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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
New guns + range report.


1.I am a newbie with Taurus but not a newbie to firearms or range shooting.
2. (this should probably be first), I have not been to the range in almost a year. Inexcusable but probably, next to my first year in the Army, the busiest year of my life.
3. The guns right out of the box:
Taurus Poly 605
Taurus Tracker 992
4. Translating the targets (all shots taken at 15'): PLEASE START WITH SECOND TARGET. NO MATTER WHAT I DID, "MANAGE ATTACHMENTS WOULD NOT LET ME PUT THE FIRST ONE ON THE LEFT.
a. Middle target is the 992 .22LR -
b. Upper left is the 605 in 38.
c. Upper right is 992 .22MAG (WMR)
Now, range rules had me flip the target upside down so as not to graze the floor (the range is 75 feet long.
d. Upper left is my Sig 232 in .380 (the grouping in upper-middle-left was using MagSafe Personal Defense. Much more powerful than I remembered. The rest were range ammo.
e. Upper right is .22LR again.
Basic Review of 992 and 605:


The 992 in .22LR - I'm certainly rusty but I was more than pleased with the action and it was a dream to shoot. The all-metal heavy frame made it feel like a pea shooter. Where you aimed is where you hit. A big +1
The 992 in .22MAG. There certainly is a difference in firepower with a jump in the barrel followed by a flame! Took some getting used to after the .22LR. My biggest disappointment was that the cylinder locked/jambed consistently. Like every other round. I tried some quick maintenance but no luck. What I thought I noticed is that the cartridges drifted a little and maybe the rim of the cartridge was catching. Will work on it tomorrow, check the forum, etc. I have a bad feeling it will have to go back to Taurus. Two cylinders, one pistol might be asking too much. I would rate the .22LR a solid "A". I will hold on the .22MAG until I determine what the problem is.


The 605 Poly Protector - This is an uber-light pistol and that's just the way I want it. I bought this for just one purpose - hiking and backpacking. It's my Plan B for 2 and 4 legged critters who have bad plans for me and the fam. I could not find one box of fmj .357 in my town. Not one box! So I went with .38. Quite frankly, it was no pleasure to shoot the .38 ammo as it really kicked. I can only imagine what the .357 would do! My first shot out of the barrel was a total miss. Remember, it's only 15 feet! I even took my binoculars out cause I knew that had to be wrong. Remember, upper left on first pic. The second missed as well. "What the bleep!?" Long story short, I had to literally aim down and right, off the target to put them where you know see them. The sights are fixed so there is no adjusting them. Yes, it's been a year since range time and, yes, it's a very light pistol. You can also see, generally, I am pulling upper left. I believe that means I am "pushing" the shot, anticipating it. More work on the range. Having said that and recognizing the fixed sights, this is a "point and shoot" pistol, for up front and personal threats. My advice to me is more range time to work on my push but to also realize that center mass is always going to mean a little down/right with the 605. I would rate this pistol a C+ to B
 

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Two cylinders, one pistol might be asking too much.
The first pistol I bought when I turned 21 was a Ruger Super Single Six. It was also 22 lr/22 mag and came with two cylinders. Never had a problem with either one, although poi is going to change with the higher velocity magnums. Point is, you're not asking too much. It's doable, but might require a vacation to Miami. Or they might just swap out the cylinders through the mail. I had them replace a barrel on my PT145 that way, and it beat the dickens out of shipping a complete firearm. You can send a cylinder or a barrel through the U.S. Mail, but not a fully assembled firearm and probably not a receiver either. I'd call CS and see what kind of options they give you.

On the short light 38 - short barreled guns are more challenging to shoot for a couple reasons. First you've got a very short sight radius, so any misalignment of the sights is going to be amplified. Trigger control becomes much more important, and for the same reason. The other thing that happens is a snappier recoil due to the jet effect of the unburned powder after the projectile leaves the barrel. It's just like letting go of a balloon that's full of air - when the bullet leaves the barrel there's instantly a low pressure zone created at the muzzle, and a high pressure area at the breech and it pushes the weapon back. Since a handgun's barrel is rarely in line with the axis of the bore, it winds up going up and back. Then you add to that the additional flash and noise you get with a short barrel, and anticipating the recoil becomes a more common problem.

