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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I bought my first double barrel shotgun yesterday. For $175 I just couldn't pass it up. I know this is at least a pre-68 due to the lack of serial number. I'm wondering if anyone could possibly narrow it down a little more. The limited research I've done, I've found out that the "5100" is the part number for the action. It seems that the 5100 action was used for several different models. I've attached pictures of all of the markings. Any Stevens experts out there? I know it's not the deal of the century. From what I've found I paid about average price. For me it's more about the history and nostalgia. When I shouldered it the first time and brought that bead up, it just felt right.


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I don't know a lot about the years, but they're solid old guns and I've seen a good half dozen of 'em over a 4 year period at an LGS going for 200-300 dollars. Those guns were in great shape, no play, tight lock up, even decent wood. I didn't have the disposable income at the time, but I was tempted to pick one up. I need another double like I need herpes. :rofl: And, those old guns have fixed chokes and are not steel shot compatible.
 
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BTW, those old Stevens/Savage SxSs DO fit well. That was one of the attractions for ME. I don't think you paid too much at all. In fact, I think you got a decent deal. :D
 
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Boy, that looks almost identical to mine, though it's a 20 ga. I think both are the Model 311.The model number was only stamped on the side after 1950, IIRC. The 311s were made from 1926-1945, according to a Stevens model/date chart I found but the 311A isn't listed so I assume it came after. My guess is that both shotguns are 1940-'45 vintage and are most likely the Model 311. I haven't been able to find info much on the old doubles to identify them with.
 
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You acquired a fine old shotgun, there. I have a Stevens single barrel 12 gauge that is an early model 94. I compared the relatively few parts* that make up an old Stevens single against the Numrich parts catalogs that I found here https://www.gunpartscorp.com/gun-manufacturer/savstevspgfld/shotguns-sav to make that determination. I don't know if it will help you fine tune your research, but it worked for me.

*Really, it's remarkable how simple those old shotguns are - the key, I think, to their reliability and popularity, even today.
 
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My first double was a Stevens 311 12 ga with 26 inch barrels choked imp & mod. This was my first designated bird gun which I used for quail, grouse, dove and rabbit for many years. The gun just felt right and hunting grouse on timber tracts in the Mts. of Va and NC required a fast handling gun. If you bought a Stevens double for $175 you did good. Not the prettiest girl on the block but she won't let you down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah definitely not the prettiest, but it's solid. The action is smooth but locks up with authority and has zero play when locked. The guy said it's been good squirrel gun for years, but hurricane Michael completely destroyed the area he hunts (as well as his home). He's living in a RV right now and has to downsize his collection. I feel like I got a good deal. He threw in two boxes of #6 shells and a padded case as well. I'm sure I'll never really know when it was made because of Stevens' poor record keeping in those days. I can't wait to get it out and put some lead down range. The local range is a joint operation between the county and FWC and they have a very nice trap/skeet range I may try out. I've never shot clays in a formal setting before. It might be fun!

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Yeah definitely not the prettiest, but it's solid. The action is smooth but locks up with authority and has zero play when locked. The guy said it's been good squirrel gun for years, but hurricane Michael completely destroyed the area he hunts (as well as his home). He's living in a RV right now and has to downsize his collection. I feel like I got a good deal. He threw in two boxes of #6 shells and a padded case as well. I'm sure I'll never really know when it was made because of Stevens' poor record keeping in those days. I can't wait to get it out and put some lead down range. The local range is a joint operation between the county and FWC and they have a very nice trap/skeet range I may try out. I've never shot clays in a formal setting before. It might be fun!

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Good solid double barrels, and the singles were solid also. Should be a great shooter, but being a 16 gauge, you will need to take up reloading if you are going to shoot it much.

Shotguns[edit]Starting in 1872, Stevens began producing single-barreled shotguns based on their tip-up rifles and pistols. The first was the Model 30 offered in 14 gauge but soon followed by 10, 12, 16, and 20 gauges.[SUP][16][/SUP]
In 1876, Stevens produced its first double-barreled shotgun, the Three Trigger Model, which used a third trigger to unlock the action, and was offered in 10 and 12 gauges.[SUP][16][/SUP]
Between 1900 and 1916 Stevens produced 26 single-barreled shotgun models, eight exposed hammer double-barreled models, and seven hammerless double-barreled models including a sidelock design, the Model 250.[SUP][16][/SUP]

Stevens 522 Trap Gun​

In 1907, Stevens was approached by John Browning and offered the design of a pump-action, hammerless, take-down, repeating shotgun that would become the Model 520 and 620 shotguns.[SUP][17][/SUP] The Model 520, easily recognized by its distinctive double-hump receiver, first appeared in Stevens' 1909 Catalog #52 and remained in production until 1939.[SUP][16][/SUP][SUP][18][/SUP]
In 1927, Stevens produced the Model 620, a streamlined version of the 520, and it remained in production until 1955. Stevens provided a prototype Model 520 trench gun to the U.S. military in 1918 for use in World War I but it was never produced in quantity. Both the Model 520A and 620A were produced (as the M520-30 and M620) for the U.S. military during World War II, in trench, riot, and training versions. In all, over 45,000 were made during WW II and many remained in service through the Vietnam War.[SUP][19][/SUP]
 
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My Stevens 12 Ga side by side. I used it for a while in CAS but the locking lug between the barrels made it difficult to load/unload fast but it still serves on as a Tree Rat eliminator. Good strong old guns enjoy yours.

 
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I have a Model 311 (not A) 20 ga. that I bought when I turned 14. Born in 1943 so that makes it 1957. Full choke and modified. Great little gun.
 

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Found this on another forum... How it is helpful...

Its a quote from someone else on the 5100 age from another site.

"Should have been made sometime between 1931 and 1941. If you really need a more exact date, search other answers for the Stevens Historian's address. This is one of those things I have in my notes but didn't document the source. Stevens introduced this gun as the Model 5000 in the early 1920's, changed the designation to 5100 about 1931, and changed it again about 1941 to the Model 311. Some were marked with both 5100 and 311.

https://www.shootersforum.com/shotg...-stevens-5100-how-can-you-tell-when-made.html
 
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