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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
:mad: Two to three people were getting individual attention out of a class of 12, we all payed the same amount of money, one instructors time was completely taken up by a single individual, which held up the entire class, so the back up instructor ended up picking up the main instructors slack, they were both nice, and knowledgeable...but its simply not fair that we were not all afforded individual attention that only 2-3 people were given. I ended up not being able to shoot off all 150 of my rounds, not even a hundred, I only got to shoot 80 out of the 100 rounds everybody else got to shoot.

They were shooting 9mm Glocks/SigSauer rentals, I was the only one shooting with a 357 Magnum, brand scoffed at, pitting on the sights scoffed at, and I was hitting targets better than most save for the military/competition shooter that went there with his wife. They incorrectly remarked that I was shooting a 38spcl, how could they not hear the difference??? I only have a few hours of range time, not experienced much at all, but they were shooting their 9mm like they were shooting S&W 500 Mags.

Revolvers apparently were a big joke, I was the only one that had them, a larger caliber, shooting less than they did but more accurately. How can an experienced shooter mistake a 357 for a 38spcl? Yes, your guns are so much better, buy an expensive gun you that you cant even shoot:mad:

Addition: I even showed my revolver to an employee that didn't know I bought it from them( wont say the name out of respect for them even tho they have shown none to me) at the last gunshow, and he said it was in bad condition. 300 dollars new, bought for 200 dollars, needs well over that in repairs. Most of the info save for trigger pull/stance/grip was useless for me since it was based on automatics/semi autos, they didn't even mention revolver related stuff until I mentioned it.
 

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Sounds like they need to establish a rule of 3 students per instructor and any student who is having difficulty with the course that requires continuous individual training should be required to get individual training on another day so as not to ruin everyone's experience.

There is no place for gun snobbery in the training business.
 

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Between teaching FDLE Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission Firearms Instructor courses, active LEO's, Academies and CCW classes, I push quite a few hundred students through weapons qualifications annually.

Some classes are good, and some are not, with way too much time being spent on "rocks" that should be tactfully recycled into another follow up course (my policy).

When teaching/certifying new firearms instructors I constantly run across young candidates that have never seen let alone handled a revolver. So it's a great "from the basic square 1" learning curve for them too. Many learn "just enough" about revolvers to pass the course, with the hopes they never have to teach it.

I'd hazard a guess that maybe the instructors in your case weren't snubbing you and your choice of firearms as much as showing their total "lack of knowledge" of how to instruct it's use.
 

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I'd mention it to the owner and keep that in mind next time you feel like spending money there.
 

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Cheer up and walk in the sunlight. Most classrooms and learning situations are driven by pulling up the bottom folks. And there is no way to tell a .38 special from a .357 visually; all .357s can shoot .38 spec bullets. I have owned 357s and seldom shot 357 mag as they cost too much to practice with; shot 158 gr .38 spec. In Texas, if you qualify with a wheel gun, you are ONLY allowed to carry a revolver; most folks qualify with a semi-auto for that reason (gives them later flexibility as to what they carry). Anyway, Easter shouldn't be about feeling miserable about something that won't seem very important a few days from now. As I said, cheer up and walk in the sunshine.
 

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Maybe you could take some satisfaction in knowing you're not one of the "ignorant sheepies", even though you don't have a large amount of experience. That still doesn't give you your money's worth for the course. Have you ever noticed that competent people often pay the price of other peoples incompetence? That's what the Good Lord did.
 

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Look on the bright side, it wasn't you that had to have special treatment, the other folks must have needed it. It's one of those deals like if the boss isn't hounding you, you must be doing ok.

...AND...google is great for leaving feedback for buisness'. *wink wink*
 

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I would tend to be a bit "ticked". But, did you pass the class? Maybe the instructor realised this. Many instructors are graded on the number of passes they get.
I am an instructor of both adults and children. My students do not pay, but in the interests of the "greater good" you have to let some people go down to get the majority through. The way I was taught to teach, is that in say a one day course, you spend the first hour, or 10%, while going over the basics, introductions etc, gauging the knowledge and learning ability of your students, whether you should ask them questions based on the longevity and relevance of their answers in that first 10%. Some you can use to teach others, some you know you will have to give one on one to, some you know from the get go are unprepared, unteachable in the time you have, and should be virtually ignored, and some should not be there in the first place.
That having been decided, you have to remain flexible because there are always some surprises. In EVERY class, and I do not care if it is a Bible class, a class on food prep or how to diaper a baby....there is ALWAYS a surprise!
It would be nice for every student in every class to pass, but I would rather remain honest to myself in the classes I teach and let the true failures fail. If there is a borderline case...I try and work on them during the breaks. To me a teacher that does not fail the failures is not a teacher and a fraud to boot!
 
