

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That kind of resembles cratering, which is generally a sign of high pressure but that clearly should not be the case here. You're theory sounds plausible at the very least - since straight walled cartridges head space on the mouth of the cartridge...begs the question - what could be causing that behavior?
 

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agreed. those primers are pretty strange looking. The fired one does look overpressured. I'd be curious what the bolt face on the spectrum looks like.
 
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I don't recall ever seeing a primer looking like that.
The only time I've seen it was when working up some pretty hot SD loads and got just a bit too hot (a very good sign to back off, when reloading!)
 
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