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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been wanting a scoped bolt action rifle for a while. That's about how specific the urge was, apart from "probably at least .30 bore, I suppose." Yeah, I wasn't overthinking this. Well, a day or two my boss mentioned having a .300 Win Mag he didn't need/want/have any significant attachment to. The thing was, he wanted many dollars for it. One hundred of them! I pretty much said "I'll take it." when he brought it up.

It turned out to be a Remington Model 30 Express. They were made from 1926 to 1940, so at the latest it predates our entry into WWII. I can't figure out exactly when it was made; more on that later. It's marked "300 WIN" on the barrel. I like the stock. Nice looking, and fits me pretty well. I doubt it's original. So what? The scope is interesting; the front of the scope ends behind the front ring mount, so there's sort of a bridge that arcs back to reach the scope.

Anyway, on to some pictures.




Why does the barrel say Springfield back here by the action


and Remington further down toward the muzzle?


Interesting how something under Springfield has been marked out, too. Everything I see about dating Remingtons talks about barrel markings, but I wonder if this has been rebarreled.

There are some interesting proof marks on the other side of the chamber end of the barrel. Should have gotten a picture of those.

The scope is marked "The Texan." I like that, because my boss is from Texas. I wonder if there used to be caps over the adjusters?



So that's it. I like it. Can't wait to see how it shoots. Seems like a good use of $100.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Okay, I think I figured out the Springfield marking. I bet it was originally a Springfield 30-06. Hmm, in that case it may have just been rechambered, not rebarreled. All ye more knowledgeable in the ways of rifles, does that sound correct and more importantly, safe? I'm told this rifle has taken it's share of elk over the years.
 
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$100?!?! You thief, you! What a bargain! When we meet for a range trip this fall, you bring that with you, hear?

Psst . . . what else does your boss wanna get rid of?
 
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Awesome score... might want to update the optic's to century 2000.:cool:
 
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Did you have to wear a mask?

I only ask because you stole it. The sling alone, if it's as high a quality as it appears to be, would cost you half what you have in the gun whole gun to replace with a new one.

By the way, I agree with the rechamber theory. Striking over the original chambering and then putting the new chambering above or below is the normal way to mark a rechambered gun.

That's a classic hunting rig if I've ever seen one. Military style sling, old school scope and mounts, civilian Pattern 14/17 action rifle, ... Heck, even the recoil pad looks old school.

I've got a feeling that the porting was done a LONG time after the rifle was first used. Leave the ports off of it and I can see that rifle in black and white hunting pics out West from pre-war or the late '40's and early '50's.
 

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From what I see the scope is worth what you paid. They were made in Tyler Texas from what I'm reading. I also agree with the rechambering theory and the you stole it theory. Great catch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Leave the ports off of it and I can see that rifle in black and white hunting pics out West from pre-war or the late '40's and early '50's.
And that, friends and neighbors, is why I won't be changing a darn thing about this rifle. I'm leaving it alone for the same reason I wouldn't put a laser grip on my Colt 1908 (if anyone made laser grips for it). The age is a big part of the charm.

Regarding the price, I offered more than once to pay more than $100. He turned me down with zero hesitation. I almost wonder if he/he and his wife weren't too fond of the family member who took several elk with it, so they just wanted it out of the house. Works for me, rather ironically, because of the high regard in which I hold him.
 

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Yeah ditto what everyone said. You stole that rifle! Congratulations! It's a simply beautiful piece. I'd be proud to have it in my collection. Only disagreement with the above is that if the scope meets your needs (which appear to be non-specific, lol) and does the job definitely keep it on there. That rifle deserves period correct optics on it. Anything new would spoil it's character. Yes the caps are missing. I'll bet there some modern caps that would fit it if you could test a few out or find out the diameter and threading. Good luck you lucky dog!
 

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I agree on two points, first that it was rechambered at some point and second that you stole it. That scope is interesting, but the mount is really something else. I've never seen one like it before and I look at a lot of old rifles every week. The only thing I would consider changing would be the recoil pad if you plan to shoot it. I imagine its rock hard by now. You can always put it back on to retain the originality of the rifle as long as you don't alter the stock. The .300 Win Mag didn't appear until 1963, so it was probably rechambered in the 60s or 70s. It might be hard to tell by now, but does it appear as if there were also changes made to the blind magazine or bolt to accommodate the .300 Win Mag? BTW, the scopes were made between 1953 and 1958 and it did have caps on the adjusters at one time. Also is it possible the scope mount is a Miller Kodiak mount? I believe they were made in the 50s which would place it about the same time as the scope.

 

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Man, that's a seriously good-lookin' bolt rifle that you've stolen... err... purchased. Somehow, for reasons unknown, I'm not familiar with the M30. Most of my old bolt rifle attention has been focused on the Winchester M54 & M70. Your M30 has me itching to do a little investigatin'.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The scope mount says "M L Stith" and "Pat apld for". Apparently Stith mouths were made in San Antonio in the 50s and required no drilling or tapping; they used the existing screw holes. So the scope and mounts were probably added in the 50s. The serial number makes me think the gun was from the late 30s, but that's just a wild guess.



Here's the very unusual front mount arrangement.


Three screws go through the long horizontal bar and up into the bottom of the scope tube. They just barely protrude through the tube.

