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I bought a 50/50 mix of once fired brass, all Remington but half of them were silver in color. I did a little online searching and assume there nickel plated. $10 for 110 pieces. I did not have any 357 brass at all so I said why not. There seems to be some controversy over reloading nickel plated, hard on dies, cracks easy and so on. But when you look for them to buy online "sold out" so people must use the plated brass. After a trip through the tumbler they sure are pretty, lol. So I loaded some up with the load data from the Richard Lee reloading book. Max load is 8.4gn Long shot so I went with 8.3gn and XTP 158gn. I will shoot a few and save the rest for deer season if they do ok and not reload them after that for fear of cracks ect. Only one thing bothers me about them is the primers on some went in easier then others or the brass I have been reloading. I would appreciate some feed back from you folks that have used them. Hopefully without the OMG your gona blow your self up scare. Sorry about the lengthy post and looking forward to hearing from you folks. Thanks;)
 

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Maybe someone else can speak to some significant difference between 'regular' and nickled brass, but FWIW, I've been loading nickle plated brass alongside regular brass for quite a while, haven't noticed any difference between the two other than nickled is prettier. Shiny. Mmm.

I tend to pull the nickle cases out as I'm reloading, and keep them all together in a batch (mixed headstamp), just for the appearance.
 

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I've loaded a lot of nickel brass in both .38 spl and .357. It's true that much of the .357 brass these days is nickel plated so it's difficult to avoid. I've read much the same comments about it, but I can't vouch for that from my experience. I've had to toss an insignificant number because the plating was flaking. I've reloaded some so many times the nickel is 80% worn off with no apparent problems. If I had a choice I'd go with plain brass, but I wouldn't pay extra to get either.
 

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Just like my other pistol brass, I would toss them based upon number of loads. I just look at them all critically and recycle them when they show cracks.
 
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Only reason ammo companies plated the brass is to prevent tarnish and corrosion when stored in gun belts. I have reloaded .38, .357 and .45acp nickel brass many times with no issues.
 

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I have some .357 nickel plated that I reloaded multiple times over the last thirty years without any problems. Occasionally one will split at the case mouth then I will just put it in the case trimmer and cut it back and make a .38 special out of it. Heavy crimps wear out your brass! Use a light crimp or none if you can and your brass will last a very long time. If you are using standard reloading dies a little lube will will help keep those plated cases from scratching the inside of your sizing die too....
 
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Yep I am on the wagon with threat them just like brass cases!
The only thing that i do is that i kind of hoard the nickle cases to reload my self defense ammo with them, simply because they (the SD ammo) will last longer than my brass cased target ammo.
I don't want no stinkin corroded cases on my sd ammo!
plus them nice big old hollow point gold dots look better color coordinated with the nickle cases!
the silver in the hollow point cavity just seems to hi-light the nickle cases!
after all we must be considerate of what we shoot a bad guy with!
 

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Nickel doesnt corrode as easily as brass, if you are using carbide dies nickel isn't going to hurt them. I would probably drop the charge more than 1/10th of a grain below max on the first loading, load a couple and work up.
 

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Caution on the idea of a "too" light or no crimp however. Recoil could cause bullet "setback" and change the pressures in your loads. Also in a tubular magazine like a lever gun setback can occur if the crimp isn't enough.

It's like Goldielocks....too tight..too loose...just right.
 

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Yep I am on the wagon with threat them just like brass cases!
The only thing that i do is that i kind of hoard the nickle cases to reload my self defense ammo with them, simply because they (the SD ammo) will last longer than my brass cased target ammo.
I don't want no stinkin corroded cases on my sd ammo!
plus them nice big old hollow point gold dots look better color coordinated with the nickle cases!
the silver in the hollow point cavity just seems to hi-light the nickle cases!
after all we must be considerate of what we shoot a bad guy with!
Besides they look so nice standing six in a row in the black blt buckle the wife bought me many moons ago. :)
 

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I'm tinkering around with nickle brass. I'm using the Lee Loader and I've found so far that my nickle seems to enjoy the process of reloading a tad bit more than the brass. I haven't fired any yet, but the nickle brass looks sexy as hell with a lead bullet in it lol.
I thought the nickle would plating would be a good identifier if I want to load with some hot H110 and use brass for the lighter loads. IDK just crossed my mind. And, I like the idea of it not corroding while stored underground.
 

