Taurus Firearm Forum banner
1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,547 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been looking at the PT25 and was wondering what your experiences are with it. I'd like to get one as a back up gun.
Thanks,
Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,933 Posts
No experience with it myself, but I would think it would be better than no BUG at all!
I would think engagement with a BUG would be very close range, and if you stick it in their belly and squeeze until it goes "click" it would be a fairly good deterrent.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BigBlue

·
Registered
Joined
·
30,024 Posts
Generally speaking, the .25 ACP is more reliable than a .22 rimfire in the same sized platform.

It's no powerhouse by any means, but beats a sharp stick in the "last ditch back up" role; no one wants to get shot, even with a .25 ACP.

That being said, I would carry one as a back up if I "had to".

Had to being defined as; it's all that's available, medical problems with the hand/wrist etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,098 Posts
Wow - just looked at ballistic comparisons - the 25 only makes about 60 FP of muzzle energy at 900 fps. CCI Mini Mags double that and 22 magnums easily triple it.

"any gun is better than no gun"

"shot placement is king"

There are a whole lot of very small 380s and 9mm ( my choice) available.

Do you already have the 25??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,877 Posts
Rather than get into the virtues of the .25 Auto, let's talk about the PT-25. IMO that design is on the thick side and there are many other designs in .32 Auto or .380 Auto that are much thinner. To me the thinner designs are much easier to carry concealed. Now I have not seen or handled one of the new plastic frame PT-25, but since most of the thickness of the PT-25 comes from the grips, Taurus may have addressed that issue, I don't know. But IMO the 732 and 738 are much, much easier to carry concealed, and that includes ankle, or boot, or pocket carry too.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,547 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys! Your answers and advise are just what I was looking for. I haven't bought the PT25, but was considering it as a back up to one of my standard carry guns. The kind of gun to have if I ran out of ammo or a major malfunction in my standard gun and backed into a corner. I like your ideas regarding the 732 and 738 and will look at them when I can. Not too many guns out there right now!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,061 Posts
The .22 long rifle ballistics are from a longer barrel, like 18"-24". Talk about apples and oranges.

Check this out. gunnuts.net/2007/08/21/25-acp-vs-22-lr/

The simple scientific fact is that, from a less than 3" barrel, the ballistics are quite close for both. The .25 ACP has the edge in reliability overall, though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,098 Posts
The .22 long rifle ballistics are from a longer barrel, like 18"-24". Talk about apples and oranges.

Check this out. gunnuts.net/2007/08/21/25-acp-vs-22-lr/

The simple scientific fact is that, from a less than 3" barrel, the ballistics are quite close for both. The .25 ACP has the edge in reliability overall, though.
So they are all at the lower end of the scale then! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,668 Posts
I have the the 25PLY and just bought the PT25 and have worked with the 25 ACP for all my adult life, carrying it on and of for 40 years as the situation dictates. I agree with GreenWolf, since the introduction of the sub-compact with features like a slide lock and last round shot lock, and in cartridges like the 32 ACP and 380 Auto, it makes it hard to make a case for the 25 ACP other than they reasons you just mentioned, guns and ammo. Right now, in my area, it is the only ammo on the shelf. Not even any 22 RF ammo.

I have used the 25 ACP for self defense and been shot by it. I would prefer that not happen again on either count but it made me a believer in it's use on both counts.

I've taken some comments against a statement I made about the 25PLY/PT25 but don't consider it a handgun for the someone without the physical ability to operate it's slide. The tip barrel is a feature for loading because of the significant forces needed to overcome the trigger springs, it doesn't have a recoil spring, but malfunction clearing still needs to be done with the tap, rack, flip and that "flip" is not allowing the barrel to flip up. If you become dependent on clearing the weapon with the barrel lever, sooner than later, you will "flip" the slide off the frame. I will guarantee it. For this reason my wife uses a 732 as she cannot clear the 25PLY. She is recoil sensitive and the 738 is too much for her. I have a PT132 and PT138 but she cannot operate the slide on either.

It is also a pistol that you can still find magazines for, just bought a couple two days ago. The 25PLY and PT25 use different magazines. Ross Leather has a great selection of holsters for the PT25 as well as double magazine pouches so the pistol is well accessories by them and others.

These pistols use a plastic buffer insert in the forward part of the slide. In that it doesn't have a recoil spring, it is designed to absorb the wear on the frame but it is life limited. I have never seen Taurus not have these in stock, they are a dollar each and I buy 50 at a time. I'm shooting a stout load behind my home cast bullet of my design and replace it every 250 rounds because of wear. Yes, not only do I reload for the 25 ACP but I cast bullets as well. One pound of powder will make 5380 rounds! I shoot 1.3-grains of Hodgdon's International, a shotgun powder, for 835 FPS and 74 FPE from 1 to 5 yards.

If you decide to go with one, welcome to the club!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,231 Posts
I started to tell it but may be some other time.
Not to hijack the thread.

I think we need to hear more SD stories. Personally, listening to others stories of HD and SD, help prepare the mind and keep me on alert for any situation that might arise. Granted each situation is different - but, just hearing first hand from others who made it through similar situations...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,973 Posts
I have a Raven .25 Auto, I keep it in my junk box. Personally if I could hit anything with it the best shot placement would the knee caps that should give you distance and time to get out your knife. A member of our MC was shot 5 times in the chest by his POed Ol lady with a .25 that never penetrated his leathers. You be the judge but I would recommend a more powerful caliber....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,668 Posts
Not to hijack the thread.

