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The above is a good explanation, except I am a Lefty so the Safety is on the wrong side for me. Could some Lefty's go over your method of Draw.
I either buy guns with an ambi safety already on it, have an ambi safety put on it after I buy it or it gets relegated to being a range gun- if I waste the money on it at all. If it's a DA/SA that I can decock safely (see my first post on the thread), then I just ignore the safety completely. The right handed safety on my little Beretta Tomcat has never been used at all, as an example.

I ain't carrying a gun that I can't manipulate safely, quickly and efficiently for self defense. I'm not drawing and then having to break my grip on the gun to reach over and disengage a safety. I also don't like hitting the safety while the gun's still in the holster.

Draw stroke is simple.

Get a high grip on the gun (web of the hand high on the back strap, indexing the placement of the fingers based on the location of the middle knuckle of the middle finger's contact on the bottom of the trigger guard) with the thumb appropriately close- but not in contact- with the safety( with a 1911, I draw with a 'high thumb' and sweep it down disengaging the safety as I 'close' my fist around the gun as it levels out). Once the gun is clear of the holster, and as it starts to rotate muzzle forward, the thumb disengages the safety after the support hand meets the shooting hand (coming from underneath) and then the arms extend towards the target.

If shooting 1 handed, the rotation of the muzzle to level happens at the same time as the safety is disengaged.
 

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My carry piece is PF9, DAO, with no safety. I carry with 1 in the chamber.

On occasions that I carry my 1911 Thrasher, Safety on, 1 in the chamber.
 

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DA only - safety is moot. SA/DA depending upon the existence of a de-cocker. SA/DA no decocker? Safety on. SA only? safety on unless it has both a grip and a trigger safety. Always one in the pipe.
 
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I carry my HK USP40 safety off. The only striker fired pistols I own with manual safeties are my S&W M&P pistols and if carrying one I carry safety on.
 

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If you have to wonder, then you need more time on the gun.

I don't buy into the, 'I'll forget the safety', argument. You saw what gun you strapped on and you better already know what it takes to make it work.

I also don't buy the, 'I'll get confused by jumping between guns', argument either. If that happens, then one might need to be handling your guns more often. I can tell my supposedly identical SAA clones apart by how they feel in my hand, so don't tell me going from a double stack 1911 like my Para to a Witness is going to confuse me.
The point made was not to have two different methods with the same gun. During a period of time I was carrying both a Combat Commander and a Sig DA/SA gun without a safety. I could switch between the two (although I still don't like DA/SA actions), but I never carried the Colt sometimes with the safety on and sometimes with the safety off.
 

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The point made was not to have two different methods with the same gun. During a period of time I was carrying both a Combat Commander and a Sig DA/SA gun without a safety. I could switch between the two (although I still don't like DA/SA actions), but I never carried the Colt sometimes with the safety on and sometimes with the safety off.
I forget who posted above that he switched between one in the camber and with the same gun empty and I had this same thought. Consistency is the key as you point out. People worry about the micro second it takes to switch off the manual safety when the real pause would be...it there one in the pipe or do I have to rack the slide?
 

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I was just wondering how most carry their guns that have a safety. Safety on or safety off. I do both depending on where I am going.
Any of mine that are equipped with a manual safety, I train with it as such, and carry it as such. To me, if it has a manual safety, then use it, but you do have to train with it in that operation. JMHO.
 

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I tend to prefer autos without safeties: think GLOCK and Sig DA/SA. My Sig365 has no safety and I pocket carry it.

Safetied autos, I don't mind and I will carry them. My XDM in 10mm has the grip safety Springfield autos are known for in their xD models but you don't have to think about them as it is pressed if you grip the pistol with a good grip.

As to revolvers, I'll carry them as my sidearm when hunting and don't take any training to get used to.
 

