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Discussion Starter #1
was looking into adding another single stage press to my bench as a dedicated sizing press for cases the one I do have is a Lee reloader that is not very rugged at all but has gotten the job done so far. Was thinking of adding a lee classic cast but kept seeing a bunch of rcbs jr 2 presses and they look beefy. Has anyone used these two presses and can put there 2 cents into what is the better choice?

I reload pistol and so far just 223/556 for rifle
 

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RCBS Rock Chucker is what I went with when I got a single stage.

You can use it for anything from .25ACP to .50BMG- including brass shotgun shells if you remove the insert so the larger dies can fit- and nobody's ever doubted their toughness.
 

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I have the Lee classic cast. It's a hoss. But any o style press will serve you just fine and even the older cast c style ones will be fine.

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If I wanted to add a single stage operation to my bench, I would still buy another Lee Turret press. No problem operating it as a single stage by removing the indexing rod (mines been out for many years anyway) and loading all cartridges up to and including 45-70. Bottlenecked cases like .308, 30-30 etc work fine also. Primer attachments are readily available along with powder handling equipment. Working single stage resizing cases and want to charge and/or seat bullets? Simply flip the turret to the next die.

I have thought of adding a dedicated single stage for decapping or re-sizing if I found one under 40 bucks, but then decide that I don't really need it.
 

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If I wanted to add a single stage operation to my bench, I would still buy another Lee Turret press. No problem operating it as a single stage by removing the indexing rod (mines been out for many years anyway) and loading all cartridges up to and including 45-70. Bottlenecked cases like .308, 30-30 etc work fine also. Primer attachments are readily available along with powder handling equipment. Working single stage resizing cases and want to charge and/or seat bullets? Simply flip the turret to the next die.

I have thought of adding a dedicated single stage for decapping or re-sizing if I found one under 40 bucks, but then decide that I don't really need it.
Good point, my turret is a work horse and I use it more than anything else.

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Discussion Starter #6
If I wanted to add a single stage operation to my bench, I would still buy another Lee Turret press. No problem operating it as a single stage by removing the indexing rod (mines been out for many years anyway) and loading all cartridges up to and including 45-70. Bottlenecked cases like .308, 30-30 etc work fine also. Primer attachments are readily available along with powder handling equipment. Working single stage resizing cases and want to charge and/or seat bullets? Simply flip the turret to the next die.

I have thought of adding a dedicated single stage for decapping or re-sizing if I found one under 40 bucks, but then decide that I don't really need it.
Good point , that is how I use my turret with the rod removed by your recommendation when I got it and love it so far. I have the value turret so I dont know if that changes anything lol

20210307_205454.jpg
 

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I think kmw1954 bought the Value Turret also, I've no experience with them. I have the "Deluxe" with the cast aluminum base and if I were shopping I would try for the Cast Turret base model if they still make them.

The way you've got yours bolted down...it's going NOWHERE!!
 

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I have several single stage presses. I acquired them used.

I have one (Pacific by Hornady) dedicated to decapping only, I decap as I sort, prior to tumbling. This keeps the dirt out of my “clean” presses. Having worked as a mechanic, I know what dirt can do to steel.

One (RCBS R C) is dedicated to bulge busting, done after cleaning, before sizing, because some of you shoot unsupported chambers.
🥴

One (C H) is dedicated to swedging crimped primer pockets.

One (Lyman) sits empty ready for what ever comes along, sizing rifle brass mostly.

All of them have plates on them for the Lee Bench Plate system, four screws and I’ve changed presses.

I size and prime, at my leisure, prior to the manufacturing process.

For manufacturing purposes I have, Lee 3 hole indexing turret, Lee 4 hole indexing turret, and a Lee Pro 1000, depending on the job at hand.

The 4 hole was my first and I used it without the index until I got comfortable. It and the progressive were the only two I bought new.

All are kept in sealed 6 gallon buckets until called upon.

As to the question at hand. I believe you are on the right track. If you think you may be working with large rifle brass, I think a good heavy single stage is the way to go.

Whether you like Ford’s or Ram’s, is up to you.
🤭
 

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agree with previous post.
I had a turret press years ago (lyman) and when i got into the 30 & 35 Herritt for the Thompson Contender I bought a rock crusher to reform brass, I soon found out that the turret press would do the job about as easily as the Rock.
might any press that you buy will work fine.
 
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I like and have the Lee Classic cast. Great price and solid. I have the little RCBS from years back that I usually deprime with or put it in as last step crimping.
 

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477626


As a reply to the RCBS JR press, here is a JR3 with both a 30-06 and a 223 shell case standing inside it with no shell holder in place. So if wanting to use one for resizing large bottleneck cases I would look to the Lee as it has more clearance and also has compound leverage in the linkage.

