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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just purchased a brand new Taurus 605 357 Mag revolver, have not shot it yet. Love the look, weight, and feel. The trigger is perfect: smooth as silk with a perfect stack and clean break in double action, glass-clean break in single action. It seems like the perfect revolver for practice and carry.

I took the 605 to my local gun dealer/gunsmith for a look-see before shooting, and he said the chambers were rough with clearly visible residual tool marks, possibly too rough to allow 357 shells to eject easily after the gun warms up. He pulled a used S&W 357 Mag revolver from the case as a comparison, and the S&W cylinder bores were all perfectly smooth and shiny as a mirror. I held the two revolvers side by side and looked at the cylinder bores in the Taurus 605 and the S&W, and there was noticeable waviness and dull finish in the Taurus 605 bores, certainly not the smooth/shiny bores of the S&W. I did not use any magnification to see this difference, all very clear with the naked eye.

The gunsmith recommended putting 50 rounds of 357 through the 605 to get it good and hot to see if spent cartridge #50 pops out as cleanly as spent cartridge #1. Per his advice, if the last cylinder full of 5 spent 357 Mag cartridges does not eject as easily as the first 5, it needs to go back to Taurus for service.

Question for all you Taurus 605 357 Magnum owners: how does your 605 shoot after it warms up? Has anyone had any problem with this and/or sent a 605 back to Taurus for service to correct this? I really like the 605 and look forward to shooting it. I do plan to put a significant amount of 357 through it in spite of the recoil. If the gun works as advertised with 357 Mag, I'm good with that, as I don't care about the cosmetics of the cylinder bores if that's all it is.

I won't be near a range for a couple weeks, so I would like to get some feedback and comments before then so I know what to expect.

All comments welcome!
 

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I can't speak to the Taurus 605 specifically, as I have never held one. But I do have decades of experience with revolvers. The proof is in the pudding. I would take his advice and shoot it to see if there's a problem. If there was an ejection problem I'd either send it back or polish it out myself. You can cut the handle off a cleaning rod, insert in drill, mount a slotted cleaning tip on the rod with a strip of 600 wet-or-dry sandpaper. Or buy a Flex-Hone if you want to get fancy.

Flex Hones, Flex Hone Tool for Firearms, Cylinder Hones

I've seen revolver chambers that were ruined by cleaning, with a stainless brush that was spun rather than pushed straight through. Scored the heck out of them. Usually they can be polished out.

He gave you good advice. I'd follow it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, Glenwolde - I plan to take the gunsmith's advice and put 50 rounds of factory 357 Mag through it to see how it works. Totally agree that the proof is in the pudding, as I don't care what the bores look like as long as the cartridges move in and out per spec.

If there is an ejection problem, I would probably send it back to Taurus first, then try my my hand at honing the bores.

I'm perfectly willing to hone the cylinder bores myself if it comes to that, actually sounds pretty interesting. Thanks for the "Flex Hone" link. They don't offer a 600 grit, only 400 or 800. Would 800 be too light for this?
 

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If the gun has great lockup, timing and accuracy, I would smooth out the cylinder bores myself. This will create a bonding experience between yourself and your new handgun.
 

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Good advice above. You could have spent another 3-500 dollars and bought a Smith. But why. Sure if I had the money I would buy a Smith , but in my case I got a Ruger Gp100 ( $200 cheaper than a Smith) . It had smooth bores , but if I shot 38 special first , followed by 357 ,the shells would occasionally eject hard because of carbon deposits from the 38's. I did a light polish with a dremel soft polishing bit and Mother's mag polish. You have to be careful using a dremel or any power tool and just do a little at a time. That took care of my annoyance. Shoot it first then if there is a problem , consider polishing or sending it back to Taurus. Sadly I had to trade off my Ruger to get another carry gun as my wife decided she had to have my CZ PCR.
 

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Not a 605 owner, but I completely agree with glenwolde. A visual assessment isn't adequate to see how it will perform, either positive or negative. I've had some guns that looked fine, but still had the spent cartridges bind. To play it safe, you can polish the cylinder bores with mag polish before shooting for the first time. Just be sure to clean out the residue. (Also clean residue from behind the ejector star.)
 

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Thanks, Glenwolde - I plan to take the gunsmith's advice and put 50 rounds of factory 357 Mag through it to see how it works. Totally agree that the proof is in the pudding, as I don't care what the bores look like as long as the cartridges move in and out per spec.

If there is an ejection problem, I would probably send it back to Taurus first, then try my my hand at honing the bores.

I'm perfectly willing to hone the cylinder bores myself if it comes to that, actually sounds pretty interesting. Thanks for the "Flex Hone" link. They don't offer a 600 grit, only 400 or 800. Would 800 be too light for this?
Probably, I'd go 400 and if you felt you needed even more polish you can always come back with a 800. If they are pretty rough you might be there a while starting with the 800. The 400 should solve the problem, if there is one.
 