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I used to carry pistols with safeties. As things have progressed (and humans have regressed), I've found that keeping things simple is not just a principle or taught- it's the way things should be in the modern world. And in "modern", I'm not talking within the past decade or this century. I mean 'today'.
"Safety" is between your ears when it comes to firearms. With pistols, a "safety" is an extra move for muscle memory. Don't get me wrong, I grew up on a 1911A1 and even years down the road I sought out another similar pistol in the way of a SIG P220SAO. I spent time with a Ruger P89DC that I thought had very good ergonomics for a defensive pistol just on the cusp of "concealed carry" actually becoming a reality in a lot of states including mine. Back in those days I bought magazines like Guns and Ammo at the newsstands or grocery stores and I read articles. Pre-internet days is what I'm saying for most folks. I started to reload for rifle and I got into monthly competition. The day I shot my first Glock was the day I advanced in the realm of handguns, self protection, competition, and a better sense of the world around me. Y2K came along and changed a few venues. Then the hurricanes down south and martial law and looting and all of that crap got me better fixed on what "self-preservation" entails and what it should look like in a handbook sort of like a roadmap.
First time I picked up and shot a Glock pistol sort of changed my world for good. IIRC twas sometime in 1998 when I saw a G27 at LGS and fell in love (had to have it). The Glock pistols were in the 3rd generation by then. The 3rd is the best IMO. I'm still stuck there and with what works for me. I've had most of the Glock pistol models go through my hands. Worked with, shot no telling how many tens of thousands of rounds with. I did take a Glock Armorer's course in 2010. Lawrence, Kansas matter of fact. This furthered my understanding of a "combat handgun". Maybe, just maybe they had some really good Kool-ade. Maybe I just happened to be thirsty.
But here's the thing- what do you really need an external safety for exactly?
Oh I carried cocked and locked on those 1911A1s and the SIG P220SAO was perfect as in I could chamber a round with the safety on! My muscle memory and combat courses taught me via the USMC back in 1982 and 1883 got me through some rough times in following years.
Now that the taxpayer and the government are not supporting my development like they once were, I've gone out on my own to be the best I can be. The survival skills are still there (thank you taxpayers). One lasting difference between myself and the average civilian is I'll kill my enemy without remorse. Typical civilians will fold, lay down, give in due to some form of moral perception that humans are inherently good.
I'll tell you that humans are inherently evil. Just take a look back to 9/11 in this country. You have neighbors and friends willing to kill over filling their car with gasoline.
Humans are pathetic. Humans are a disease devouring this planet.
Did I get too far off subject?
In the real world it's my belief that any "safety" on a handgun is a hindrance to muscle memory and in the mindset. It's an excuse or roadblock to the will to kill. That so-called "safety" can and will get you killed.
I completely understand folks want to get a CC permit. But most don't even know why and never plan on defending themselves. Apparently it's just a popular thing to do and giving $$ to the master.
 

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Unless it has a DA trigger, like a DA revolver or my TCP, I insist on a thumb safety. I will not carry a Glock style pistol like the Glocks, the XD family (some have thumb safeties now, don't they?), and the like. I'm not a fan of DA/SA semiautos either. Taking your first shot with a DA revolver and then switching to a 1911 has never seemed like a great idea to me.

Condition one or DA.



But when do you need to do that? With a DA/SA semiauto, you have to do it every time you set it up for carry. I guess if you've decided to take a SA shot, and change your mind, but how often does that happen? I agree with Ickthus; pulling a trigger and de-thumbing the hammer is about the sketchiest procedure in all of gun handling. And yes, if you pull the trigger to get past the sear and then release it during the rest of the lowering process, the safeties in many handguns should save you - revolvers included. But that's just adding more complexity and jerky movements to an already touchy process.

One of the best answers I've ever seen to all of these types of questions is this:

View attachment 467249

DA when you want it, SA when you want it, and virtually no chance of snagging. Safe and precise when you need it.
What holster(s) do you use with that beauty?
 

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Just reread through this thread and noticed not a lot of comments addressing grip safeties. Many people think of the thumb safety with SA autos but little discussion is given to grip safeties. I mentioned it briefly regarding my XDM s all Springfield xd models have a short grip safety at the top of the grip - it is not at all like the grip safeties on 1911s but offer the same level of action.
 

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Eye M sew paranoid thet eye even have to have a grip safety on my revolvers!
 