Here's an internet grab showing a very similar setup on a Winchester:


Here are all those great proofmarks on the barrel.


And I get why you'd expect the recoil pad to be rock hard, but it feels good. I can depress it with my thumb, but it takes a bit of effort.

Doctordeere, I'm nobody's bolt gun expert, that's for sure. I hadn't heard of this either, but boy, am I glad he mentioned it and I hopped on it!
 

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The Remington M 30 series of rifles were buit from left over P17 receivers and parts from WW1. P17 actions are noted for their strength, so much so that some African big game rifles were built on these actions. You did well, really well

Since there is no sight at the end of the barrel, I would guess that someone took a new 30-06 barrel, rechambered it to 300 Win and installed it on you rifle. Then installed the scope.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Okay, another picture will shed some light on the sight question. Looks to me like the factory front sight was removed when the muzzle brake was installed.


Given the fact that this is the only non-period feature, I wonder if I should have the brake removed.
 

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Other reasons I believe the barrel has been replaced is that Remington manufactured these barrels and I doubt that Remington would send out their doors a Remington rifle with a barrel marked Springfield. Most P-19 and Remington 30 I have seen had the interior of the barrel pitted and just nasty. After WW1 and WW2 there was lots of cheap surplus ammo that was corrosive. That's what the owners of 30-06 rifles mostly shot and after 40-50 years the barrels showed it.

Now if it was in the mid 60's and I wanted the rifle in the new hot cartage of 300 Mag, how would I do it. I'd take good actioned Rem. 30 express which had a questionable barrel and get a new surplus 30-36 barre, rechamber it and mount it on the action.
 

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Yup, the barrel would have been marked Springfield 30-06. Over the years the Springfield has been dropped and most just call it the 30-06 today.

Still a nice gun!

Maloy

The Remington M 30 series of rifles were buit from left over P17 receivers and parts from WW1. P17 actions are noted for their strength, so much so that some African big game rifles were built on these actions. You did well, really well

Since there is no sight at the end of the barrel, I would guess that someone took a new 30-06 barrel, rechambered it to 300 Win and installed it on you rifle. Then installed the scope.
 

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Other reasons I believe the barrel has been replaced is that Remington manufactured these barrels and I doubt that Remington would send out their doors a Remington rifle with a barrel marked Springfield. Most P-19 and Remington 30 I have seen had the interior of the barrel pitted and just nasty. After WW1 and WW2 there was lots of cheap surplus ammo that was corrosive. That's what the owners of 30-06 rifles mostly shot and after 40-50 years the barrels showed it.

Now if it was in the mid 60's and I wanted the rifle in the new hot cartage of 300 Mag, how would I do it. I'd take good actioned Rem. 30 express which had a questionable barrel and get a new surplus 30-36 barre, rechamber it and mount it on the action.

Beat me to it. You can tell it's a 1917 Enfield from the bolt shape. Yes, I said Enfield. Made at Winchester and Remington in 303 British starting in 1914, and then switching to 30-06 in 1917.
 

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The rear scope mount is where the sights were located on the P14/17's.

I bet the rear mount makes full use of the dovetails and other mounting points for the rear sight. Beats the side mount that you have to do on most of its' military rifle contemporaries.

I wonder if the location of the front mounting bracket has something to do with the barrel taper. It looks rather abrupt when moving from the chamber towards the muzzle. Not something that you really want moving forward, after all.
 
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All I can say is "Wow". You got one hell of a deal there OP! If it's manufacture was pre-WWII, then yes it was rechambered to .300 WinMag, at least later than the early 60's. What a killer deal you got on that one. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Other reasons I believe the barrel has been replaced is that Remington manufactured these barrels and I doubt that Remington would send out their doors a Remington rifle with a barrel marked Springfield.
In the first post, 4th picture, you see the full Remington markings on the top of the barrel. Springfield appears back where the caliber is marked.

As for whether it's a sporterized 1917 or a commercial manufacture rifle that never saw military service, my research leads me to believe that it being marked "Model 30 Express" means it was commercial manufacture. Yes, the design is lightly modified 1917, but given the serial number, I'd say this was produced in 1939 give or take a year, and military manufacture of the 1917 ended years earlier. Also, I don't believe military manufacture model 1917s had "Remington" spelled out. Manufacturer of the actual 1917s was indicated by a single letter code.
 
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I think the 'Springfield' came to be there because the proper designation of the round it was originally chambered for is .30-'06 Springfield.

It's odd that Remington in the '30's would have used the full proper designation like that. A lot of companies just refused to do it. It's kinda like how .38 Special is technically '.38 Smith and Wesson Special' but you won't see the Smith and Wesson part on Colts and the .44-40 is actually .44Winchester Center Fire (.44WCF) but you won't find that designation used other than on Winchester guns (Merwin and Hulbert even went so far as to come up with a .44M&H that was basically identical and completely interchangeable with the .44WCF for just that reason).

Whomever did the rechambering marked out the .30-'06 part and didn't bother defacing the Springfield. By the early '60's when the .300WM came out, that was probably the most important part to deface even if the job was left incomplete.

The marking of the receiver as a Model 30 Express tells me that it's a civilian gun. The P-17's I've handled had the standard military markings on the receiver ring.
 
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