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Oh, and if they do stick....

Be cautious getting them out. The temptation is to beat on the extractor. That's a good way to bend the extractor rod. Then you'll really have a problem. I prefer to remove the cylinder and brace as much of it as I can against a block of wood and drive them out one at a time with a hardwood dowel and a mallet. I drill a hole in the wood to accommodate the ratchet. If you attempt it with the cylinder on the gun and/or without bracing the cylinder you can also spring the crane.

Unfortunately I have seen more than my share of abused revolvers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks Glenwolde and all for the advice. I don't have a micrometer or way to gauge the diameter of the bores, but new 357 mag cartridges slip in and out with all the proper feeling. Of course, this does not account for case expansion and sticking to the cylinder walls after firing, but there appears to be the proper room to move with the cold gun. And thanks for the head's up re: first removing the cylinder before pounding out the stuck brass. When I fire the first 50 full house mags, I'll be careful to get them out without damaging the crane or ratchet. If there is any sticking, I'll use a few passes of 400 grit to dress the bores and try it again until everything works smoothly. The thought of losing the gun to Taurus for a few months while they do the fix is not appealing.
 

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Remember that the barrel end of the revolver's cylinder may have a restriction that lines up the projectile with the forcing cone. You don't want to polish that out, or accuracy may suffer.
 

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Well here's hoping this thread is all for naught, and it functions properly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
JR - yes, I noticed that. Can't insert the cartridge backwards in the bore due to that "step" at the end of the bore. If I polish the bore, I will be very careful to leave all the metal where it is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Unfortunately, it will be at least a week before I will be in a more gun-friendly area with a shooting range where I can put a box of 357 mag through the 605. I hope this is only a cosmetic issue, as the gunsmith who examined the 605 said he dropped Taurus as a product line in his shop several years ago due to customer returns and quality issues.

I will be sure to report the results here.
 

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Then he'll soon be dropping S&W for those same reasons. I've mentioned that I watched a local gunsmith check, and then return, an entire order of Smith revolvers, all 12 of them, because of timing issues. I talked to him again, in the past week, and he said that he no longer stocks them. If somebody wants one, he'll special order if for them, after telling them about the QC issues. He said that he also had one crack it's frame after less than 500 rounds of 130 grain FMJ ammunition from Federal.

The dozen guns returned were split evenly between J and K frame revolvers.
 

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Just purchased a brand new Taurus 605 357 Mag revolver, have not shot it yet. Love the look, weight, and feel. The trigger is perfect: smooth as silk with a perfect stack and clean break in double action, glass-clean break in single action. It seems like the perfect revolver for practice and carry.

I took the 605 to my local gun dealer/gunsmith for a look-see before shooting, and he said the chambers were rough with clearly visible residual tool marks, possibly too rough to allow 357 shells to eject easily after the gun warms up. He pulled a used S&W 357 Mag revolver from the case as a comparison, and the S&W cylinder bores were all perfectly smooth and shiny as a mirror. I held the two revolvers side by side and looked at the cylinder bores in the Taurus 605 and the S&W, and there was noticeable waviness and dull finish in the Taurus 605 bores, certainly not the smooth/shiny bores of the S&W. I did not use any magnification to see this difference, all very clear with the naked eye.

The gunsmith recommended putting 50 rounds of 357 through the 605 to get it good and hot to see if spent cartridge #50 pops out as cleanly as spent cartridge #1. Per his advice, if the last cylinder full of 5 spent 357 Mag cartridges does not eject as easily as the first 5, it needs to go back to Taurus for service.
Ouch! Fifty rounds of .357? For what it's worth, I don't think I have more than ten rounds of full house factory loaded .357 through mine. With each shot, I'm tempted to look down and make sure the gun is still together.

Mine is a few years old now. (2008? I'd have to dig up the receipt.). I've shot endless rounds of +P .38 through it, without ever a problem with extracting brass.

[
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
This particular gunsmith said Taurus was his best seller, kept his cases full of Taurus handguns until he saw too many come back for repair. Apparently it goes in cycles. Timing issues for a dozen guns all received together would seem to indicate something more than a QC problem, probably something more systemic at Smith. A frame crack after 500 rounds or so is more understandable
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I guess if it shoots 50 rounds of full house 357, then it proves... something, probably that I'm some kind of masochist, soon to be wearing a cast on my right hand!
 

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I have a model 605 in stainless steel. It's about 4 years old. The last time I put .357 rounds through it about a year ago, I had a binding issue with the cases in the cylinder. I didn't give it a lot of thought at the time because I was using Steel cased ammo. But now that you bring this up, I wonder if mine has similar burrs as yours. Keep us updated after you go to the range. Thanks
 

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i have a 605 poly....ive shot around 20+ of .357 rounds...Yes after a while it will heat up and the bullet shell will expand a little...but with a little tap here or there they come out easy
 
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