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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Actually one of my 2 G3s.
It shot nicely but I finally figured out the movement in my rear sight was not due to being bumped in the box. but simply moving on its own from firing.
To the right throwing off my aim.

So I took it out today,.. by hammering with a punch the glock style bladed rear sight ( which I never liked anyway) with the goal to lock tite and remount in the middle.

But now it wont go back on unless I use an amount of force I am not comfortable with to use on a handgun.

I quickly cleaned off the drying locktite when I realzied this ( with isopropyl alcohol) but now I dont have a mounted rear sight on it and the bladed steel rear sight is in my hand not on the rear of the gun.

I feel foolish taking this to a gun smith for such a trivial problem, but what other option do I have?
Anyone else ever had this issue?
 

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Front sight on my Beretta 8040 keeps coming loose. I use fingernail polish for loctite on screws so I tried it on the front sight. Stuff doesn't like heat, it came loose.

I just recently put some superglue on it, just a touch, in a couple places. I'll see how it works.

If super glue fails I'll put the sight in and center punch the bottom of the slot. Should be absolutely solid.
 

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Well, a gunsmith might be able to machine you a rear sight, that matches the dovetail on yours better...something that could be drifted in, like they are supposed to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
How much force is ok to "drift them in"
I have one of those small copper hammers used for punches.
Should I use aregular hammer?
Will I bend the sight when i use too much force or hurt the slide?
 

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Did you put the sight back in the same side as it came out of? There is a bit of truth in this, as most times you take the dovetailed part out of the same side that you put it back in the part you took it out of.

If you need to make the part a bit looser, then you can take some fine sandpaper, I would go around 240 or 320 and even possibly finer than that, and make the part a bit smaller. To do this, you place your sandpaper on a flat surface, and start to rub the bottom of the sight around on the paper. Light pressure, with nice and even strokes, is all that is needed, as this is a sand a bit, try the fit, and sand a bit, try the fit.....repeat until you get the "snug" but not loose fit needed. Remember you are trying to remove the same amount of material from the whole bottom of the sight, and not change the angle of the flat base. Paying attention to how much, and where, bluing you take off initially will help you aquire the feel you need for this work. After you get the fit you need, a bit of cold blue helps stave off rust, finish up with that step and then do the final install. Time will be spent by you, but not alot of money, and then you will know what to do next time you might need to do something like this.

You can go too far in removing this material, and that is where a bit of stippling of the sight channel would be needed afterwards. That is only an "ooops" fix, and if you don't go too fast/far; not needed at all.

I have needed to do this in the past with a few sights. Not a big deal, just time consuming if you want to get it done correctly without needing new parts because you figured you could take just a bit more off this time.
 

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FWIW, it should actually require a small bit of force to get the sight back into place within the dovetail. Not 12 ounce ballpein force, but sometimes a bit more than you might normally think is necessary. Finding that nice place in the correct zone of "enough" can be tricky, but that is how one learns to get things done.

If it just slide in without trying/force, then it will be too loose to be useful in the long run.


If the sight was sliding in the dovetail already, then it sounds like it is already too loose. Sanding the base would not help you in this instance. Although sanding may help you get it back into the dovetail, after that you will need to stipple the bottom of the channel to hold it in place better, along with the loctite.

Fitting parts is always a fun part of owning a firearm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I already had a guy at my local range do it.
I may go that route.
Not enthused about our Glock style sights.

I locktited the sight on only one side at home after my range guy got it back in ( since I did not want to eject it again I only had a small area to work with)
seems to hold so far.
 
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