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I was just wondering how most carry their guns that have a safety. Safety on or safety off. I do both depending on where I am going.
The very few times I've carried, it has been a TCP .380 which has no safety. However there isn't one in the chamber, so it's pretty safe.
 

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I prefer DA carry, safety off, DA trigger first shot. With the PT145 or with 1911s, cocked and locked, safety on condition one.
 

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The only carry guns that I have without a safety are the TCP and the 605, all are carried with rounds ready to go, and the pistols which have them have the safety engaged.
 

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I specifically carry firearms that are safe to carry with a round in the chamber and the safety off.

I make sure I have a good holster for the position of carry and firearm that I am using for the day.

I prefer hammer fired double action firearms that have a long enough trigger pull that it would be difficult to fire it by accident.

I stay away from short trigger pulls that have only a trigger safety such as the Glock series if I am going to carry IWB. OWB in a sturdy holster is a must for actions such as the Glock type.

The only striker fired handgun I carry regularly is my Taurus PT145. I have good holsters for it and practice drawing it with my finger not on the trigger. I do not use the safety on it either.
 
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Well it depends on what is in my current carry stable and how I have improved the trigger. Example I have 2 M&P's, a service size with a finely tuned trigger, no safety. That is for range and home work. The M&P 2.0 compact also has a improved trigger, but with the ambi safety. I carry this one the most right now. One in chamber, safety on, in secure quality IWB holster. I also carry a new CZ P07, also with trigger improvements. It is a SA/DA decocker style pistol. So I carry it decocked in DA, that is my safety.

However I train,train, train. Much more with a pistol having a safety - if I am going to use it. Then there are my occasional carry, like the CPX 3 - also with an improved trigger ( hot weather carry ), the long DA pull serves as my safety, carried in a pocket holster. A LCP2 also with an improved trigger, but with a safety that I use in its pocket holster. When I carry my 1911's it is cocked and locked - OWB in a quality leather holster. The key once again to using a safety successfully is to train until it is second nature.
 

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Depends on the firearm platform.

With SA/DA such as the CZ PCR and third generation Smith and Wesson auto, no safety on.

1911 platform, safety on.
 

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Depends on the gun.

Single action semi autos are carried safety on.

Double actions that I can mechanically decock rather than pulling the trigger and riding the hammer down with a thumb (or, in the case of my little Beretta Tomcat, load the chamber by tipping the barrel up) are carried hammer down, safety off.

Why the mechanical decocker requirement?

Because disabling all the automatic safeties there may be in the gun by pulling the trigger and riding the hammer down with only my thumb gives me the heebee-jeebees and strikes me as a negligent discharge waiting for a place to happen. Demon Murphy seems to keep a close eye on my and there's no sense in giving him an inside track to mischief.

Many moons ago, Smith and Wesson came out with their 3rd Generation bottom feeders and they found a ready market in the law enforcement community. Since the safeties on the 3rd Gen Smiths are a) slide mounted instead of frame mounted and b) flip up for off rather than down, the LEO community used the safeties to decock and carried them hammer down, safety off. A few of my shooting buddies happen to be LEO's at the time, so I picked up their methodology on the 4006 that was my primary carry at the time. It's carried on through the years and has been applied to any DA bottom feeder I carry.

If the DA trigger pull is as heavy as a DA revolver (8 pounds plus), then I see no need for a manual safety. If the gun in question has one of those lowest common denominator actions where there's a single action trigger weight on a double action trigger stroke, then a manual safety is needed. If my Series 70 Combat Commander with the stock 5 1/2 pound trigger pull needs a manual safety, then that so-called 'light double action' with the identical trigger pull weight does, too.
 

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I'm old school and schooled well. Years of training, uses and muscle memory.
Safety on always. When gripping the gun, finger on safety, as you clear the holster, Safety is disengaged by the time you clear holster. While bringing the gun up on target you cock the hammer. This is muscle memory as your brain is verifying the need to engage, back stop and clear shooting lane. You have time to do all of this in one fluid motion as you get a sight picture. Anyone thinking different has not trained to use a weapon correctly or has never been hunting or been hunted. it is simple to perfect.
Now i say the same thing about driving a car with a stick shift. Do I need to tell you about walking to school? LOL
 

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Depends on the gun.

Single action semi autos are carried safety on.

Double actions that I can mechanically decock rather than pulling the trigger and riding the hammer down with a thumb (or, in the case of my little Beretta Tomcat, load the chamber by tipping the barrel up) are carried hammer down, safety off.

Why the mechanical decocker requirement?

Because disabling all the automatic safeties there may be in the gun by pulling the trigger and riding the hammer down with only my thumb gives me the heebee-jeebees and strikes me as a negligent discharge waiting for a place to happen. Demon Murphy seems to keep a close eye on my and there's no sense in giving him an inside track to mischief.

