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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Why should I care whether a trigger requires 4 or 5 or 6 pounds of pressure to pull? That's why you practice with a weapon. To know it characteristics and idiosyncrasies. If you practice enough it all becomes second nature and you never think about "pounds of trigger pull".

Why should I care if a weapon is DA, SA, DAO, SAO, CBS, BBC, or FOX? That's why you practice. To get to know your weapon. You practice so you never have to give a second thought to things like this.

I believe we sometimes over analyze specs. If the Marine Corps didn't teach it then I don't need to know it IMO.

Or perhaps I'm just too lazy and set in my ways to learn?? ;)
 

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Kinda sounds like you got it figgered out for yourself.
 

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I agree with you as I enjoy shooting my pistols, revolvers and rifles of all actions types and trigger pulls. And it does bug me a bit when other shooters get too concerned about trigger pull. However, I think it does matter for competition handgun shooting and for a duty weapon. Other than that, I think it's an advantage for shooters to have familiarity with various types of action and triggers.
 

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It's potential. Light trigger pull makes it easier to be accurate. It is extremely difficult - impossible for most of us - to completely isolate the muscles in the trigger finger. When a normal person squeezes the trigger, other muscles in the hand contract, moving the point of aim. So there are three factors that are at work here, purpose of shooting, ability, and personal preference.
If you don't wish to worry about it - fine. Enjoy your shooting. But before you think you know what your are talking about, try a competition gun with a really well tuned trigger. It may very well open your eyes.
OTOH, most duty guns have minimum trigger weights rather than maximums - that's about liability. And before you criticize anyone concerned about them, attend a court session about a shooting in which a question about intent arises.

Bullseye shooting, self defense, and combat all have different requirements and the ideal trigger for each would be different. Can one gun/one trigger be used in all situations. Sure, but it won't be the best possible solution.
 

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It's funny, I have had people question me about my Beretta PX4, while using it in IDPA, about how do I deal with the first DA trigger pull being longer and heavier than the subsequent SA trigger pull. For me it's simply a non-issue. Often times that first DA pull is a better shot than some of the SA pulls. I really don't even think about it or notice it.
I guess at some point a person wouldn't want too heavy of a trigger pull but I do think people get too hung up on the "numbers" sometimes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I agree with you as I enjoy shooting my pistols, revolvers and rifles of all actions types and trigger pulls. And it does bug me a bit when other shooters get too concerned about trigger pull. However, I think it does matter for competition handgun shooting and for a duty weapon. Other than that, I think it's an advantage for shooters to have familiarity with various types of action and triggers.
You could very well be right about this.
 

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For me, I prefer a very light trigger. My accuracy is much better with a light trigger. The harder i have to pull, the more likely I am to shoot right. I shoot a lot of different guns, and I try to set a light trigger on all of them just for consistancy so that I shoot all weapons well. For me, it is hard to go from a 2.5 lb trigger on my Win Model 70 to a 6.5 lb trigger on a stock 10/22. I have went to shoot friends guns before, and pull the trigger..stop and make sure the saftey wasn't on because it never went off, then just realized it has a very heavy trigger. It all comes down to what you like.
 

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It's funny, I have had people question me about my Beretta PX4, while using it in IDPA, about how do I deal with the first DA trigger pull being longer and heavier than the subsequent SA trigger pull. For me it's simply a non-issue. Often times that first DA pull is a better shot than some of the SA pulls. I really don't even think about it or notice it.
I guess at some point a person wouldn't want too heavy of a trigger pull but I do think people get too hung up on the "numbers" sometimes.
I've been seriously considering getting a PX4 compact or full size in 40 S&W or 45 auto. Which do you have and any words of wisdom about them? Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It's potential. Light trigger pull makes it easier to be accurate. It is extremely difficult - impossible for most of us - to completely isolate the muscles in the trigger finger. When a normal person squeezes the trigger, other muscles in the hand contract, moving the point of aim. So there are three factors that are at work here, purpose of shooting, ability, and personal preference.
If you don't wish to worry about it - fine. Enjoy your shooting. But before you think you know what your are talking about, try a competition gun with a really well tuned trigger. It may very well open your eyes.
OTOH, most duty guns have minimum trigger weights rather than maximums - that's about liability. And before you criticize anyone concerned about them, attend a court session about a shooting in which a question about intent arises.

Bullseye shooting, self defense, and combat all have different requirements and the ideal trigger for each would be different. Can one gun/one trigger be used in all situations. Sure, but it won't be the best possible solution.
First of all I don't believe I criticized anyone. I was making a personal observation about my thoughts and feelings on the subject. If someone thinks it's important to know all the numbers then I say good for them.

With all due respect I don't care about competition shooters. That's not real life and has nothing to do with personal defense. I'm talking about protecting my life and the lives of my family.

Can I hit what I aim at? Yes. Do I care about pounds of trigger pull? No. That's why you practice with your weapon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
For me, I prefer a very light trigger. My accuracy is much better with a light trigger. The harder i have to pull, the more likely I am to shoot right. I shoot a lot of different guns, and I try to set a light trigger on all of them just for consistancy so that I shoot all weapons well. For me, it is hard to go from a 2.5 lb trigger on my Win Model 70 to a 6.5 lb trigger on a stock 10/22. I have went to shoot friends guns before, and pull the trigger..stop and make sure the saftey wasn't on because it never went off, then just realized it has a very heavy trigger. It all comes down to what you like.
I can't disagree with anything you wrote. That's why you practice with each individual weapon over and over.

So there won't be any surprises when you pull that trigger. But of course if you're firing a weapon for the first time (such as your friend's gun) you can't know exactly what will happen.