I think we need to hear more SD stories. Personally, listening to others stories of HD and SD, help prepare the mind and keep me on alert for any situation that might arise. Granted each situation is different - but, just hearing first hand from others who made it through similar situations...
I was just not really interested in telling it but here you go. I got shot twisting a gun out of a guy's hand. He and three others jumped me in the very early morning hours. I shot all four of them. Three with really good hits and one not so good but it achieved the purpose. By being immediately as violent as they were, I was able to break contact and flee.

Both firearms where Ravens, the same pistol gbusmech mentioned. Not so weird as many years ago it was a very popular self defense handgun. It would be about like Glock on Glock now. That does bring up a point with 25 ACP carry. My thought is most of the stuff generated by bad guys now is gang related in one way or the other and these fellows tend to buy or steal the best. I don't think you will find them with a 25 ACP, 32 ACP or 380 Auto. So, I think about that as well. The only way to gain the advantage when outgunned is through violence of action.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,757 Posts
My younger brother is a DPS Trooper, and early in his career he carried a PT25 in his boot. He had that pistol for almost 15 years, and eventually replaced it with a M85UL, which gave way to a Ruger LCP.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,877 Posts
The slide is not the only thing difficult about that design. I have an 80 year old neighbor and she is one tough old bird. A while back I noticed she had some firearms in the house, mostly from her father, and asked her if she would like me to clean them all for her as a couple of rifles are classics and were showing a good bit of dust. Among the firearms she showed me her pistols which she had purchased in her travels. There were 2, a very nice brushed stainless Charter Arms snubby (that may be the best example of this model I have ever seen) and a little .25 Auto Beretta (just like the PT-25) that she bought in France, "just because it looked so sexy". The Charter Arms snubby she has shot often and she has loaded with some good SD ammo. It is usually the one she carries around the house during the day. The Beretta had never been fired and had a box of Winchester ammo that she bought with the pistol probably 40 or so years ago.

Well to make a long story short, I cleaned everything up for her and put them back up for her. We got to talking about the pistols and she said, even though she had never shot it, the Beretta had been kept in her bed headboard loaded for many years. She has absolutely no problem loading and firing the Charter Arms snubby, but she could not operate the safety, the barrel lever, or even pull the trigger through on the Beretta and after that she told me to sell it for her. She was more than a little upset that she had kept it close to her and depended on it for all those years, but would not have been able to use it when she needed it most.

I've got to tell you that Beretta was difficult to operate period. At the time I wrote it up to being unfired and needing break in, but I think some of the actions like pulling back the slide and that safety would have never changed. Now I have a friend who carries a PT-25 full time as his only sidearm and has for many years. He is frequently in some very bad neighborhoods and has complete confidence in that pistol. But IMO, it is very thick for for concealed carry and there are much thinner options on the market irregardless of caliber.

BTW, RanchDog is correct in that reloading with the .25 Auto (and .32 Auto too) is the way to go. The rounds you can buy on the market seem very under powered to me from a pressure stand point. If you have a quality pistol, preferably not a blow back, but a locked breech design, you should be able to get a good bit more power out of those rounds and still stay under max SAMMI pressures. I don't know much about cast lead bullet designs but RanchDog's designs have a good rep from what I've heard and Speer has a 35 grain Gold Dot out for the .25 Auto. It would be interesting to see how copper bullets perform in the little .25 Auto and I would expect those to appear sooner or later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,049 Posts
I'd venture to say that just about anything would be good for a BUG, as long as it has a decent bite to it! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,061 Posts
The slide on a Beretta 950 has always been harder to manipulate than many other guns. It is a minimalist design, so the recoil spring must make up for a lack of slide weight. There is also a minimal gripping area as well. The gun was designed to be operated by slapping in a loaded magazine, then tipping up the barrel, and loading a round into the chamber. After that, pull back on the hammer, and apply the safety. Unless you are field-stripping the gun, there is no manipulation of the slide.

I am unaware of any popular .25 ACP guns that were locked-breech designs.

My personal opinion would be that the years of just sitting had allowed a new gun's lubricants to congeal, causing much of the problem with trigger, safety, and tip-up latch. MY personal Model 950BS has a safety that is positive, but easily worked, a tip-up latch that is the same, and a trigger that runs about six pounds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,877 Posts
Issues with the little Beretta were still there after a thorough cleaning, so old lube was not a problem. For a design with minimal gripping area it has grips as thick as a Glock. A jammed round still requires slide manipulation, unless you intend to carry loose rounds, or even worse jack a round out of the mag, to quickly reload if you have a dud round. I have no intention of arguing the merits of the design, I'm just telling you that an 80 year old woman, who has absolutely no issues pulling a Charter Arms .38SPL snubby's trigger through DA and manipulating the cylinder release, could not push the Beretta off safe, throw the barrel release lever, or pull the trigger through DA.

There seem to be plenty of locked breech designs in .32 Auto. I don't really follow the .25 Auto design scene. Blow back designs for concealed carry don't handle close to max SAMMI pressure very well since the design depends on mass of the slide for proper function.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top