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Discussion Starter #1
I took a new-to-me S&W 27-2 (in virtually like new condition) to the range and had a lock up.

Couldn't move the hammer or trigger. Did a little light pushing and pulling for about 20 seconds and it got back to normal.

I'm no expert, and I've mostly shot pistols over the last few years, but I wonder if a lock up can be user-induced by going a little forward and back movement with the trigger during the pulling or releasing of the trigger...which I think occurred.

After the lock up, I made sure there were no variations in when pulling the trigger. I've shot about 150 rounds through it, and this has been the only issue.

TIA!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Snooping around the net, I found this comment (from a user on a forum - I added the bolds):

"One thing that I have found that causes cylinder lock up is back traveling a double action trigger pull. Once you begin a double action trigger pull you can stop, and freeze at any point along the cycle, continue to increase pull and stop again and again but never go backwards or let the the trigger back travel once you have started a pull. You must complete the cycle or you can and will experience a frozen or misaligned lockwork of the revolver. I have learned this the hard way particulerly with S&W revolvers."

And mine is a S&W :)
 

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You found your answer! Yes this can happen and why I hate the myth that revolvers are more reliable. There is that one spot that will advance the cylinder and lock up the works if you release it. My LCRx is the easiest to find that spot. If you have to stop the double action motion, reach up and pull the hammer back to full cock and gently lower the hammer manually. The action is still advanced, but you can open the cylinder and place the chamber back to where it is next.

In some ways, it is like short stroking a pump gun.

Maloy
 

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Take the side-plate off and cycle the action both single and double. Make sure the hand is correctly installed and not jumping forward. This happened to me long ago with a S&W Model 19.
 

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You found your answer! Yes this can happen and why I hate the myth that revolvers are more reliable.
I agree. I've seen revolvers lock up because of proud primers, I've had a Ruger revolver become virtually impossible to use because the ejection rod was unscrewing itself, and I've seen a well-maintained .357 toss it's barrel downrange because the frame decided to take the day off. I've had a revolver come out of the box with the trigger return bar and spring not connected. All of them were fixable, but none of them were fixable as quickly as I can clear a semiauto, and half the revolver issues required tools. And "half" doesn't include the downrange disassembly event.

Revolvers have pros and cons, just like semiautos. But the reliability benefits of a revolver get overstated at times.
 

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The only cylinder lock-up I personally have experienced has been with Smith's. I have a 29 that every time I would shoot mags it would lock up. Specials did fine. It seems to me the cylinder lock is pretty small on there revolvers. I've wondered if that has anything to do with it. If you compare the cylinder lock on a J frame with a 500 mag. it's almost the same size.
 

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I had a S&W 625 in .45acp that I shot IDPA with and it would lock up at times. Until that is, I found out that the ejector rod was unscrewing itself under recoil. A little blue locktite cured the problem.
 
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