There are no right or wrong answers to all this. :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
It's funny, I have had people question me about my Beretta PX4, while using it in IDPA, about how do I deal with the first DA trigger pull being longer and heavier than the subsequent SA trigger pull. For me it's simply a non-issue. Often times that first DA pull is a better shot than some of the SA pulls. I really don't even think about it or notice it.
I guess at some point a person wouldn't want too heavy of a trigger pull but I do think people get too hung up on the "numbers" sometimes.
That's true.
 

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I dont care about the poundage. As long as its not a safety trigger. I absolutely cant stand those.
 

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First of all I don't believe I criticized anyone. I was making a personal observation about my thoughts and feelings on the subject. If someone thinks it's important to know all the numbers then I say good for them.

With all due respect I don't care about competition shooters. That's not real life and has nothing to do with personal defense. I'm talking about protecting my life and the lives of my family.

Can I hit what I aim at? Yes. Do I care about pounds of trigger pull? No. That's why you practice with your weapon.
See, now you've defined your use and thereby changed the argument.
SD triggers are a subset of all triggers and you will find that pretty much everybody designs in a pretty narrow range of trigger pull for SD guns. Most - at least outside of NY - have roughly a 5 lb. pull.
Now, specifically in this situation, 5 lb. is a pretty good trigger weight.
Research shows that the NY 12 lb. trigger drops the hit ratio of officers firing under stress from 51% (with 5 lb trigger) to 12% which is why most jurisdictions are going away from the NY trigger.
So even here, trigger pull matters.
 
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It's potential. Light trigger pull makes it easier to be accurate. It is extremely difficult - impossible for most of us - to completely isolate the muscles in the trigger finger. When a normal person squeezes the trigger, other muscles in the hand contract, moving the point of aim. So there are three factors that are at work here, purpose of shooting, ability, and personal preference.
If you don't wish to worry about it - fine. Enjoy your shooting. But before you think you know what your are talking about, try a competition gun with a really well tuned trigger. It may very well open your eyes.
OTOH, most duty guns have minimum trigger weights rather than maximums - that's about liability. And before you criticize anyone concerned about them, attend a court session about a shooting in which a question about intent arises.

Bullseye shooting, self defense, and combat all have different requirements and the ideal trigger for each would be different. Can one gun/one trigger be used in all situations. Sure, but it won't be the best possible solution.
I agree completely with your conclusions. My High Standard Bulls Eye pistol is so light it is almost scary! I refuse to let anybody else shoot it unless I trust their experience with guns 100% and I warn them about the light trigger, it shoots like a dream for Bulls Eye matches and that is it's only use. were I to use it for carry or field shooting I would absolutely adjust the trigger for a heavier pull.

I did let one of the local LEO's shoot it one time and after the first shot his eyes were as big as saucers and all he could say was "that's a mighty light trigger"!
 

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What trigger pull means for me. Pocket pistols and other small ccw need a little more trigger pull for safety sake. Target or competiton shoots want lighter or smoother pulls for accuracy. my wifes sig 938 is a good example 8.5 lb trigger pull hard for me to shoot I am used to my 1911 smooth trigger 4.5 lb pull. I squeeze and pull the short barrel down on my shot when I shoot her 938. This is due to having to get by the heavy trigger pull.With 1911 I shoot idpa and carry for my ccw. It is very accurate on fast second shots due to lighter more smoother pull. I do consider Idpa not as a contest perspective but is important due to learning how to react in certain situtations and under pressure in a real life scenario. So so competition shooting improves your selfdefense capabilitys.

jhp
what matters and to level of technical expertise is just a personal preference
 

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First of all I don't believe I criticized anyone. I was making a personal observation about my thoughts and feelings on the subject. If someone thinks it's important to know all the numbers then I say good for them.

With all due respect I don't care about competition shooters. That's not real life and has nothing to do with personal defense. I'm talking about protecting my life and the lives of my family.

Can I hit what I aim at? Yes. Do I care about pounds of trigger pull? No. That's why you practice with your weapon.
I agree with you to a point, if you have ever fired an 1895 Nagant revolver in DA you might think a bit differently. I have no problem between 2-12# but on either side of that accuracy can suffer for me regardless of the amount of familiarity with the weapon.
 

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This is why I choose a DAO pistol so trigger pull is closer to the revolvers I have grown used to. Going from one to the other requires less "thinking" and keeps me on target better. JM2¢
 

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It's potential. Light trigger pull makes it easier to be accurate. It is extremely difficult - impossible for most of us - to completely isolate the muscles in the trigger finger. When a normal person squeezes the trigger, other muscles in the hand contract, moving the point of aim. So there are three factors that are at work here, purpose of shooting, ability, and personal preference.
If you don't wish to worry about it - fine. Enjoy your shooting. But before you think you know what your are talking about, try a competition gun with a really well tuned trigger. It may very well open your eyes.
OTOH, most duty guns have minimum trigger weights rather than maximums - that's about liability. And before you criticize anyone concerned about them, attend a court session about a shooting in which a question about intent arises.

Bullseye shooting, self defense, and combat all have different requirements and the ideal trigger for each would be different. Can one gun/one trigger be used in all situations. Sure, but it won't be the best possible solution.
Mad Kaw sums it up pretty good. I personally do not like light triggers on my hunting rifles, I think they're dangerous but its just my personal opinion. When I got into Bullseye shooting, I learned and am still learning about what a smooth and light trigger can do for my scores. What shooters need to understand is that when it comes to rifles and pistols, one needs to focus on PRESSING the trigger straight back. Shotgun shooting requires more of a "slap" when swinging through a moving target.
 
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