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I bought a 50/50 mix of once fired brass, all Remington but half of them were silver in color. I did a little online searching and assume there nickel plated. $10 for 110 pieces. I did not have any 357 brass at all so I said why not. There seems to be some controversy over reloading nickel plated, hard on dies, cracks easy and so on. But when you look for them to buy online "sold out" so people must use the plated brass. After a trip through the tumbler they sure are pretty, lol. So I loaded some up with the load data from the Richard Lee reloading book. Max load is 8.4gn Long shot so I went with 8.3gn and XTP 158gn. I will shoot a few and save the rest for deer season if they do ok and not reload them after that for fear of cracks ect. Only one thing bothers me about them is the primers on some went in easier then others or the brass I have been reloading. I would appreciate some feed back from you folks that have used them. Hopefully without the OMG your gona blow your self up scare. Sorry about the lengthy post and looking forward to hearing from you folks. Thanks;)
Just don't ever over flare your case mouths, and don't put a really heavy roll crimp in your case mouths except for real MAX loads. And you cannot just smooth the case mouth back to straight because you want to save your brass for a few more firings. They really need a moderate crimp.

It's not nickel actually.... (I know~ I am nit-picking) but rather cadmium plating. Just sort of a Jeapardy trivia answer.... :)

I have loaded, fired, tumbled, and reloaded cadmium plated cases until they are an overall soft gold color with no problems.

The only way any case is ever going to scratch your die set is if you tumble your brass in some weirdo hippie-beachcomber-sand and leave some really abrasive schmootz behind on the surface of your cases. The brass or plated brass you do in walnut or corncob won't affect your die set whatsoever!!!!
 

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I've loaded mostly plated 357 cases for many years and prefer them... as others have said, don't over bell or over crimp... then reload them til the mouths split or the primers won't stay in and then toss into the recycle bin!
 

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I have some .357 nickel plated that I reloaded multiple times over the last thirty years without any problems. Occasionally one will split at the case mouth then I will just put it in the case trimmer and cut it back and make a .38 special out of it. Heavy crimps wear out your brass! Use a light crimp or none if you can and your brass will last a very long time. If you are using standard reloading dies a little lube will will help keep those plated cases from scratching the inside of your sizing die too....

To follow up on this, when I mentioned using "no crimp" this would only be appropriate when using light loads in a revolver such as HBWC's
 

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Everyone else answered your question about the nickle so I'll answer the one about primer seating. Several factors can effect how hard primers seat.
1. Nickle thickness is not always consistent from case to case.
2. Primer pockets are not always consistent from manufacturer to manufacturer and even case lot to case lot.
3. Primers are not always the exact same size from lot to lot.
4. Cases loaded to max pressures can have primer pockets become loose.

I loaded about 1000 of Remington Nickle Cases in 38 and 357 recently using CCI and Remington Primers. I noticed some of both primer brands seated hard in a lot of the cases. As long as they don't deform and they seat fully into the pocket I don't worry about it.
 

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Yeah - the Nickle plated brass is nothing to worry about. I view it (as others mentioned) as a premium case - less variation in the case color/corrosion. I've reloaded plenty of them multiple time in 9mm and 40 S&W (high pressure rounds) with nothing out of the ordinary at all. .452dia hit the nail on the head with primer pockets as well. I hand clean pockets and hand prime - the difference can be quite noticeable but, again - not an issue to date. AND FWIW I have the same primer pocket feel with 223/5.56 rifle rounds some with crimps removed (5.56 military rounds) - others not. No primer pocket issues to date. Some do go in easier than others...
 

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He-He-He, If you have OCD and want to sit up all night sleepless now that the Nickle (cadium) question is out of the way take a look at the primer pocket flash holes!!
 

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I like the plated cases for their looks when they are tumbled. They don't seem to act any different than brass.
 

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Nickel plated brass looks great but over the course of multiple reloads, it is more likely to develop small splits around the case mouth. Nickle plated brass generally is more britle than brass which does not have the extra plating. Still it is very useable and the splits are easily noted when loading.

regards,
 

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I like the plated brass. It only takes about 30 minutes of tumbling and they're clean as new. I don't go light on the crimp on anything I reload. I crimp the heck out of them. Brass is not that expensive especially .38/.357 brass. I just don't want a bullet backing out on me. My S&W 340PD .357 Mag. snubby that just weighs 11.4 ounces empty jammed one time when a bullet backed out with factory ammo that wasn't crimped hard enough. That's the reason I carry my reloads in my guns because the bullets are not going to back out at the worse time should I need to fend for my life.
 
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