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Discussion Starter #1
Guy's, I'm not up on revolvers as I am a Winchester/Marlin Collector,but I do carry a Taurus 85SS as my Hand Carry gun.

I do have a question for those of you that are in the know.

Can this revolver be discharged if it were to be dropped?

I've wondered about this for some time and thought I would post the question.

Thanks in advance for your imput.

djh
 

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Do you mean will it accidentally discharge when dropped? No. The new Taurus revolvers have the Ruger like transfer bar system. Unless the trigger is fully retracted to the rear, the hammer cannot contact the firing pin and the firing pin has insufficient mass to cause its inertia, alone, to make the gun fire. Same can be said for a Ruger. The older Taurus actions of the 80s had a hammer block system like the Smith and Wessons, but with the Ruger like frame mounted firing pin. Unless the trigger were fully retracted, there is a hammer block keeping the hammer from contacting the firing pin. Again, not enough mass in the firing pin to cause it to cause a discharge. Revolvers are some of the safest firearms you can carry. Not only are they drop safe, they're DA and you can just look at the side of one to tell it's loaded, the ultimate loaded chamber indicator.
 

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Try this: Open and UNLOAD the cylinder. Leave the cylinder open. Thumb-cock the hammer. Holding the hammer back with your thumb, slowly pull the trigger. You should be able to see the transfer bar come into the firing position at the last part of the trigger pull under the hammer.
The hammer hits the transfer bock, it hits the pin, thus the term "transfer" block.
I don't have a Taurus , but that's the theory. That's what my revo does.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes, I do mean and accidental discharge if dropped.

I checked my Taurus the way you suggested but with the cylinder open you cannot pull the trigger back, it is locked in place.

With the cylinder closed, It appears to me as the hammer is moved toward the cocked position a bar is raised in front of the firing pin and when the trigger is pulled the hammer contacts the bar which in turn hits the firing pin but with the hammer resting at the firing pin the bar is retracted down and the hammer is resting on the firing pin.

It appears to me that if the gun was dropped and it was to hit the floor on the end of the hammer, the hammer would contact the firing pin and the gun would discharge inless the transfer bar in its down position blocks the hammer from going any futher towards the firing pin.

My Model 85SS was made in 1994 if that helps. That's before they came out with the new safety system.

djh
 

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It appears to me that if the gun was dropped and it was to hit the floor on the end of the hammer, the hammer would contact the firing pin and the gun would discharge inless the transfer bar in its down position blocks the hammer from going any futher towards the firing pin.
Nope, don't work that way. Either the gun has a transfer bar that moved up to allow the hammer, through the transfer bar (called a transfer bar because it transfers the energy of the hammer to the firing pin) to the firing pin. When the trigger is released, you'll notice the firing pin retracts. This is because the transfer bar retracts. If the transfer bar is retracted, the upper part of the hammer hits the metal of the frame and cannot contact the firing pin. You can pound on it with all your force, don't care if you're Hulk Hogan, with a 20 pound sledge and the gun ain't goin' off no way no how.

If it's an older gun, it may have a hammer block. This works in reverse by BLOCKING the hammer when the trigger is released. In either case, you'll notice the firing pin retracts when the trigger is released. The transfer bar system is preferred. It is conceivable that a hammer block (never heard of such) could snap off and from there on not block the hammer. If the transfer bar was to break, fall out, be omitted on reassembly, the gun would not fire, period, case closed.
 

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Try this, load primed case (if you don't reload, get one somewhere from a friend or something) and load the weapon with a primed empty case. In fact load a couple. Cock the hammer, hold the hammer with your thumb while you pull the trigger and let the hammer just slightly forward of the sear engagement, then release the hammer with your finger OFF the trigger. It won't fire and if you open the cylinder, there will be no sign of a dent in the primer. You can whack the hammer with a mallet if you wish while the hammer is at rest and trigger released. Nothing will happen except possible damage to the gun. The primer will never fire.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
NativeTexan:

Thank you very much for your excellant explanation for my question. You made it very easy for me to understand the system and have complete confidence the gun would not discharge should I accidentley drop it and it was to fall on the Hammer.

I appreciate your taking the time to do this.

If you ever need help on a Winchester or Marlin, let me know.

djh
 
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