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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
SOURCE:
Self-Defense Tip: Three Concealed Carry Training Basics | The Truth About Guns

SUMMARY (click on link above for full story):

Practice Your Draw
The best gun to have in a gunfight is the gun you have. So . . . have a gun. In your hand. Sounds simple. It isn’t. Especially if you’re wearing all the clobber you wear in real life. You have to get the stuff out of the way, get a good grip (start as you mean to finish) and present your gun.
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Get Off the X
As someone who had a front row seat to England’s Ecstasy epidemic I love that expression. It goes perfectly with the old adage “The only gunfight you’re guaranteed to win is the one you never have.”​
Put ‘em together and there you have it: it’s more important to train yourself to move away from danger—and/or towards cover/concealment—than it is to know how to run/shoot your gun.

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Mentally Rehearse DGUs
Never mind multi-tasking. The human mind can’t contemplate more than one thing at a time. It can ping-pong between ideas in seconds, but it does so sequentially.​
Bottom line: no one can—or should—maintain high-level situational awareness 24/7. At some point, you will “lose” yourself in your conversation, club sandwich, movie, sleep, etc.

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Howdy TexasDeputy,

Good post!

Usually when someone post a thread like this it's usually lameo BS from a Keyboard Kommando that he dreamed while playing XBox but this is great advice, especially about drawing your gun.

This is the reason I'm not a fan of IWB carry especially with holsters like to Supertuck because, face it, they are SuperSlow.

Paul
 

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I agree with all three summaries.

1. Practice is always a good thing!

2. There is nothing wrong with retreating a few feet (or more) if necessary to improve your tactical position. Don't end up being the BG's static target.

3. None of us can plan for everything nor be ready 100% of the time. It's called being human.
 
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As a motorcyclist, playing the what would I do if, is just a continuation. It is true that you cannot be on top of it all the time. But you should be able to recognize times when your head should be on a swivel, and times when it should be ok to take a deep breath and close one eye.
Situational awareness, Situational awareness, Situational awareness
 

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The video and the comments at the end of the article are worth looking at. As an extension to this thread. The following comments/questions are aimed at civilian (those that have no job responsibity as LEO's) CC's:

1. The need to draw a weapon quickly is this a real - high probability - situation or is the ability "to sneak" a weapon into one's hand a more likely scenario, especially if one is situationally aware? See example under point four.

2. Getting off the X is good but some old timers and those who are disabled either need to really improve on this if it is possible, and if not, what are the alternatives? Mobility limitations may necessitate a different strategy or different tactics. What do you guys think?

3. Thinking of likely scenarios is mandatory. Thinking about unusual situations is difficult because they are rare occurences and as such we are not as likely to think of them. It is at this point that other peoples "strange/unusual" experiences can help broaden out our own limited imaginations.

4. We need to discuss cooperative defensive tactics with our spouse and other family/household members. For example, when I was walking with my girl friend - we were both carrying - we noticed that two unsavory characters started to close in on us at an angle that would intersect with us. This was in the day time in the downtown area that was relatively deserted at the time. It was a Saturday and we were going for a Pizza. We acknowledged the situation to one another and based on previous tactical discussion created distance from one another at an angle that made it extremely difficult for both us to be attacked at once. By doing this we created "shooting lane" where the BG intentions would be revealed if they started to close in on one of us. During this process we each had our hands on our guns - hers in her pocketbook, me in my front pocket. As the situation unfolded the BG's changed the angle of their walk and nothing developed. Pretty sure they were up to no good and they adjusted their tactics to ours.
 
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Thanks for the info. Wifey mentioned the other day that she thinks about what she would do in case something "goes down," and asked if that was crazy. My answer was, at least you're thinking ahead. Now, if I can just convince her to train more and get CHL.
 

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Our rule is we sit with our backs to the door and and we pretty much have an exit or saftey strategy on any place we go to we have practiced this and both carry .ist rule you never realy win a gun fight but it is better to stand in court that rest in the ground 2nd rule if it is lefe threating use you fire arm
3rd rule make sure whats in the direction you are shooting

jhp
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Our rule is we sit with our backs to the door and and we pretty much have an exit or saftey strategy on any place we go to we have practiced this and both carry .ist rule you never realy win a gun fight but it is better to stand in court that rest in the ground 2nd rule if it is lefe threating use you fire arm
3rd rule make sure whats in the direction you are shooting

jhp

Backs to the DOOR or to the wall?

We were taught never to sit with our backs to the door - we could not see what was approaching
 

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My wife no longer questions me about keeping my back where no one can come up behind me and we always try our best to have more than one way to get out of danger if at all possible.

I would much rather try to avoid trouble than risk injury or death by acting Macho and standing my ground, if there is a choice!
 

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I have always considered highway reststops as one of the most dangerous places a traveler can frequent, when we do have to use one we make sure our weapons are readily at hand, and if things don't pass the smell test we are out of there faster than you can say go!

Highway reststops especially on the interstates are well known for being a major area for drug dealing. Nobody in their right mind wants to get in the middle of a drug deal gone bad!
 
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