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Discussion Starter #1
Hola, I was pointed this way by some folks over on the high road, where I'll be posting this same topic.

Like the title says I'm a revolver guy and already own a .357 and .44. I want to jump into the world of autos and just love the look and feel of the 24/7 pro .45. The one I am looking to purchase tomorrow, hopefully, is priced at $479, living in the "great" state of California I expect to pay a bit more for my firearms.

My questions are; how is the felt recoil or more specifically the barrel rise on this weapon? I don't really feel any discomfort shooting my .357, but the barrel rise is pretty significant (love those federal hydroshocks). Can the sights be replaced? It's not that it's difficult to bring into a sight picture I just prefer a two dot horizantal rear sight.

Most importantly the shop tried to talk me into a couple of other .45s on sale by S&W and Ruger. Please tell me that I will love this gun!
 

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Howdy and welcome to the forum. I am not going to try and sell you on a 24/7. If you do thread searches on this subject and read recent posts in this section and Gunsmithing section you will learn much. I am sure the others who own 24/7s will be right along. What other Rugers or S&W pistols are you considering? Since you seem new to a lot of this there is much to be considered. Does the gun fit your hand and feel right. Are you happy with the sights. Have you tried a 24/7 on for size or even handled one? If the grip circumference is to large, then try another model. Too short? Same thing. Part of my questions are because we have little info on what you need it or what purpose you see for it. IDPA competition? Street carry? House gun? Have you tried the other models or handled them? The only reason I have a Ruger P97DC is because the 24/7 came out after the the Ruger pistol. Otherwise the 24/7 fits me well and I have short stubby fingers and small hands. Tried the 24/7 pistol at the local shop. Fired a friends. Only few rounds. Fit well and hit where it was pointed. Recoil seemed fine. Fire standard pressure loads in the Ruger and see no need for +P .45ACPs in a short barreled pistol. Same for the 24/7. Just a personal decision. Getting to old for the +P big bore pounding for very long. Seeing as humans are various sizes and shapes it is hard to say that the 24/7 will fit you. and your hands. Smith and Wesson P99s come with several different size grips that one can tailor to fit the hand. Have you tried the trigger reach on any of the pistols you have mentioned? Is the first digit of your trigger finger able to rest on the trigger without major strain or adjustment? As you can see there is a lot to consider. All the pistols you have mentioned have varied characteristics to get to know and learn about. Some advantages go to each pistol and what ones individual needs are. I will let the 24/7 vets take over and advise.Ruger has the P97 and 345 in .45ACP. S&W has the old 645 and newer P99 series. Taurus the 24/7. All are excellent designs and have very good real world track records.Do not believe the "bad press" on the internet about any of the above pistols. There are legit complaints to be sure, but bashing has become an Olympic Sport for many reasons and not going to be gone into here. Personally use the 9 mm. versions of pistols know days.People vote with their wallets. If a company makes a poor pistol, then the pistol will fall by the wayside. If the company makes many poor firearms, they go out of business real quick. Cheaper to shoot and the 9mm. is still an excellent round for defense with properly chosen ammo. For the .45ACP crowd. They have an excellent round also. Shot placement is still key to ending a shooting scenario. Oh yes. also known as Weregunner.Started out on revolvers and hand to relearn some shooting basics. The semi-auto is a different breed of cat and has many differences from shooting revolvers. By the way, still looking for a Makarov? Definetly a Taurus and Ruger fan. Not a fanatic. ;D :D :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the welcome and sorry to be so short, I was looking for some quick replies as I will most likely be buying it tomorrow. I actually got to handle what could/would/will be my gun today.

I wasn't actually considering any other make or model, I went to the shop that had what I was looking for. I handeled the S&W, Ruger and others just to be sure that the 24/7 was what I wanted. Specifically I handeled the S&W M&P and the Ruger P90 both of which were on sale and popular according to the shop.

The 24/7 fits my hand well. My finger placement is optimal. I have pretty strong medium/large hands and it just felt like this weapon was built especially for me.

I don't really have any specific reason as far as home defense, range, or street carry (funny as I'm in So Cal). I just really always wanted a .45 and will most likely buy a 1911 type in the future. I bought my GP100 on the premise that it was the cowboy gun of the present and the 24/7 seems to me to be the 1911 equivalent.
 

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Ok here goes. There is a www.rugerforum.com that you can do a search for older P90 threads and for the P97 as well as 345.There are plenty of recent posts in the semi-auto a well as gunsmithing section there. Realize that there are rants,raves, and trolls there also. For questions about what to do with a pistol problem you will notice that the pistols are fixed and back in service. Not so for the trolls. Now for devil's advocate time. Why not consider the PT1911 of Taurus? If you are used to single action revolvers, then a single action pistol might make transition to a pistol easier. The down side is that carrying cocked and locked with the hammer back and the safety on means that an accident could happen when or if the safety is accidently wiped off safe.. It happens frequently. No purchase is worth just jumping in if the gun is for sale. Taking time to fit the gun to you is paramount. The store should be able to give you the sale price or a similar one when you have this figured out. It is in their best interests for them to do it. Otherwise they do not need you as a loyal customer. All the pistols that you are considering have very good track records and few major problems. All mechanical tools do wear, need constant maintenance, and have parts break or need replacing from time to time. Recoil springs need replacing every few couple of thousand rounds or more. Depends on how hot the loads you shoot are. There are other springs and parts that need replacing as well over time. Taurus pistols have shown great dureability over 20,000 round torture tests or more. So while I don't have as much experience with 24/7s as you might like and others may not be coming on-line for a while, it might be in your best interests to stand down and wait until more research on your part is done. Experience and knowledge are key to this very important decision. Do what you will and keep us posted on developements as they happen,
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Qwiks Draw thanks for the replies!

