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SOURCE:
Bill Introduced to Prevent State Department from Blocking C&R Imports Korean M1s Still in Limbo, New Bill Introduced to Prevent State Department from Blocking Imports 6/11/13 | by Max Slowik



Wyoming Rep. Cynthia Lummis (R) is hard at work to reverse the decision made to block the re-importation of thousands of U.S.-made M1 Garands and M1 Carbines that were given to the South Korean military during the war and have since been taken out of service.


The Obama administration had originally green-lit the move to bring these collectible, American-made guns back home, then quickly turned around on their position, preventing their import in 2010.


Although Lummis has in the past fought to get some of these firearms into private hands, complications between the American importers, the South Korean ministry of defense and the administration have held back the importation of these guns.


The Star-Tribune reported that “Because the guns were given to South Korea during the war, State Department permission is required, according to ATF guidelines.”


But others suggest the reasons are more sinister than simply bureaucracy. “There is a fear of average people owning guns,” said Erich Pratt, director of communications for Gun Owners of America. “The administration has been in many ways trying to slice and dice our rights from us. This was another attempt at doing so.”


In June of last year Lummis and Sen. Jon Tester (D-Mont.) passed legislation that would prevent the Department of State from interfering with the transfer of 87,000 of the Korean guns. This new bill — the “Collectible Firearms Protection Act” — goes much further than that, preventing the Department of State from interfering with the re-importation of any of these military surplus firearms, so long as they are American-made “curios and relics.”


South Korea has some 800,000 M1 Garands and Carbines, mostly Garands.

“The import restriction is the result of a complex set of federal laws. In 1984, Congress enacted legislation that allows the importation of military surplus “curio or relic” firearms. The provision was later found to only cover firearms of foreign origin because another law, the Arms Export Control Act, prohibits the importation of arms that were originally manufactured in the United States and furnished to a foreign government,” the NRA-ILA explained.

“In 1988, Congress amended the Arms Export Control Act to specifically allow for the importation of U.S.-origin ‘curio or relic firearms,’ but various administrations have used certain requirements under that law to continue to block those imports.”


Lummis introduced H.R. 2247 this week, which would prevent the State Department from interfering with the importation of any “curio and relic” firearms that were made in the U.S., including all of the South Korean military surplus rifles and carbines.


These guns would then be sold as any other firearms, through regular firearm importers and through FFLs to individuals who submit to a background check.



Wyoming Rep. Cynthia Lummis (R)



“It’s disappointing that legislation is even necessary to allow U.S. citizens to access perfectly legal and regulated firearms, in this case storied, U.S.-made rifles that are pieces of U.S. military history,” Lummis said in a press release.

“This is a political stunt on the part of the State Department, pure and simple, while denying the exercise of Second Amendment rights by law-abiding citizens, firearm collectors, and competitive marksman. The State Department has no business blocking domestic firearm ownership; they are way out of bounds and my legislation will put them back in their place,” she continued.


These M1 Garands and Carbines are not functionally different than any currently in production in the U.S., and are just as legal to own. Hopefully this bill will finally be what it takes to get these guns out of mothballs and into the hands of shooters and collectors.


Previously the Obama administration blocked these guns from being re-imported because they could be used to commit crimes.
 

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FOLLOW UP ARTICLE:
Lummis wants M1 rifles to get import OK

Lummis wants M1 rifles to get import OK

June 06, 2013 8:00 am • By KYLE ROERINK Star-Tribune staff writer



The U.S. State Department has barred South Korea from selling nearly 1 million antique guns to eager U.S. collectors and enthusiasts.

Rep. Cynthia Lummis, R-Wyo., wants to change that.


On Tuesday she introduced a bill in Congress that would lift a nearly three-year ban imposed by the Obama administration that blocked imports of M1 rifles made in the U.S. and shipped overseas during the Korean War.


The guns, once standard issue for U.S. soldiers, would arrive back in the U.S. and be sold to civilian marksmanship programs that would then distribute them to individual buyers.


Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms rules usually allow guns older than 50 years to be imported into the country. But because the guns were given to South Korea during the war, State Department permission is required, according to ATF guidelines.


“It’s disappointing that legislation is even necessary to allow U.S. citizens to access perfectly legal and regulated firearms, in this case storied, U.S.-made rifles that are pieces of U.S. military history,” Lummis said in a press release on Wednesday. “This is a political stunt on the part of the State Department, pure and simple, while denying the exercise of Second Amendment rights by law-abiding citizens, firearm collectors, and competitive marksman. The State Department has no business blocking domestic firearm ownership; they are way out of bounds and my legislation will put them back in their place.”


The State Department didn’t respond to Star-Tribune requests for comment.


The stockpile is sought after by gun enthusiasts and veterans across the country. The weapons are used for marksmanship competitions and military ceremonies.


This isn’t the first time South Korea’s offered to sell the guns. The Reagan Administration allowed 200,000 M1 rifles from South Korea to be sold in the U.S. in 1987. In 2010, South Korea offered to sell back 87,310 M1 “Garand” rifles and 770,160 M1 carbines. The State Department initially gave the OK to South Korea, but then reversed its decision.


Lummis sponsored similar legislation in 2010 with Sen. John Tester, D-Mont. The State Department publicly stated it wouldn’t lift the ban because it said the guns could be used for “illicit purposes.”


For Lummis and Tester that wasn’t enough.


The two wrote the department a letter to demand a better explanation. There were worries from the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms, the White House and the Justice Department that the M1 carbine could be “converted into a fully automatic rifle,” according to a letter sent to Lummis from the State Department two years ago.


The Lummis and Tester legislation failed. The State Department hinted it would have let the M1 Garands enter the country in late 2011, but the deal never panned out.


Gun-rights advocates claim the ban is just one more push by the federal government to impede the Second Amendment.

“There is a fear of average people owning guns,” said Erich Pratt, director of communications for Gun Owners of America. “The administration has been in many ways trying to slice and dice our rights from us. This was another attempt at doing so.”

The federal government’s attempt to start a shotgun import ban while imposing new registration requirements on handguns and long-barreled rifles near international borders have all come without congressional approval under the Obama administration.

“The administration has tried various arguments for nickel and diming us,” Pratt said.
 

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Good, go get them. Wyoming has a keeper in her.
 

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Good for her, I hope she succeeds! I would love more to flood the market... bring the price down and make it cheap enough for me to justify to the wife! :D :D
 
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Converting a Garand or M1 Carbine to FA is a cop-out. Neither was either designed or built that way.
 

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"Previously the Obama administration blocked these guns from being re-imported because they could be used to commit crimes."

How dumb is obama anyway???
Aren't ALL rifles a miniscule percentage of guns used in crimes?
(Rhetorical question)

If they do get that many imported, I would guess the price would be affordable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Converting a Garand or M1 Carbine to FA is a cop-out. Neither was either designed or built that way.
There was a FA version of the carbine, designated M-2, and then the IR sighted version the M-3.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M-1_carbine#Carbine.2C_Cal_.30.2C_M2

Carbine, Cal .30, M2 M2 Carbine, note: the selector lever on the left side, opposite of the bolt handle.

1024px-US_M2_Carbine.jpg






  • Early 1945
  • Selective fire (capable of fully automatic fire)
  • 30-round magazine
  • About 600,000 produced
Initially, the M1 carbine was intended to have a selective-fire capability, but the decision was made to put the M1 into production without this feature. Fully automatic capability was incorporated into the design of the M2 (an improved, selective-fire version of the M1), introduced in 1944. The M2 had a revised wood stock and featured the late M1 improvements to rear sight, a bayonet lug, and other minor changes.


Although some carbines were marked at the factory as M2, the only significant difference between an M1 and M2 carbine is the fire control group. The military issued field conversion kits (T17 and T18) to convert an M1 to an M2. Legally a carbine marked M2 is always a machine gun for national firearms registry purposes.


