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As some of y'all know I bought a Jimenez ja9 a while back for $100. It was going to be my truck/boat gun but I was offered a really good price for it and ended up selling it. I had it at the range with some friends and put 50 rounds through it with no issues at all. My buddy was looking for something to keep around the hunting camp and offered me $175 for it. Sold!

I used the money to buy my PT111 which is being delivered today :)
 

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As some of y'all know I bought a Jimenez ja9 a while back for $100. It was going to be my truck/boat gun but I was offered a really good price for it and ended up selling it. I had it at the range with some friends and put 50 rounds through it with no issues at all. My buddy was looking for something to keep around the hunting camp and offered me $175 for it. Sold!

I used the money to buy my PT111 which is being delivered today :)

That's a great swap!! Congrats.
 

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I suppose that means you'll have to remove Jimenez from your Sig then?

Jimenez Arms is one of the few firearms brands that I would ever avoid. I'm sure that they work fine, but you can get a Hi-Point for about the same price, and I know for a fact that they're reliable after watching a Torture Test by Demolition Ranch in which he shot a Hi-Point C9 with another pistol yet the thing continued to function! And even then I would sooner spend like $20 more on a cheap .380 Pocket Pistol like a Ruger LCP, (even in dire financial straits) simply because it's made of higher quality materials and can serve as a dual-purpose HD/EDC firearm whereas the Hi-Point would be strictly a Home Defense firearm given its size.
 
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Not bad at all. You would have gotten about half that at a pawn shop.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I suppose that means you'll have to remove Jimenez from your Sig then?.
Strange. Sometimes it shows up and sometimes it doesn't. Maybe the older posts it shows and the new posts it doesn't....
 

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SUPER DEAL! I mean, if you want Zamak, there's always Hi Point. :rofl:
 
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Strange. Sometimes it shows up and sometimes it doesn't. Maybe the older posts it shows and the new posts it doesn't....
It's some kind of bug with Sigs, (happens to me everytime I change/modify mine too) you just gotta go back to your settings and click save until it sticks.

SUPER DEAL! I mean, if you want Zamak, there's always Hi Point. :rofl:
Or the vast majority of .22 caliber firearms these days... Henry Repeating Arms, Heritage Arms, Marlin, Walther, and many other supposedly quality brands use ZAMAK in the construction of their .22s unbeknownst to the average consumer. That's why it's so important to be vigilant and thoroughly research each firearm prior to purchase, otherwise you might end up spending your hard-earned money on a firearm made with inferior components and go the rest of your life shooting that firearm without ever knowing it.
In fact, many companies really Trojan Horse it on ya by only using it on components which many take for granted (butt-plates, controls, pins/screws, etc) which really ought to be constructed from steel, but the companies of today are far too concerned with keeping the costs low for the sake of profit, so they go compromising by using inferior components just because they've become an industry standard. Sad really, but thankfully not every firearms manufacturer has succumbed to this atrocious cost-saving measure and offers firearms which are built from higher quality components for a couple hundred dollars more, so you can take that 100% blued steel beauty to the range and plink all day with the pride and confidence that comes with owning the real deal while the guy besides you plinks away with his ZAMAK wonder, completely ignorant that it's made from inferior metal.
 

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It's some kind of bug with Sigs, (happens to me everytime I change/modify mine too) you just gotta go back to your settings and click save until it sticks.



Or the vast majority of .22 caliber firearms these days... Henry Repeating Arms, Heritage Arms, Marlin, Walther, and many other supposedly quality brands use ZAMAK in the construction of their .22s unbeknownst to the average consumer. That's why it's so important to be vigilant and thoroughly research each firearm prior to purchase, otherwise you might end up spending your hard-earned money on a firearm made with inferior components and go the rest of your life shooting that firearm without ever knowing it.
In fact, many companies really Trojan Horse it on ya by only using it on components which many take for granted (butt-plates, controls, pins/screws, etc) which really ought to be constructed from steel, but the companies of today are far too concerned with keeping the costs low for the sake of profit, so they go compromising by using inferior components just because they've become an industry standard. Sad really, but thankfully not every firearms manufacturer has succumbed to this atrocious cost-saving measure and offers firearms which are built from higher quality components for a couple hundred dollars more, so you can take that 100% blued steel beauty to the range and plink all day with the pride and confidence that comes with owning the real deal while the guy besides you plinks away with his ZAMAK wonder, completely ignorant that it's made from inferior metal.
Well, it's one reason I got a Ruger SR22 rather than a Walther P22. The slide on the Walther is Zamak. AND, from what I've seen, the Wather is more expensive. :rolleyes: That gun isn't actually a Walther, though, made by Umerex, famous for cheap air guns.
 