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Did you ask for a refund? Yes,No? They don't know they're doing a bad job, if no one says anything. Sure you can make an internet complaint, but face it, that's less than nothing. Get in their face, scream and holler, demand a free "something" for their ineptitude. Just remember, for every internet complaint, there are a hundred "attaboys". As with everything in life, if YOU don't take action when wronged, who gives a crap?
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
I sent them an email, might call them if I don't get a response. I didin't want to be the "disgruntled/angry customer with a gun and ammo in a black bag", I'm always very aware of myself, even hyper aware when around firearms. I'm not at all mad, maybe a little yesterday...but it is Easter. I did get some things out of it, I did pass the course. I mentioned gas escaping the revolver cylinder, how that effects grip vs the semi auto grip they were grinding into us. Most of what they went over seemed to be common sense issues. I even asked if I could skip the Fundamentals class and go straight to defensive pistol 1, they said no. I might just get private training and say screw the certificate I get. Thank you everyone, have a good day
 

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Everyone with autochuckers fired 100 rounds and you (the OP) only got to fire 80?
Was there a fixed time frame for the class?
Those with autoloaders can usually load and fire much faster than someone with a revolver - especially if they have multiple and/or hi-cap magazines.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Yeah, even if I had speed loaders I wouldn't have been able to keep up with as much as they shot/speed of instructor calling drills. There was fixed time, we started late because of late arrived student, and started our drills late because of the same student plus others. I just don't like ill prepared people, lol I'm going to try to get at least a few free range passes once I make contact with them
 

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So what's your complaint? Were you more experienced than those who got more attention? Are they now better qualified to have a CCL now that they've had that personal attention? Did you need the personal attention or are you just mad because you didn't get what you thought you deserved or paid for? Life isn't fair. I'd rather the inexperienced receive the majority of the teaching than someone who is already experienced and knows how to handle a gun. So, to answer your question, NO.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
In a place of public business, when your not in someones private home, every customer gets treated the same, regardless. I my gripes were mostly on how they handled things, glanced over what I thought were important details even in a beginning course. They weren't there for most of my questions, and they didn't pay for personal attention, they have separate prices/courses for that, that cost more. Regardless if it was nice of them for doing so, everyone should get treated the same.
 

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Here's the thing about firearms training - you don't get good from a single training session. You get good from learning the information and practicing the techniques they impart during training. As long as they provided you with suitable instruction, and provided you with materials you can study on your own I wouldn't be too miffed about it. There's an old saying - "The best revenge is living well." In this case I'd say the best revenge is shooting well. Take the info you learned, practice it until it becomes part of you, and your skills will improve. And isn't that what you took the training for to begin with? Now if you felt like you didn't get the training you paid for, and they didn't leave you with a clear training path to follow later, then I think I might be a little miffed too. All comes down to what you took away from the training, and was it worth what you paid for it.
 

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I can't believe that anyone teaching a class about the use of firearms, much less a concealed carry
class would knock revolvers! They are more dependable than most semiautos and it takes more
skill and shooting knowldege to shoot one accurately than a semiauto, especially in the magnum
calibers. The snubnose revolver is still probably the most carried type of gun in circulation and
will be carried by many gunowners for years to come, including this one. It is sad that gun snobs
ruined what should have been a pleasant experience for you. They should have remembered that
the important thing a CCW class should teach is how to safely handle and accurately shoot the
firearm the gunowner will be using and the laws about its useage, not what model the instructor
is a fanboy of and what ammuniton he uses.
 

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The OP doesn't bother listing which state he is from but I enjoy hearing what other states do. Keep in mind all states set up CHL class criteria much differently... In Texas, a vet doesn't shoot. If he qualified in the military and shows his DD214, he doesn't shoot and gets a discount. During the firing section, our folks didn't shoot anywhere near 100 rds. As I recall, they first lined up four class members; each with a range officer with a carpenters nail belt containing that persons ammo. Ammo was dispensed ONLY as needed. First round of shooting was at about 7 ft. if memory serves. I served as a range officer as did all the other vets. You handed the shooter 3 rds and he/she loaded them and fired ONLY on command of the instructor. The range officer was there to ensure strict safety compliance. Seems to me that the students shot the majority of their rounds at 7 ft and 15 ft (or something like that) and and then shot about 5 rounds at 21 ft? Anyway, 80 percent of the shots were on top the target. My instructor was and has been JM Clements, owner of Bandera Gun Club and retired AF vet. He looks and sounds like Gunny Ermy. He does present a lot of personal opinion during the classroom that I personally have some reservation about but the basic facts and rules were covered and tested. The class shooting was to make sure you wouldn't shoot yourself or someone else accidently and in no way represented substantial defense carry training... just some single shot, non-moving target stuff to ensure basic firearm technique with just a bit of accuracy thrown in. I personally could have passed the firearm shooting part shooting left handed (I am a righty) as it is so easy BUT need classroom training each time, incuding refreshers as the laws change and I forget stuff. Perhaps a separate thread on state CHL class practices would be fun. And as far as each student being treated the same... bwhahahahha when I went to high school the teachers NEVER treated me like ANYONE else. I got ALLLLLL the special attention an idiot and troublemaker deserved.
 

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As with many things, Pareto's principle operates. I see MissKitty's point that if you're not getting extra attention, you're doing something right. Even so, there should be a certain amount of attention given to each individual to diagnose his problems, etc. to meet the training objectives, despite having to take care of the stragglers.

I've played this role in a few different settings, and I would usually segregate the stragglers for more attention by my assistant instructors, while I take care of the main group. Even to the point of splitting one class into two classes, if necessary.
 

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When I took my Basic N.R.A. Gun Safety class, it was scheduled for 5 people. I was the only one who showed. I had already done lots of prior reading, so the class was a breeze for both of us. I bet that was the easiest class he ever taught.
 
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