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Whenever I draw my handgun, I sweep the safety off. Even if the firearm doesn't even HAVE a safety, my thumb goes through the motion. If I am in extremis I do not want to worry about whether I need to take that step, so I just train to do it.
 

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I was just wondering how most carry their guns that have a safety. Safety on or safety off. I do both depending on where I am going.
I prefer guns without a safety. If I am carrying a gun with a safety it is off. Regardless of what I am carrying (safety or no safety) when I practice I include sweeping the safety off, even if the gun does not have one. Just incase the safety gets bumped on. Often I am seen sweeping the safety off on a gun that does not have one. To me it is about muscle memory and in a stressed situation I may not remember if my gun that day has a safety or not.
 
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I prefer guns without a safety. If I am carrying a gun with a safety it is off. Regardless of what I am carrying (safety or no safety) when I practice I include sweeping the safety off, even if the gun does not have one. Just incase the safety gets bumped on. Often I am seen sweeping the safety off on a gun that does not have one. To me it is about muscle memory and in a stressed situation I may not remember if my gun that day has a safety or not.
It's what I like about a decocked hammer gun. No matter if I'm carrying one of my revolvers or an auto, one long squeeze of a DA trigger gets it into action. :D
 

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I prefer guns without a safety. If I am carrying a gun with a safety it is off. Regardless of what I am carrying (safety or no safety) when I practice I include sweeping the safety off, even if the gun does not have one. Just incase the safety gets bumped on. Often I am seen sweeping the safety off on a gun that does not have one. To me it is about muscle memory and in a stressed situation I may not remember if my gun that day has a safety or not.
I presume you are talking about carrying a 1911 with the thumb safety off but with hammer down. No way would I ever carry any 1911 with a chambered round, hammer cocked but thumb safety off. And, for those who haven't thought about it, the Taurus MilPro line is a SA to DA model - it's striker is cocked when racked and in SA mode - thus the thumb safety. The PT140 and PT145 were the first semiauto pistols I bought and have always activated the thumb safety when chambering a round. But they have a DA action with second strike capability. If the shot fails to fire with first trigger pull you can continue pulling the trigger over and over without"recocking". I've heard some here mention that they don't have the second strike capability and I've never understood why unless they have a first generation MilPro.

It's what I like about a decocked hammer gun. No matter if I'm carrying one of my revolvers or an auto, one long squeeze of a DA trigger gets it into action. :D
I like DA/SAs too. Sig practically cornered the market on these before striker fired autos became popular. Taurus' 800 series should have competed well with these but not sure if Taurus still pushes the 800s anymore. I will say having the decocker mounted on the frame made it easier to access than the "Beretta like" slide mounted decockers.
 

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I presume you are talking about carrying a 1911 with the thumb safety off but with hammer down. No way would I ever carry any 1911 with a chambered round, hammer cocked but thumb safety off..
well throwing some wood on the fire here--1911--half cock notch (if you want to carry it hammer down) and if series 80 then firing pin block.
I am not sure there is a more fool proof semi auto out there than a modern 1911 to be honest, course i carry mine cocked and locked.
 
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I presume you are talking about carrying a 1911 with the thumb safety off but with hammer down. No way would I ever carry any 1911 with a chambered round, hammer cocked but thumb safety off. And, for those who haven't thought about it, the Taurus MilPro line is a SA to DA model - it's striker is cocked when racked and in SA mode - thus the thumb safety. The PT140 and PT145 were the first semiauto pistols I bought and have always activated the thumb safety when chambering a round. But they have a DA action with second strike capability. If the shot fails to fire with first trigger pull you can continue pulling the trigger over and over without"recocking". I've heard some here mention that they don't have the second strike capability and I've never understood why unless they have a first generation MilPro.



I like DA/SAs too. Sig practically cornered the market on these before striker fired autos became popular. Taurus' 800 series should have competed well with these but not sure if Taurus still pushes the 800s anymore. I will say having the decocker mounted on the frame made it easier to access than the "Beretta like" slide mounted decockers.
I don't carry a 1911, if I did I guess it would be cocked and locked.
 
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