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I've been shooting my Heritage 3.5" Bird's Head some more today. The ejector housing screw came out when was on my ATV out back. I found the housing, rod, even the spring, but I'm missing the screw. So, I shot the gun without the ejector and, I believe the thing is easier to load by removing the cylinder just like I do on my NAA mini revolvers and punching out the rounds with the center pin. Actually, you can shake the cylinder down real hard and 3 to 5 cases will usually extract themselves. :D Then, I was loading the cylinder out of the gun and putting the cylinder back in. Just seems a LOT faster. :D I MIGHT try this with my blackhawks, though my .45 Colt blackhawk is usually pretty fast to unload with the cylinder in the gun since the brass weighs enough it usually comes out of its own weight. :D

Just an observation. I'll probably put the ejector housing back on the gun when I can get a screw as I think it looks better with it, but I might just keep reloading the cylinder out of the gun. Only thing that sorta worries me about that is that there might be a bit more wear on parts like the hand, though it doesn't seem like it, And, heck, NAAs are reloaded this way by design. :D
 

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This IS exactly why more gun owners need to be knowledgeable in how their firearms actually function. So they can work around perceived (and actual) shortcomings before beginning to whine the old “woe, despair and agony on me” which oftentimes leads to brand bashing and gripes about customer support!
 

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SA's require one to check the screws after cleaning/shooting to make sure they are tight. They all have a tendency to loosen rather easily.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
SA's require one to check the screws after cleaning/shooting to make sure they are tight. They all have a tendency to loosen rather easily.
I own 3 blackhawks and haven't had the problem. I did have a pin on my new 9mm/.357 flat top convertible that seems to drift out. I loctited THAT. But, this little .22 needs a bit of help from Loctite. The screw on the grip got loose and the one holding the front of the trigger guard got loose. Loctite works. :D
 

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Yup, I check the screws before and during each match anymore as I have lost screws and rendered guns worthless.... ( lever screw on my 1894 Marlin Cowboy)
 
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I just noticed one of the frame screws on my Blackhawk is missing. :( Never had that problem in the years I've owned it, but sure enough it's missing.
Now to find one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I just noticed one of the frame screws on my Blackhawk is missing. :( Never had that problem in the years I've owned it, but sure enough it's missing.
Now to find one.
Email Ruger. They'll send you one free and it won't take long, either. :D
 
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Email Ruger. They'll send you one free and it won't take long, either. :D
and don't forget there is the ever popular Duct Tape and Super Glue if you can't get a screw from Ruger!!!----
 
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SA's require one to check the screws after cleaning/shooting to make sure they are tight. They all have a tendency to loosen rather easily.
I wish I had been warned years ago. It's apparently a problem I didn't know about but I've never had a problem.
 

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It would be nice to have a spare cylinder for quicker reloads. I always had a soft spot for SA revolvers. I've owned quite a few over the years, but at the moment just a .45 colt Bisley and a .44 special, both Rugers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have three BP cylinders and a .45acp conversion for my Pietta 58 Remington. It reloads fast that way.
 
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I have had that happen to me.. I used red loctite on the screw and so far, it hasn't backed out on me yet.

If swapping out the cylinders work for you, go for it. I don't think I have the hand dexterity to pull it off on a consistent basis. I am trying to learn to use speed strips as demonstrated by Fortunecookie45lc.


Anyway, seems more consistent for MY hands.
 

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and don't forget there is the ever popular Duct Tape and Super Glue if you can't get a screw from Ruger!!!----
You forgot the third party of the triumvirate, baling wire.

I never had any screws loose (well, on the revolver, anyway) after firing my Super Blackhawk .44 magnum, but it's certainly something I'll keep in mind.
 

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There are also pull pin double action revolvers. I have a 1896 ish H&RcNew American Double Action chambered in .44Bulldog that has a loading gate but no ejector. Unless you carry something to kick out the empties, pulling the cylinder and using the base pin is the only way to reload it.

H&R made pull pin s all the way up to the '70's.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I have had that happen to me.. I used red loctite on the screw and so far, it hasn't backed out on me yet.

If swapping out the cylinders work for you, go for it. I don't think I have the hand dexterity to pull it off on a consistent basis. I am trying to learn to use speed strips as demonstrated by Fortunecookie45lc.

Anyway, seems more consistent for MY hands.
I hope you never ever need to remove that screw for any reason. You might as well weld it as use RED loctite. I stick with the blue, myself. :D
 
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When I read the packages, it said for threads... who knew?

Ah well... I didn't want it backing out again, so maybe a good thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The red sets up and removing the screw, while not impossible, is quite tough to do. You could strip the head of the screw and not get it out. Blue keeps it from succumbing to vibration and other stresses, yet you can break the screw loose if need be. I never use the red, only the blue. I've used the stuff for years on some hard shaking motorcycle racing engines with success.
 
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Ejector rods are a sore spot with me. They aren't long enough. Now I understand they make them to fit the 4 5/8" barrel and then use the same one on longer barrels. But for the longer barrels a longer ejector rod would keep you from having to pluck the empties from the cylinder. It's be nice if they were actually fully ejected.

I discovered that Ruger did make a longer on for a couple of models. My gunsmith said he could do it. So I ordered one. Turns out it won't work. The longer one is for a straight barrel and my Blackhawk has a tapered barrel. If it was mounted the angle is all wrong, and it strikes the chamber wall towards the rear. It would eject cases, but probably break in short order from being bent. I'd have to re-barrel the gun to get it to work. So that project is on the back burner.
 

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I would rather keep all the parts on the gun. I do not want to be in the woods shooting and drop the pin. I can spin the cylinder with my left hand and work the ejector rod with my right hand rather quickly and get all the shells out in 6 seconds. Then it doesn't take long to load it up and shoot, and there is no chance of dropping a part and rendering the gun useless.

it takes some dexterity and coordination but speed reloading a single action revolver is fun to me.
 

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I find it very easy and fast to reload my single actions with these flat, long extra cylinders that I use!
 

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