Taurus Firearm Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone help me out - I'm looking for specific reload data for 115 grain Hornady FMJ RN bullets and using Titegroup powder. Specifically min & max recommended loads and OAL info.

My Lyman book does not include FMJ RN Hornady

Thanks in advance

Terry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
969 Posts
They did, however, load the 115 gr. XTP. If you were looking at a Hornady manual, the data would be the same for the 115 gr. XTP, FMJ or HAP.

Just to be sure you get the data, Lyman loaded from 4.0 - 4.5 grs. of Titegroup. The Max charge shows velocity at 1119 FPS. The 4.0 gr. load chrono'd 1046 FPS with the lower pressure of 27,100 CUP while the SAAMI Max Average Pressure, MAP, for the 9 x 19mm is 33,000 CUP.

Titegroup is one of the hottest burning handgun powders you can use. If it were me, I'd use the start or a lower charge and as you use it up, consider a powder better suited to the performance you want. I would not use TiteGroup for cast lead or poly-coated. There has been a recent development with 2 powders made specifically to be poly-coated friendly. Alliant Sport Pistol and WIN W244. Very well suited to target and competition loads. For defense applications, Ramshot Silhouette is about as good as it gets and has a flash suppressant in its chemistry. Been using it in my 9mm defense loads for some years now. Hodgdon CFE Pistol is similar, and V-V 3N37 if you have it. You may not like its price if you don't. And of course, Ramshot True Blue makes for great loads at a number of different velocity levels. I use it for accuracy loads and it comes by low flash naturally since it's very dense and very fine grained. Meters like fine hourglass sand. Its uniformity is unrivaled.;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
969 Posts
Can anyone help me out - I'm looking for specific reload data for 115 grain Hornady FMJ RN bullets and using Titegroup powder. Specifically min & max recommended loads and OAL info.

My Lyman book does not include FMJ RN Hornady

Thanks in advance

Terry
Checked that with older Hornady data before there was a TiteGroup. They used 1.105" for the 115 gr. FMJ. I'd consider that as Minimum OACL; you can load longer if you like. Kind of depends on the pistol and how it's throated, i.e. chamber length. There is an easy way to find the best OACL using jacketed bullets. I gave instructions on how to do that here: http://blog.westernpowders.com/2019/01/and-now-for-something-completely-different/ I used JHPs, but it's the same for 9mm FMJ. Basically, it's for determining where the bullets ogive contacts the Leade/Rifling in the barrel.

I should have also mentioned AA #2. I worked up a load for gun games and 130 PF. I am able to load the RMR 124 gr. JHP longer for my Canik TP9sa then will work in other 9mm pistols. With 4.2 grs, CCI-500 and an OACL of 1.132"/28.75mm, 10 rounds averaged 1028 FPS with an extreme spread of 12 and a very low Standard Deviation of only 3 FPS. Very accurate, very soft shooting. I know that a lot of the USPSA guys think that 147s are softer shooting at 130 PF. Don't know how someone would need something with lighter "perceived" recoil than the load I just described. For loads at 1.122"/28.5mm OACL, the Everglades 124 gr. JHP V2 also shoots great with the same charge but velocity dropped to 1010 FPS. a slight powder charge increase should make it a great comp load. With my RMR load at 1028 FPS, rather than increase the powder charge to 4.3 grs. of AA #2, I'm gonna try shortening the load first to 1.122"/28.5mm. The ogive is closer to the nose and that may still be too long for some 9mm pistols. There is certainly no rule that you need to load them as long as I do. Another bullet that similarly has a longer shank, the Sierra 125 gr. JHP is loaded by Sierra and Lyman at 1.075".;)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Yissnakk

·
Registered
Joined
·
579 Posts
They did, however, load the 115 gr. XTP. If you were looking at a Hornady manual, the data would be the same for the 115 gr. XTP, FMJ or HAP.