I'd spend some time dry firing it and find the sweet spot in the trigger. Find the pull technique that allows you to drop the hammer with no sight bounce, do at least 25 repetitions to cement the muscle memory, and head back out to the range. If recoil was an issue on your first trip, you might take a couple snap caps along with you and an 'assistant' to load your mags. Have them throw a couple snap caps in randomly. You'll know instantly when the hammer lands on the 'duds' if you're anticipating or not.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The first pistol I bought when I turned 21 was a Ruger Super Single Six. It was also 22 lr/22 mag and came with two cylinders. Never had a problem with either one, although poi is going to change with the higher velocity magnums. Point is, you're not asking too much. It's doable, but might require a vacation to Miami. Or they might just swap out the cylinders through the mail. I had them replace a barrel on my PT145 that way, and it beat the dickens out of shipping a complete firearm. You can send a cylinder or a barrel through the U.S. Mail, but not a fully assembled firearm and probably not a receiver either. I'd call CS and see what kind of options they give you.

On the short light 38 - short barreled guns are more challenging to shoot for a couple reasons. First you've got a very short sight radius, so any misalignment of the sights is going to be amplified. Trigger control becomes much more important, and for the same reason. The other thing that happens is a snappier recoil due to the jet effect of the unburned powder after the projectile leaves the barrel. It's just like letting go of a balloon that's full of air - when the bullet leaves the barrel there's instantly a low pressure zone created at the muzzle, and a high pressure area at the breech and it pushes the weapon back. Since a handgun's barrel is rarely in line with the axis of the bore, it winds up going up and back. Then you add to that the additional flash and noise you get with a short barrel, and anticipating the recoil becomes a more common problem.

I'd spend some time dry firing it and find the sweet spot in the trigger. Find the pull technique that allows you to drop the hammer with no sight bounce, do at least 25 repetitions to cement the muscle memory, and head back out to the range. If recoil was an issue on your first trip, you might take a couple snap caps along with you and an 'assistant' to load your mags. Have them throw a couple snap caps in randomly. You'll know instantly when the hammer lands on the 'duds' if you're anticipating or not.
Wow! That was just plain excellent! Thanks, Mr. D!
 

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I bought the Buffalo Bore 38+P Outdoorsman to use as ammunition for my Poly when I'm hunting, and for the same reasons. It's a very light gun. The Outdoorsman contains a hard cast Keith bullet for greater penatration if I have to use it on a hog. Don't make me their salesman. Do some research. You'll find that the bullet was designed to be used in lightweight guns, but has other advantages, low recoil, less chance of bullet jump.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
I bought the Buffalo Bore 38+P Outdoorsman to use as ammunition for my Poly when I'm hunting, and for the same reasons. It's a very light gun. The Outdoorsman contains a hard cast Keith bullet for greater penatration if I have to use it on a hog. Don't make me their salesman. Do some research. You'll find that the bullet was designed to be used in lightweight guns, but has other advantages, low recoil, less chance of bullet jump.
Thanks for the heads up and I will do some research. Just found a box of fmf .357 so will give that a try as well though not exactly looking forward to it.
 

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Definetly keep working on that trigger pull, I too just bought a Pro Poly and found myself being pretty innacurate with it as well. However after a couple of time having it out I have been able to bring those groups in substantially. Had some mixed feeling about it at first, but after I broke myself in to the pistol I would have to give it an A.
 

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A couple of ideas before you send it back to Taurus.
1) shoot it from rest If you haven't already.
2) have someone or two or three other experienced shooters put a few down range with it.
3) give it a chance to break in and repeat 1/2 if necessary.
 

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I didn't have any accuracy problems with my 605 new out of the box though. It was not poly though, so?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Definetly keep working on that trigger pull, I too just bought a Pro Poly and found myself being pretty innacurate with it as well. However after a couple of time having it out I have been able to bring those groups in substantially. Had some mixed feeling about it at first, but after I broke myself in to the pistol I would have to give it an A.
That's really encouraging. Range is closed today but will go out tomorrow after work. Was a bit embarrassed in using that range for the first time, range master directly behind me to check me out, and the very first two shots don't hit the target. Oh, boy.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Just a postscript: Next time out with my Taurus's - Right or wrong, I just adjusted my 605 stance by shooting down and right on the target. Nice center grouping!
992 - For whatever reason, the WMR cylinder worked every time. Must have heard that I was going to send it back. I really like the 992. It's so heavy it makes shooting the LR's a breeze and should be a good entry pistol for the newbie.
 
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