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Congrats on your negotiating a deal that ended up netting you a new Taurus Millennium G2 PT111. :)
 

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Well, it's one reason I got a Ruger SR22 rather than a Walther P22. The slide on the Walther is Zamak. AND, from what I've seen, the Wather is more expensive. :rolleyes: That gun isn't actually a Walther, though, made by Umerex, famous for cheap air guns.
Walther is weird that way, the P22 has a ZAMAK slide, yet the PPQ .22 (not to be confused with the P22Q) and 1911 .22 have Aluminum slides, while the PPK/S .22 has some proprietary mystery metal alloy slide which according to Walther isn't a zinc-aluminum alloy and is "much stronger" than ZAMAK. Even more confusing is the fact that while the P22 and PPK/S .22 are both manufactured at the Umarex factory in Arnesburg Germany, according to Walther the PPK/S .22 is manufactured by their own employees at that location rather than Walther HQ in Ulm, yet the slide legend reads "Carl Walther Ulm/Do Model PPK/S Cal .22LR".
Granted that Umarex is the parent company of Walther, so it would make sense for them to share certain factories, but the inconsistency in the quality of materials/workmanship between the two is puzzling, not to mention the number of firearms which are branded as "Walther" yet are supposedly manufactured exclusively by Umarex.
 
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And don't forget the "Walthers" that are/were manufactured by S&W, here in the USA. Don't know if that agreement is still in effect between the two companies.
How could I forget?

That's a whole other mess right there, seeing as technically Smith & Wesson never manufactured a single pistol all by themselves... The closest there was to a Smith & Wesson manufactured Walther were the PPK & PPK/S, but technically that was more of a collaboration seeing as the production of the frames and slides were outsourced to Ruger's Pine Tree investment casting, and it is rumored that the P22 and PK380 were designed as part of a collaboration between Walther/S&W much like the SW99. The partnership between Walther and Smith & Wesson ended in 2012 when Walther Arms USA setup shop in Fort Smith Arkansas, but S&W retained the license to produce the PPK(/S) until 2015, nowadays all that remains between the two companies is that S&W supposedly makes the .40/.45 barrels for the P99/PPQ (or so, I've heard) and Walther continues to produce the M&P .22 for Smith & Wesson.

I really wish that Smith & Wesson had retained the license to manufacture the PPK(/S) in the United States because unfortunately Walther Arms USA still hasn't managed to get them out the door due to an issue regarding imported German-made slides and the German Government being ridiculous. Hopefully, Walther Arms will just use the tooling they acquired from Smith & Wesson to produce slides domestically because it has already been a good year and a half since the production hit a standstill thanks to the aforementioned issue.
 

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Sweet upgrade, dude....:nopics:
 

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Way to go, PT99AF; that's a heck of a step up!

Or the vast majority of .22 caliber firearms these days... Henry Repeating Arms, Heritage Arms, Marlin, Walther, and many other supposedly quality brands use ZAMAK in the construction of their .22s unbeknownst to the average consumer. That's why it's so important to be vigilant and thoroughly research each firearm prior to purchase, otherwise you might end up spending your hard-earned money on a firearm made with inferior components and go the rest of your life shooting that firearm without ever knowing it.
In fact, many companies really Trojan Horse it on ya by only using it on components which many take for granted (butt-plates, controls, pins/screws, etc) which really ought to be constructed from steel, but the companies of today are far too concerned with keeping the costs low for the sake of profit, so they go compromising by using inferior components just because they've become an industry standard. Sad really, but thankfully not every firearms manufacturer has succumbed to this atrocious cost-saving measure and offers firearms which are built from higher quality components for a couple hundred dollars more, so you can take that 100% blued steel beauty to the range and plink all day with the pride and confidence that comes with owning the real deal while the guy besides you plinks away with his ZAMAK wonder, completely ignorant that it's made from inferior metal.
Yes, it's so inferior while he shoots it for the rest of his life without knowing it.... That's some blued-steel-grade irony in that post right there.
 

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Way to go, PT99AF; that's a heck of a step up!



Yes, it's so inferior while he shoots it for the rest of his life without knowing it.... That's some blued-steel-grade irony in that post right there.
Assuming the zamak slide don't crack. :rofl:
 

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Way to go, PT99AF; that's a heck of a step up!



Yes, it's so inferior while he shoots it for the rest of his life without knowing it.... That's some blued-steel-grade irony in that post right there.
Yep, that was the joke.

My post was intended to be a sarcastic satire of the folks who are so absurdly against the use of ZAMAK that even in small caliber firearms which scarcely need strong metals to withstand the limited chamber pressure/heat generated by .22LR, especially when ZAMAK is only used on low stress components, that they are willing to pay hundreds of dollars more for an all steel firearm.

I've stated multiple times before on this very forum that ZAMAK is not the same as the pot metal used in the old Ring of Fire/Saturday Night Specials of old, but rather an industry standard alloy used in a variety of applications, including small caliber firearms by trusted manufacturers who obviously wouldn't risk being sued into bankrupcy by using inferior, structurally unsound materials, and that cases of slide fractures on the Walther P22 is a legacy issue which has long since been corrected, and only happened under circumstances which would have bulged a steel slide or cracked an aluminum slide just the same, namely catastrophic ammo failure such as cartridge blowouts.
 
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