Just to be sure you get the data, Lyman loaded from 4.0 - 4.5 grs. of Titegroup. The Max charge shows velocity at 1119 FPS. The 4.0 gr. load chrono'd 1046 FPS with the lower pressure of 27,100 CUP while the SAAMI Max Average Pressure, MAP, for the 9 x 19mm is 33,000 CUP.

Titegroup is one of the hottest burning handgun powders you can use. If it were me, I'd use the start or a lower charge and as you use it up, consider a powder better suited to the performance you want. I would not use TiteGroup for cast lead or poly-coated. There has been a recent development with 2 powders made specifically to be poly-coated friendly. Alliant Sport Pistol and WIN W244. Very well suited to target and competition loads. For defense applications, Ramshot Silhouette is about as good as it gets and has a flash suppressant in its chemistry. Been using it in my 9mm defense loads for some years now. Hodgdon CFE Pistol is similar, and V-V 3N37 if you have it. You may not like its price if you don't. And of course, Ramshot True Blue makes for great loads at a number of different velocity levels. I use it for accuracy loads and it comes by low flash naturally since it's very dense and very fine grained. Meters like fine hourglass sand. Its uniformity is unrivaled.;)
Is there a specific reason why you would not use titegroup with lead or poly coat other than its fast burning ability? I have a full lbs looking at me lol for some reason on all the research I did prior to buying my reloading stuff lots of people recommended it as a good beginner powder. I am eager to try out all my cfe pistol rounds next range trip to see the difference between hp-38.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
969 Posts
Is there a specific reason why you would not use titegroup with lead or poly coat other than its fast burning ability? I have a full lbs looking at me lol for some reason on all the research I did prior to buying my reloading stuff lots of people recommended it as a good beginner powder. I am eager to try out all my cfe pistol rounds next range trip to see the difference between hp-38.
As your loads get higher in pressure using TiteGroup, the burn temps increase dramatically. A ballistics program like Quik Load can give you those temps. When you see guys that are loading cast bullets over TiteGroup, like say 147 gr. Cast in 9mm competition loads, and they mention the loads being smoky, that may be due to lead being burned at the heel of the bullet. With poly-coating it can melt the coating off the bullet.

That's not to say that TiteGroup doesn't have its uses. I remember when it was introduced, or maybe reintroduced from a previous WIN powder, its selling point was that it's not powder position sensitive. So, if I had some to burn up, I'd use it in lower pressure rounds like .38 Sp. and .45 ACP Target loads at or just above start charges.

As far as good powders for beginners, I always try to recommend something that gives at least 50% case-fill. Then, if a double-charge occurred, it would be very difficult to miss in viewing the charged cases that we should all do.

It probably ain't no secret that there aren't many handgun cartridges a new handloader wants to make where I wouldn't recommend True Blue. It is extremely dense and fine grained. So, at 50% case-fill, if a double-charge occurred, you wouldn't even be able to seat the bullet. The uniformity of metering True Blue is like few other powders. AA #5 & #7 are similar in density and physical size, but they don't share the same kind of pressure stability.

Some years ago a fellow handloader on another forum quoted Richard LEE is stating that spherical handgun powders should not be compressed. There are a number of opinions he held that I do not agree with. Furthermore, if the only handload manual you have is from LEE, you definitely need more manuals. A powder like AA #7 can get you 100% load density, and sometimes even be slightly compressed. Dense sphericals are not easy to compress in the first place. But, there is a benefit in that so long as you know that you're loading to an acceptable pressure level. By using a spherical powder that doesn't want to compress, also means that the bullet can not set back during cycling. Flake powders compress far more easily. That combined with the fact that few double-based flake powders are as pressure stable as double-based sphericals had me go exclusively to spherical, or ball-type powders better desribed as flattened sphericals. In the case of True Blue, I don't know of any handgun powder type that has greater pressure stability. And if one wanted to investigate that, look at the lowest pressure cartridges like .38 S&W or .44 Special up to the highest, still being .454 Casull so far as I know at 65,000 PSI, and it may help to better understand.;)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Yissnakk
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top