Many moons ago, Smith and Wesson came out with their 3rd Generation bottom feeders and they found a ready market in the law enforcement community. Since the safeties on the 3rd Gen Smiths are a) slide mounted instead of frame mounted and b) flip up for off rather than down, the LEO community used the safeties to decock and carried them hammer down, safety off. A few of my shooting buddies happen to be LEO's at the time, so I picked up their methodology on the 4006 that was my primary carry at the time and it's carried on through the years and has been applied to any DA bottom feeder I carry.

If the DA trigger pull is as heavy as a DA revolver (8 pounds plus), then I see no need for a manual safety. If the gun in question has one of those lowest common denominator actions where there's a single action trigger weight on a double action trigger stroke, then a manual safety is needed. If my Series 70 Combat Commander with the stock 5 1/2 pound trigger pull needs a manual safety, then that so-called 'light double action' with the identical trigger pull weight does, too.
No more than dropping the hammer back down and a revolver. My Beretta has a block. As soon as the hammer moves let go of the trigger. When the trigger reaches reset the hammer can fall as hard as it wants as the trigger block is in play. Block the hammer, let go of the trigger and its safe to decock the hammer the rest of the way.
know your equipment , know yourself, work within the limits of both.
 

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Safety On.

All mine have safeties that have a very similar sweep.
 

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The only carry gun I have with a safety is my PT145 MilPro. I keep it cocked & locked. The thumb sweep to disengage it feels very natural on the draw. All of my other carry guns are DAOs without safeties.
 

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No more than dropping the hammer back down and a revolver. My Beretta has a block. As soon as the hammer moves let go of the trigger. When the trigger reaches reset the hammer can fall as hard as it wants as the trigger block is in play. Block the hammer, let go of the trigger and its safe to decock the hammer the rest of the way.
know your equipment , know yourself, work within the limits of both.
Don't like doing it on a wheel gun either. Matter of fact, that's one of the reasons that I learned how to shoot a DA revolver double action.

I've been shooting handguns since before the Iranians took US hostages and have lowered a hammer successfully many, many times on a plethora of different bottom feeders and revolvers.

I still recognize that it's a ND waiting for a place to happen, so I try to avoid having to do it at all.
 
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I prefer a safety anymore...why you may ask...grandkids I would answer. Yes I keep my firearms up out of harms way and locked up. However I have learned to never underestimate the inquisitive powers of a young mind on a mission.

And yes, I carry with one in the tube and ready to fire.

Lately I have taken to carrying my Beretta Pico. The Pico does not have a manual safety, however once you chamber a round you can push a small button on the side of the frame which disconnects the trigger. If you pull the trigger it will pull rearward, it simply does not function if firing the pistol. To disengage this feature you only need to move the slide rearward a 1/4" and the trigger become fully active. I can hold the pistol in my hand and use one finger on the same hand against the rear sight to move slide rearward and activate the trigger.
 

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Unless it has a DA trigger, like a DA revolver or my TCP, I insist on a thumb safety. I will not carry a Glock style pistol like the Glocks, the XD family (some have thumb safeties now, don't they?), and the like. I'm not a fan of DA/SA semiautos either. Taking your first shot with a DA revolver and then switching to a 1911 has never seemed like a great idea to me.

Condition one or DA.

No more than dropping the hammer back down and a revolver.
But when do you need to do that? With a DA/SA semiauto, you have to do it every time you set it up for carry. I guess if you've decided to take a SA shot, and change your mind, but how often does that happen? I agree with Ickthus; pulling a trigger and de-thumbing the hammer is about the sketchiest procedure in all of gun handling. And yes, if you pull the trigger to get past the sear and then release it during the rest of the lowering process, the safeties in many handguns should save you - revolvers included. But that's just adding more complexity and jerky movements to an already touchy process.

One of the best answers I've ever seen to all of these types of questions is this:

SS651 01.jpeg

DA when you want it, SA when you want it, and virtually no chance of snagging. Safe and precise when you need it.
 
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I carry the G2C and the TH9C specifically because they have a safety.
If I didn't care about a safety, I'd probably carry a Glock.
A Glock 17 is what I have at my nightstand.

But in the heat of a gun fight, when seconds count, and my heart is pounding, and my adrenaline is surging; I don't want to accidentally shoot myself while I'm drawing my gun from my waist holster.

At the range I practice raising my gun to the target while clicking off my safety...EVERY TIME!
I recently got a Taurus TH9C so that I can also decock the hammer while carrying. The first round fires in double-action mode.
 

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Depends on the design of the gun. DA revolver (usually no safety) or autopistol; safety off with one in the chamber --> the long heavy double action trigger pull is all the safety needed in addition to a well made and fitted holster that covers the trigger. SA autopistol; safety on, hammer back with one in the chamber along with the same well made and fitted holster that covers the trigger guard. SA revolver (usually no safety); hammer down on an empty chamber.

Long gun (closed bolt gun); safety on, hammer back with one in the chamber, slung. Long gun (open bolt gun); safety on, bolt closed on empty chamber, slung.
 
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