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I was just watching a video on TA of a young lady shooting at a range. I noticed a sign posted in each lane saying "No Rapid Fire"
Why would this be?
I have never used a range as I live in a rural area and have my own area set up for firearms use.
Also any time I have been off premises shooting it has always been at some ones private range.

THANX RICH

People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!

 

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The range that I usually go to has the same sign now, but there are bullet holes in things that should not have them too and I think that is why....

1.1 USA.gif
 

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I think it has to do with public appearance, slow fire target shooting is for hunting and rapid fire is for combat training.

Maybe insurance regulations and range safety come into play since it is harder to control a rapid fire or full auto weapon.
 

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The range i go to doesn't have any signs against rapid fire, just no full autos. However they do enforce the 3 rounds in long guns, 6 rounds in handguns rule pretty strictly.
 

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In a word, cowboys. I don't like the rule, but from a safety standpoint I understand it. Outdoor ranges in populated areas are often very concerned about keeping all rounds below the berm. An inexperienced person shooting rapid fire is often unable to hit the target, and many rounds go high. Not to mention associated problems like losing control and dropping the gun. Judging by the bullet holes in the cover, the baffles above the target positions, and the assorted support posts, I understand why this is necessary. Large public ranges attract all sorts. Many highly inexperienced.
 

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I shoot at two indoor ranges.
One insists on three seconds between shots. The other allows rapid fire but if the rangemaster considers you not in full control of your weapon, you must stop.
 

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Before I left San Diego, I would sometimes shoot at the SDPD range. They would get on the PA and yell at u if u were shooting too fast saying "controlled fire only"..funny all my rounds were in the target :)
 

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The indoor range I frequent is strict about their posted "no rapid fire" policy. I suppose it keeps their liability insurance premiums manageable. The policy doesn't define rapid fire; it appears to mean whatever the RO decides. I've watched the RO end shooters' sessions for it. I keep telling myself I need to set up an outdoor range of my own - I just have to follow through.
 

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In a word, cowboys. I don't like the rule, but from a safety standpoint I understand it. Outdoor ranges in populated areas are often very concerned about keeping all rounds below the berm. An inexperienced person shooting rapid fire is often unable to hit the target, and many rounds go high. Not to mention associated problems like losing control and dropping the gun. Judging by the bullet holes in the cover, the baffles above the target positions, and the assorted support posts, I understand why this is necessary. Large public ranges attract all sorts. Many highly inexperienced.
Do you really want to be standing next to a range ranger blasting away as fast as he can pull the trigger, knowing that you can catch a riccoche at any moment, because his rounds are going everywhere except to the target.
 

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The word is safety CJS3 and glenwolde are right. Many people do not have the experience to shoot rapid fire and it would not be hard to hurt someone. Most ranges do not want to become known as the place that killed the noob.
 

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Speaking candidly I never minded that rule.

For one when I shoot I shoot to hit what I aim at. I am not at the skill level to rip off a magazine of 17 rounds at speed and hit anything near my target, and thus I do not try to. It is no major inconvienience to take my time at the range as in a life or death situation the last thing I wish to do is 'spray and pray'.

All rapid fire does is serve to waste ammunition. Do not get me wrong, it is fun to just blast 30 rounds of 9mm through a 30 round magazine as fast as you can controllably shoot it, but all it takes is one undisciplined fool with a Glock who's watched too much of Raylan Givens to cause an incident that shuts down the range for good. Either someone gets injured and sues the range out of business, or said moron puts a round into a baffle causing a ricochet .
 

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The only local range has a pretty lenient policy on rapid firing. It's small enough that the owners know just about everyone that frequents there anyways. They did get kinda mad when my friend took his AK and fired off 50 rounds with his slide fire stock
 

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Out of the three ranges I use only one restricts rapid fire and that’s the one that doesn’t require membership. Judging from the folks shooting there and the holes in the roof, I can understand the policy.

My favorite is the FOP outdoor range. Membership is required, have a current CCW or be an LEO and be sponsored by a current member.

Sometimes I get to shoot the LEO's evil black toys but I’m not allowed to rock n roll with them. However, nothing against pushing the fun lever as fast as I can. :)
 

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My only experience with auto fire was behind a .30 cal machine gun at a Navy installation. There were bout fifteen of us being exposed to automatic fire. They hooked me up and allowed me one pull. Most of the few rounds went higher and higher. The gunner's only comment was, "Next."
 
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At the range at the gun store where I purchase from is the same way, no rapid fire. But, there is also a sign stating that it is some kind of a township ordnance and that the police will ticket you for rapid fire.
 

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Very nice thread and many good posts to go along with it.

Now I'll give you the perspective from someone who is employed at a range. Our range has members, but is also open to the general public.

Our Range Rules mandates no rapid fire. Double and triple taps are considered rapid fire. We allow Class III full-auto fire. Does that sound contradictory?

Most of our reasons for No Rapid Fire have already been touched upon in the previous posts of this thread. I'd like to add the problem with squib loads. Squib loads can happen to anybody, no matter the experience level. Novice shooters lack the awareness and experience to know that something is wrong and to stop firing.

Experienced shooters, a majority of our members, have the required level of awareness and experience to prevent the disastrous effects of a shooting again after a squib load. Members are allowed to rapid fire. Our members have reached a certain level of maturity that doesn't require us to babysit them. With most of our members, the cost of ammo really adds up over the course of a year, so they curtail their use of throwing $$$ away and instead use ammo more purposefully. Slow fire, along with double and triple taps make up of the majority of their shooting.

Most Class III owners I've met have the experience to know how to operate a firearm safely. Also, most full-auto firearms are designed and built to either withstand the blast or at the very least prevent harm to the operator. This is a very expensive hobby and out of reach of most folks.

We value our members. The members, especially the long-term ones, are our bread and butter. We don't burden our members with rules that are aimed more toward novices and idiots.
 

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The two indoor ranges and the three outdoor ranges I have shoot at all have no signs prohibiting rapid fire and all of them hold competitive matches, which include timed and rapid fire strings, but these matches limit strings to five shots each.

Regarding control during rapid fire I have shot with at least three fellows who used two targets ( one for each five shot string in each course of fire ) who usually shot nearly a one hole group using a 45 Auto. Their Slow and timed fire strings were almost always one hole groups. Had they used a single target for the ten round rely you could not have found all ten holes. So skill level does make a BIG DIFFERENCE!

The all wore Distinguished Master medals!

Regarding full auto fire some of us were firing familarization in the military with bi-pod mounted machine guns and we had to change barells every few minutes using heat resistant gloves, if you didn't and kept firing you would see your rounds dropping lower as the barell got hot and started to droop.

So much for the movies where a person would fire forever with a machine gun!:)
 

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It is a safety issue, they dont want "run aways" when some dummy that doesnt know how to control themselves or their weapon. A range in my area has a sign that says 1 second between each shot, and it is stricly enforced.

Also someone stated there are bullet holes where there shouldnt be, whats up with that?! There are always holes in things that are aimed right into the sky, I have never understood how you could miss so badly.
 

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One indoor range allows it but they rent full auto rifles and handguns. The other two ranges don't. The out door range put the sign up after a guy shot a power wire down and the other indoor range is brand new and is vary well maintained and has strict rules that they enforce vary rigidly.

Just to note the one that does is shot to pieces. Hanging wires and busted lamps and ventilation.
 
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