Other changes developed for the M2 were a 30 round magazine with three catch nibs (as opposed to two on the fifteen round magazine); and a magazine catch with a third retaining surface. These M2 parts including the heavier M2 stock were standardized for arsenal rebuild of M1 and M1A1 carbines.

M2CarbineGTAPage3.jpg
 

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I carried both the M1 and the M1 Carbine plus the 1911 plus the 1911A1 during my days of the wearing of the green and the bright rank and shoulder patches.

I even got to shoot an M2 Carbine, but they were not regular issue!!!!
 

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I hope they are brought back so we can afford to have one..
 

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FOLLOW UP ARTICLE:
Lummis wants M1 rifles to get import OK

Lummis wants M1 rifles to get import OK

June 06, 2013 8:00 am • By KYLE ROERINK Star-Tribune staff writer



The U.S. State Department has barred South Korea from selling nearly 1 million antique guns to eager U.S. collectors and enthusiasts.

Rep. Cynthia Lummis, R-Wyo., wants to change that.


On Tuesday she introduced a bill in Congress that would lift a nearly three-year ban imposed by the Obama administration that blocked imports of M1 rifles made in the U.S. and shipped overseas during the Korean War.


The guns, once standard issue for U.S. soldiers, would arrive back in the U.S. and be sold to civilian marksmanship programs that would then distribute them to individual buyers.


Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms rules usually allow guns older than 50 years to be imported into the country. But because the guns were given to South Korea during the war, State Department permission is required, according to ATF guidelines.


“It’s disappointing that legislation is even necessary to allow U.S. citizens to access perfectly legal and regulated firearms, in this case storied, U.S.-made rifles that are pieces of U.S. military history,” Lummis said in a press release on Wednesday. “This is a political stunt on the part of the State Department, pure and simple, while denying the exercise of Second Amendment rights by law-abiding citizens, firearm collectors, and competitive marksman. The State Department has no business blocking domestic firearm ownership; they are way out of bounds and my legislation will put them back in their place.”


The State Department didn’t respond to Star-Tribune requests for comment.


The stockpile is sought after by gun enthusiasts and veterans across the country. The weapons are used for marksmanship competitions and military ceremonies.


This isn’t the first time South Korea’s offered to sell the guns. The Reagan Administration allowed 200,000 M1 rifles from South Korea to be sold in the U.S. in 1987. In 2010, South Korea offered to sell back 87,310 M1 “Garand” rifles and 770,160 M1 carbines. The State Department initially gave the OK to South Korea, but then reversed its decision.


Lummis sponsored similar legislation in 2010 with Sen. John Tester, D-Mont. The State Department publicly stated it wouldn’t lift the ban because it said the guns could be used for “illicit purposes.”


For Lummis and Tester that wasn’t enough.


The two wrote the department a letter to demand a better explanation. There were worries from the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms, the White House and the Justice Department that the M1 carbine could be “converted into a fully automatic rifle,” according to a letter sent to Lummis from the State Department two years ago.


The Lummis and Tester legislation failed. The State Department hinted it would have let the M1 Garands enter the country in late 2011, but the deal never panned out.


Gun-rights advocates claim the ban is just one more push by the federal government to impede the Second Amendment.

“There is a fear of average people owning guns,” said Erich Pratt, director of communications for Gun Owners of America. “The administration has been in many ways trying to slice and dice our rights from us. This was another attempt at doing so.”

The federal government’s attempt to start a shotgun import ban while imposing new registration requirements on handguns and long-barreled rifles near international borders have all come without congressional approval under the Obama administration.

“The administration has tried various arguments for nickel and diming us,” Pratt said.
Would love another Garand.
 

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The ARVIN's had the M-2's in Nam....

1 pow-flag.gif
 
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For those too young to know, ARVN - Army of the Republic of VietNam.
The South Vietnamese soldiers.

EDIT: Per TA. NOT the bad guys. Soldiers that fought with the Americans.

Bad Guys - NVA - North Vietnamese Army
 

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For those too young to know, ARVN - Army of the Republic of VietNam.
The South Vietnamese soldiers.
You should also note, not the bad guys! :D
 
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