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Hi, everyone, new RoughRider owner and new member. I have cruised this site several times, mostly because i am a Rossi owner, and now a RoughRider owner. As a brief background, i am 66 years old, have owned quite a few guns in my lifetime, but just a few now, "life" happens, finances always interesting! Anyway, i have owned a Ruger Superblackhawk and Single Six, both stainless. So, i can appreciate "nice" guns. I no longer own those two, unfortunately, and now that i am semi-retired and on fixed income, will not be able to replace them. However, i am ok with that! I learned long ago to appreciate each firearm for what it was, not what someone else thought it ought to be. And that was when i still had more expensive guns. Basically, i don't have much patience with "gun snobs", i find them to be less than open-minded and very impractical. Every gun is a tool, different tools for different jobs, appreciate them for what they are! Some of you will understand this statement, some may not, but it is the truth: i enjoy owning my less expensive guns just as much as i enjoyed owning my more expensive guns! Ok, with that out of the way, i have a question about the simulated case hardening, for example on the "Johnny Boy" model. My new RoughRider frame is the basic black (painted), it should be easy to touch-up small scrapes and such. Not sure about the simulated case-hardening. Do any of you know how (relatively) durable it is, and also how one would be able to touch-up that finish. Thanks in advance for any of your comments, you all seem to be very good fellas on this forum, thanks for allowing me to be a part of it! Also, i hope that together, we can all maybe make this site a little more active, i will definitely contribute anything in the future that i may have to offer!
 

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Wish I could help, but mine is black as well. I know my Ruger Vaquero has a simulated case hardened finish, it has a couple spots where it is damaged and I wish it was just blued. I can't imagine Heritage having a better finish than Ruger.
 

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Welcome aboard, from Las Vegas!
I have a Rough Rider too, but I don't know the answer to your "Case-hardened" question.
I do know that my Rough Rider doesn't like the cheap bulk-load ammo. It'll fire it, but the accuracy is terrible!
When I shoot high velocity ammo, the accuracy improves dramatically.
 

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I don’t own a Rough Rider but, doesn’t it have an aluminum frame? If so, It will be difficult or impossible to apply any sort of artificial or real case hardened finish.
 

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I don’t own a Rough Rider but, doesn’t it have an aluminum frame? If so, It will be difficult or impossible to apply any sort of artificial or real case hardened finish.
What I have seen about the Rough Rider is that the frame is made of an alloy not acceptable to the state of IL and therefore cannot be sold to anyone living in IL.

*This model does not meet requirements for melting point laws.* I read somewhere this was specific to IL.


The case hardened does not have the same warning about melting point as the other black framed revolvers.
 

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The fake case hardening is a chemical treatment. I don't know exactly what the process is or what they use.

There was only 3 or 4 places still doing real bone meal case hardening last time I looked around and all of them want about what you have in that Rough Rider to do a gun.
 
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To the OP...welcome to the forum from Northern Illinois! I like your comparison to firearms as tools. I have good tools that are worth more and some less, but they do all fill the function for which they were purchased.

What I have seen about the Rough Rider is that the frame is made of an alloy not acceptable to the state of IL and therefore cannot be sold to anyone living in IL.

*This model does not meet requirements for melting point laws.* I read somewhere this was specific to IL.


The case hardened does not have the same warning about melting point as the other black framed revolvers.
I finally was able to buy a Rough Rider and have it shipped to my FFl in ILLinois. They do make and sell a steel framed model which cost around 180.00...compared to the 125-135 that dual cylinder models usually sell for if the alloy framed versions.

I might be interested in the faux case hardening finish. Sounds like maybe a ceracote?

Edit...The Ruger Wrangler is prohibited for sale in ILLinois as far as I know.
 
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So I take it that the regular Rough Riders that have been around for decades will last as long as the case hardened ones will, but the case harden ones are made to satisfy the Commie states with the melting point laws?
 

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So I take it that the regular Rough Riders that have been around for decades will last as long as the case hardened ones will, but the case harden ones are made to satisfy the Commie states with the melting point laws?
Just to confuse you farther, the Colt New Frontier .22 has an aluminum frame and a chemical case hardening finish.

The melting point laws were aimed at the cheap Zymak guns. Finish has nothing to do with it.
 
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Just to confuse you farther, the Colt New Frontier .22 has an aluminum frame and a chemical case hardening finish.

The melting point laws were aimed at the cheap Zymak guns. Finish has nothing to do with it.
Wait....is there a true "case hardened" firearm and a "case hardened" finished look firearm or they are both the same thing?.....Yes, nice job in confusing me....:confused:
 

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Yes.:D

There's a color case hardening that involves heat and a treatment of the metal. Doug Turnbull is famous for it.

Then, there's a chemical finish meant to duplicate the result.
 

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I have had the case hardened model since 2013 and it still looks new. I recommend it.
 

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So I take it that the regular Rough Riders that have been around for decades will last as long as the case hardened ones will, but the case harden ones are made to satisfy the Commie states with the melting point laws?
Their simulated case hardening shouldn't make the slightest difference in how long the gun lasts. What matters to the commie states is the type of metal, not the finish. As previously noted, there are Rough Rider 22s with steel frames, and those should be legal in states with idiotic melting point laws.

Wait....is there a true "case hardened" firearm and a "case hardened" finished look firearm or they are both the same thing?.....Yes, nice job in confusing me....:confused:
I don't believe Rough Rider makes a .22 with a real case hardened frame. The make a Zamak alloy frame that's black, they make a Zamak alloy frame that's simulated case hardened, and they make steel frames that are black. Getting back to your original question, I would expect the simulated case hardening to be pretty durable, but I have no idea how you'd touch it up.
 

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Their simulated case hardening shouldn't make the slightest difference in how long the gun lasts. What matters to the commie states is the type of metal, not the finish. As previously noted, there are Rough Rider 22s with steel frames, and those should be legal in states with idiotic melting point laws.



I don't believe Rough Rider makes a .22 with a real case hardened frame. The make a Zamak alloy frame that's black, they make a Zamak alloy frame that's simulated case hardened, and they make steel frames that are black. Getting back to your original question, I would expect the simulated case hardening to be pretty durable, but I have no idea how you'd touch it up.
I bought a Rough Rider with a steel frame and had it shipped to my FFL in ILLinois. I had to pay about 70.00 more for that model just to have one in this awful state. The poly framed pistols get around the law by having the serial number etched on the steel inner frame. The law initially was concerned about the ease of obliterating the serial number. This is also the reason why they have their shorts in a bunch about ghost guns.
 

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Case hardening and case coloring are different processes. One hardens the surface of metal, causing color changes in the process, the other simply simulates the color changes without changing the structure of the metal, i.e., it's merely cosmetic.

(I know it's been said before but I thought it needed repeating.;))
 
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