I've been researching this gun for well over a year from before they were available. Since none were available I started looking at revolvers and they just seemed to be a better fit for me at that time. I now have two and felt the need (want) to start looking for an auto. Originally I thought I would want a .40, but knowing I would be looking into a 1911 sometime in the future I decided on the .45 (didn't want to have too many different calibers).

Conclusion...I dropped $562 out the door for a NIB 24/7 pro .45 last wednesday, almost $100 in fees (California). I get to pick it up a week from today and have already made arrangements with two buddies to run some rounds through it.

If your interested I'll post some pics and some info on the performance.
 

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Sorry If I sounded jaded, I just thought I would get a little more response.

I will of course post pics and a report. I understand this is a relatively new weapon and most will hold comments due to that fact.

This will be my first auto and I was trying to compare it to my revolvers. I've been looking forward to this gun and wanted to anticipate what the experience would be like. I didn't get the same when I shot full house .357 mags for the first time.

I had some buyers remorse due to other forums and threads reporting .45 mags had a weak spring and feeding issues. I think i'm over that and if this gun is of that vintage I see no problem in sending in the mags to be replaced.

Pick up on the 24th and will more than likely post something that evening or on the 25th.
 

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packrat,
I think one of the reasons you didn't get more responses is because there are a # of 24/7 threads on here already and all the info you asked about has likely been posted (either that or it was just a slow week!) I've read about the mag problems as well and wouldn't worry about it, as if it is a newer gun, you shouldn't have the problem, and if it's old stock, Im sure Taurus will take care of the problem. Enjoy it when you get it, and post a range report when you can.
 

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One last thought. Forget about comparing semi-autos to revolvers. Shooting semi-autos is a whole different breed of cat and technique compared to revolvers. One should not try to take everything learned about revolvers and transfer it over to the semi-autos. The shooting basics maybe, but all else is new. Hand placement, hand grip,body stance, sight picture and a host of other variables are totally changed around for proper use of the pistol. Start using the mind set that this is a one of a kind firearm and take it from there. I had mentors and coaching from people I knew were credible. That helped as much as dry firing did. Both gave me feed back I needed to properly sight and shoot well. Repetition of the shooting basics for pistols ingrained without thinking to much how to whoot well at the range. Just putting bullets down range doesn't equate entirely with getting better with a firearm. It helps.
 

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Wow, I love this gun...after picking up my 24/7 pro .45 yesterday I gave it a good cleaning and bonded with some snap caps. I have to say I dig snap caps, using them I can fully understand the mechanics of a weapon. With the cleaning part I had some issues. Removing the slide take down pin was difficult to say the least. However trying to reassemble and pushing in the same pin was almost impossible. I had to use the rubber handle of some pliers to push the pin back into place, and I have pretty strong hands. Hopefully this will get easier with time.

Quiksdraw, I must say you were dead on about comparing autos to revolvers. Shooting this gun was a completely different experience. After getting used to the recoil I tried to group up my shots. I found that at 15-20 yards I was wishing for a hit. Shooting at half of that distance I was a little more effective. The sites may have been my initial problem, not sure if it was because they are fixed or Heinie, so I stopped using them. I began using what I call "phantom sighting". It's where I will keep both eyes open and see two semi transparent weapons, I place the target in between using both of the frames/slides as a reference. I don't know if there is a technical term for this but it seems to work for me at short distances. I have also talked myself into a range lesson for autos. I now know that revolvers or semi auto rifles can not be compared to auto pistols.

I had zero firing issues after 150 rounds down range. One thing that did happen was I "slapped" in a new magazine and the slide closed and came into battery without me using the slide catch lever. I was a bit more gentle inserting magazines after that, a little scary but no harm done.

Not much of a report, more of an experience.
 

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Pakarat. Happy shooting with your pistol. Just as an aside you have a point about reloading with the magazines. I read my manual for my Ruger pistols and it stated that only a light push was needed tp seat the mag. Instead I listened to others who said a hard push and tap would be needed to make sure the mag "went home" and seated . I bobbled the reloads during competition and lost valuable time in the contest I could not make up for. Had I followed the manual's recommendation to the letter and just using a light push until the mag locked up I would have not had the bobbles take place. Live and learn. I tried the recommendations form the manual afterwards shooting at the range and have never had a problem since. Took quite awhile to get used to the PT111 Mil/pro's characteristics and the way it handled. Know it is second nature. Glad to see your satisfaction and content with your pick. Happy trails.
 
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