Taurus Firearm Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,829 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm interested in getting a new rifle scope for my son's 300 Win Mag. The Remington 770 came with one on it when it was purchased. The problem is, he likes to target shoot at longer ranges than 100 yards. With the scope he has, (sorry, don't know the brand) as he is sighting through the current scope, the cross hairs cover the bullseye. I don't know anything about scopes so I am hoping someone can lead me in the right direction. I know there are a lot of shoters out there that are scope savy. We'd like to get a better scope for longer distance shooting. Without spending a fortune, what should we be looking for?
I'd like to know mfg. names and scope numbers like 4 X 500 or 10 X 40 or what ever. See? I don't know what to look for. :(
Help would be appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,348 Posts
There are so many choices out there that's it's amazing. The scope that came with the 770 is a cheapie and no big deal if you get rid of it. Okay, first of all, you can't go wrong with a Nikon Prostaff. A Redfield Revolution would be good as well. 3x9x40 is kind of the industry standard magnification so you might want to look for that one. Personally, I have a Tasco World class 3X9X40, and it's all the scope I need. In addition, it costs about a third of the other two. It has a lifetime warranty, and has held up pretty well on my CVA Hunterbolt .50 cal muzzleloader.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,283 Posts
For really long range you might want to find a scope with a reticle that has a very fine crosshair, and maybe a BDC reticle.
That was what I had on my Mossberg 30-06, and it was a Nikon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
I've got an older Nikon Prostaff on my 7mm mag that has very fine crosshairs. When I first got the rifle, the Tasco that was on there would cover a clay at 100 yards but this Nikon won't do it until about 275 or so
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,283 Posts
This was what my scope had, when zeroed at 100 yards, the circles represented 100 yard increments in distance.
Reticles_BDC_L.jpg

But that assumed a hunting round with a muzzle velocity of 2800FPS.
The only way you could tell if the calibration is right is of course to shoot a few rounds at all the ranges and adjust your POA.
It would be close as is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,191 Posts
Okay, let's break down the numbers on a standard 3-9x40 scope.

The first set of numbers is the magnification level, in this case the scope will magnify from 3 times normal vision and can be adjusted to 9 times normal vision.

The large second number is the size of the viewing lenses of the scope, in this case that would be a 40 mm objective lens in the front. Generally anything between 15 - 30 mm is considered a rimfire rifle scope. They aren't made to handle heavy recoil, but provide decent accuracy and sight pictures.

As far as reticles go, there are a slew of options available. Below is a chart with some of the more popular ones, and it's always a good thing to read your scopes manual to find out exactly how to use yours.



Popular brand names include BSA, Barska, Weaver, Leupold, and EOTech. You can buy a serviceable scope for under $100 that will give good accuracy, but you can also go with a scope that costs a few thousand dollars and not hit a thing. Best bet is buying something reasonable in your budget, and then if you feel the need to upgrade you can. Some things to look for on the packaging are "Nitrogen Filled", "Shock-Proof", "Water-Proof" to help keep the settings zeroed in on your target shot after shot.

Here are a couple shots i took of my new BSA scope that i got for my Marlin 795, it's a 4x30 rimfire scope that was a great upgrade from the factory 4x20 scope that came with the gun. Running a couple mags would throw the zero off so much it was almost worthless. This shouldn't have happened on simply a .22, but what should i expect for free when you buy a $125 NIB gun i suppose.







The BSA is awesome though, and definitely did it's job at 50 yards. I didn't feel like marching out 100 yards to post targets, so i just stuck with 50 since i know i adjusted it in at least that close. I'm glad it also has see through dust covers with one tinted for glare reduction, makes shooting against the sun that much easier. Only thing better would be if they were flip up covers, but i won't complain for only spending $29.99 on it at Gander Mountain of all places.

 
  • Like
Reactions: BBGun

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,283 Posts
Actually the number in mm. is the objective lens on the front of the scope.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,191 Posts
My mistake, i should have made that distinction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,191 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: 20361

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,557 Posts
I have a Leupold 3-12x40 on my Ruger 300 WinMag. I wanted something that would allow for me to use it in the woods where shots are never more than 50 yds but I wanted a higher magnification for some longer range shots in the fields surrounding(300-400 yds). I just stayed with the standard duplex recticle since I didnt want to lose them in the occasional limb and to allow better sighting during low light hours. On my 17 HM2s, I have a 4-16x50 and two 6-24X50 fine duplex scopes on them. These are my target shooting guns that allow a very clear picture of the targets but they are way too powerful for hunting tree rodents. Also, the larger the objective the better light collection you will get, allowing for better shooting in low light.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Montkun

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,829 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Thanks to all who replied to my noobie questions. Thanks especially to Montkun for taking the time to post the pics of the scope sight pictures and being so informative.
This will be of great help in our quest to find the correct scope for our uses. I'm hoping he will give his old man the old scope for my 8mm mauser. I need the help for anything over 50 yards. :)
Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,191 Posts
Regular, quilted or extra soft?
I prefer regular 2-ply, the quilted is alright on occaision though. That extra soft crap is not for me, my hands are too big and they can be way too soft sometimes. I'm not in to being my own protologist.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BBGun

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
10,379 Posts
I'm no scope expert, but, I've been told to look for "Full multicoating" as well as the other stuff (shock resistant, etc).

I've got scopes by Barska and Simmons. They're all very nice, got 'em all for under $150 (sometimes on sale).

The Barska is a 3-12x44 with an illuminated reticule (variable intensity red/green), works well for me with a 5" eye relief. The other two are both 3 - 9 x 40mm.

My favorite scope at the moment though: a Scheels 3 - 14 x 50, bought it new for $200 last year right before hunting season, holy hannah it works awesome. I've recently found out that it was actually made by Nikon for Scheels, I can keep the eye relief around 5" - 5.5" and it comes up great, crystal clear with no distortion or black spot to dance around. And being a 50mm it pulls in a lot of the ambient light so it'll work well in low light conditions (dusk/dawn/fog). This is the scope I keep mounted on my .270 and when it comes time to replace any of my other scopes this is the one I'm going to be going to. A comparable Nikon or Leupold will run over $400 easily.

One thing I was told to do when looking to buy a new scope is to reverse it and look down the objective, supposedly it'll make it easier to tell if it's fully multicoated or is going to have distortion issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,401 Posts
Leupold or Nightforce are the best but they are also the most exspensive, for target shooting or eveen hunting Weaver makes a 3-10 power Mil-dot scope that Midway uasully has on sale that is very good, also Midway has a Bushnell Mil-dot on sale for $199.00, the weaver is $299.00, both are very good entry level long distance scopes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,369 Posts
Actually the number in mm. is the objective lens on the front of the scope.
The objective lens is supposed to go on the front? No wonder my scope never worked very well. :angel:

My advise in this thread is to buy quality scope mounts and LOCTITE them in place BEFORE you zero. Also, the scope should fit its intended purpose. While a 3-9x40 is OK for target shooting and longer distances, if you hunt and a critter darts across your path (and of course you have it on 9 power) all you will see is a blur. It takes awhile to acquire a target. If you shoot at 50 yds or less quite a bit and need quicker target acquisition, think about a red dot. These have no magnification but are just sighting devices. If you want this capability but need some magnification, they have lenses that flip into place (such as 3x and 4x) that give you the magnification you need for long shots at fixed targets.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top