I use this press with a Universal de-capping die and to prep 223 brass. Resize 223 and Lee Quick trim along with an RCBS collet bullet puller.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
View attachment 477626

As a reply to the RCBS JR press, here is a JR3 with both a 30-06 and a 223 shell case standing inside it with no shell holder in place. So if wanting to use one for resizing large bottleneck cases I would look to the Lee as it has more clearance and also has compound leverage in the linkage.

I use this press with a Universal de-capping die and to prep 223 brass. Resize 223 and Lee Quick trim along with an RCBS collet bullet puller.
definetly looks beefy thats for sure might get one just for its beefyness lol , if I can find a good deal on the lee I will think about it but right now they are through the roof unfortunately after looking through everything they seem to be going for 200+ at the moment :(
 

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definetly looks beefy thats for sure might get one just for its beefyness lol , if I can find a good deal on the lee I will think about it but right now they are through the roof unfortunately after looking through everything they seem to be going for 200+ at the moment :(
Even before the latest drought, used presses were commanding a price very near the cost of new ones. The scarcity of components may impact the supply/demand situation for that gear soon.
 
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good news is--that as soon as the current thought process of Going Green- gets into full swing and we all move toward Ray Guns instead of that dirty smokeless powder the price for all these things will reduce considerbally!
113187d1426971786-your-next-gun-may-not-need-bullets-laser-gun.gif
 
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I don't even have a press, but I'm thinking about buying it. But I came across information somewhere that now prices have risen due to a shortage of production due to a pandemic. I look at different models of presses and love the $ 650 Lee press. Although, this article Getting the Best Progressive Reloading Press That Save You a Lot of Money is purely for informational purposes and just examples are given, maybe there are better press models? I want to estimate how much money I generally need to organize the process and whether it will pay off in the current situation.
 

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I don't even have a press, but I'm thinking about buying it. But I came across information somewhere that now prices have risen due to a shortage of production due to a pandemic. I look at different models of presses and love the $ 650 Lee press. Although, this article Getting the Best Progressive Reloading Press That Save You a Lot of Money is purely for informational purposes and just examples are given, maybe there are better press models? I want to estimate how much money I generally need to organize the process and whether it will pay off in the current situation.

It all depends what you plan to load? Also if you can find components. I have been able to find lee classic cast press for around 150$ and the challenger breech lock cast aluminum for $89 which is good in todays prices.

If your looking at turret presses the lee value turret at 135$ or the lee classic turret at 189$ are good deals which is the happy middle ground

For progressives I would personally go with the lee auto breech lock for the price and all my lee parts transfer over. I have found them for around 120-180

The press is the beggining and then everything else snowballs. Depending on how in depth you want to be with case prep. When I first started I started with a hand press, lee scoops, a set of lee dies and 1lb of trail boss powder for 150$ and I made 1000+ rounds with it and it paid for itself now its a little more expensive but will pay off
 

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I don't even have a press, but I'm thinking about buying it. But I came across information somewhere that now prices have risen due to a shortage of production due to a pandemic. I look at different models of presses and love the $ 650 Lee press. Although, this article Getting the Best Progressive Reloading Press That Save You a Lot of Money is purely for informational purposes and just examples are given, maybe there are better press models? I want to estimate how much money I generally need to organize the process and whether it will pay off in the current situation.
While I have a progressive press, I use my turret presses much more than I use the progressive. I always recommend a turret as a first purchase, due to the ability to remove the index rod and use it as a single stage.

All my single stages are set for specific operations that don’t lend themselves to the ‘normal’ reloading progression.
 

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I don't even have a press, but I'm thinking about buying it. But I came across information somewhere that now prices have risen due to a shortage of production due to a pandemic.

I want to estimate how much money I generally need to organize the process and whether it will pay off in the current situation.
There are as many reasons for reloading ammunition as there are reloading tools. Some very good reasons and some fit "just because". I have never tried to discourage anyone from starting to reload yet still try to explain the advantages and disadvantages of doing it so they can decide for themselves. I do know a few people though that should never be allowed anywhere near a reloading bench.

That is a very correct statement about buying into reloading at this present time. Seems as though all manufacturing has been shut down and all sock piles have been exhausted, so supply and demand is in full force. I won't even try to speculate what it would cost in today's money. But I can tell you back just a couple years ago I purchased a used Lee Pro1000 press with dies and a powder measure, a scale and a new release reloading manual for about $160.00.. I already owned a dial caliper and an old manual from my first session of reloading. With that I was able to start reloading for my pistol. I have since added many more tools and accessories to expand my hobby. But again for about$160.00 I was able to get started and make usable ammunition.

I do foresee those days and pricing returning in the future. It is just the nature of the hobby. Some of the newbs will get tired or bored and sell off or use older folks will give it up because we just can't do it anymore.
 
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