Taurus Firearm Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,830 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I found a Mossberg 190 16 gauge bolt-action shotgun in need of rescue at my LGS this morning. I don't have any pictures yet, but imagine one of these



liberally coated (except for the bolt) in desert tan spray paint, applied with total abandon by Bubba's cousin "Rattlecan" Rembrandt. Front to back, top to bottom, side to side. Even the Mossberg C-Lect choke, which should look like this



is completely painted. The only part ol' "Rattlecan" didn't get is the bolt, and that's prob'ly 'cause cousin Bubba showed him how to remove it. (Pics of the current sorry state of affairs to be posted in a future thread.)

I want to restore the old shotgun, so this will be my football season firearm project.

My question: What methods would you use to remove paint from the steel parts and the wood furniture? I don't know the condition of the bluing on the steel parts, and I don't want to use a paint stripper or remover that might affect it. Also, I don't want to damage the wood itself, just remove the paint and old varnish or whatever it had, then clean and restore it.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
22,322 Posts
Well, the alternatives are chemicals like paint stripper, or mechanical means, like abrasives or ultrasound. You could try an ultrasonic cleaner on some of the small parts, but that isn't going to help with the barrel or stock. Did the store gunsmith have any suggestions?

Personally, I'd be thinking chemical strippers on the metal, and abrasives on the wood. There's a lot of refinishing ahead of you - which is cool.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
You could try brake fluid on the metal parts. I've used it before to get paint off of metal car parts. I don't think it would affect the bluing because it an oxidized layer not made of some kind of polymer like the paint is. The wood i would say lightly sand with 600 or higher

Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,541 Posts
Toluene will work on the metal parts with out effecting the blueing. Phosphoric acid on the metal parts that may be rusted. I would a use wood finish chemical stripper on the furniture, then sand as necessary. I have the same gun in 20 gauge. It's in parts and pieces & someone cut the barrel down to 18.5". I was lucky enough to find 2 additional 3 round and 1, 5 round mags for mine. I am missing a couple of parts for mine, the recoil plate and bolt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,810 Posts
There is a product called Purple Power I used to use to strip paint from model cars, it is a liquid that would dissolve the paint leaving it in a powdery state that You could brush off in soapy water without harming the plastic.
I used to get it in the automotive department at Wally World, last time I checked they still carried it comes in a gallon purple bottle.
It might work on the metal parts, the wood furniture I would just use regular paint stripper and just plan on refinishing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,339 Posts
I work in a place that repairs electric motors for a variety of customers. So many maintenance guys are Rattlecan Rembrandts aand paint over the nameplates. I frequently need the info on them to order parts or quote repairs. I actually use duct tape or regular masking tape as it will pull the spray paint but not the info underneath.
That may help minimize the chemical or abrasive cleaning for larger areas.
You could try that, then depending on how it works move to chemical or abrasive.
You can also get a small gravity fed sand blast gun at Harbor Freight that may help.
 

·
Supporting Moderator
Joined
·
5,350 Posts
To pull off the paint use Graffiti Remover that can be bought at an Ace Hardware store.................
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,703 Posts
I've read about using vinegar:

https://www.hunker.com/12610281/recipe-for-using-vinegar-for-dried-paint-removal

If you can disassemble it and have a container large enough to submerge it - use a large pot to heat the vinegar since you'll probably need a couple of gallons...and instead of a paint scraper, I'd use one of those teflon safe scrub sponges. I've used this method on some items but not firearms...yet :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: jwc007

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
On the metal parts use vinegar and if in a hurry add a little salt.

Use a tooth brush to remove stubborn spots and be sure to neutralize with baking soda solution after vinegar.

Always good to do in well ventilated area. I use this method on rusted tools.

Keep an eye on it and start with the small stuff to get a feel for the process.

Ray
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,819 Posts
The advantage to Bubba's rattlecan paint and bodyshop method is that removal is generally pretty easy. use a chemical stripper on the metal and wood parts. The Mossberg 16's have a tendency to have the stocks dry out and crack. I would refinish with either linseed oil or Tru-oil to add some moisture back to the stock. I have an affinity for the Mossberg 16 GA Bolt gun as that was the first gun I ever negligently discharged when I was young and it worked perfectly as I was showing my younger brother the reason why you always practice firearm safety. Why being pointed in a safe direction was clearly demonstrated... Poor bucket didn't stand a chance. The same shotgun is on my wishlist along with an H&R 20 ga single and a Rem 1100. Those were the shotguns of my youth shooting with my dad. Please take pictures to show the progress in restoration. I would mean a lot to me.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,748 Posts
Very nice T&C! Old bolt action shotguns are almost a lost art unto themselves.

The second from the top is my “youth” bolt action 410 shotgun I got around age 13 to shoot old squirrel nests with. Not sure I actually ever got a squirrel. It has a detachable 5 round box magazine. Extra credit if you can guess the brand and the make and caliber of the other long guns with it. Hint: I’ve talked at length about all of them here at TA.net at some point or another.

0B2C1082-FCFB-439E-8F5A-11722B875E9A.jpeg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,819 Posts
Very nice T&C! Old bolt action shotguns are almost a lost art unto themselves.

The second from the top is my “youth” bolt action 410 shotgun I got around age 13 to shoot old squirrel nests with. Not sure I actually ever got a squirrel. It has a detachable 5 round box magazine. Extra credit if you can guess the brand and the make and caliber of the other long guns with it. Hint: I’ve talked at length about all of them here at TA.net at some point or another.

View attachment 445667
Top looks like a Browning A5, 3rd looks like a Marlin lever and I'm guessing the bottom is either a Mossberg lever or a Rossi lever.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,748 Posts
Top looks like a Browning A5, 3rd looks like a Marlin lever and I'm guessing the bottom is either a Mossberg lever or a Rossi lever.
Top: Browning A5 12G
2nd: savage model 18c 410G in 2[SUP]3[/SUP]/[SUB]4[/SUB]“ and 3”
3rd: Marlin 1894c 44MAG
4th: Ithaca model M49 22 cal single shot
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
My first firearm was a Mossberg bolt action in 20 gauge and a choke just like that. I was 10 years old and it was not a youth size. I did learn to hit quail fairly often with it. As I got older, 14-16, my Dad started to complain the I shot too fast for him(getting older) to even get a shot.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top