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Discussion Starter #1
Had a bad day at the range the other day. My PT1911 was shooting really well the entire time. I was nearing the 500th round for the gun and it froze up. Action would not go into battery and the slide just would not move. I took it home and some hard tugging managed to move the action.

This has never happened to me before. What could have caused it?

I was really disappointed because the accuracy on this thing is so great.
 

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How well lubed was the gun? Also, what type of lube are you using? And what type(s) of ammo were you using? Plus, any idea how many rounds since you had cleaned the gun (I'm not knocking you if you hadn't cleaned it yet as I like to know that my guns will run dirty if needed)?

If the gun is on the tight end of the specs I could see a build-up of crap retarding the action, especially if it was running low on lube.

Steelheart
 

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I normally use Rem Oil to lube my gun and I clean it after every visit to the range. I wasn't planning to clean it after this visit because much like you, I like knowing that I can count on my gun clean or dirty.

I was shooting reloads I bought from a reputable local company. The stuff has worked fine in every other gun I have ever used it in. In fact, my girlfriend put a couple of hundred rounds of their 9mm through my CZ without a problem.

I broke it down after the failure and could find nothing really wrong with it. Still a mystery.
 

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Reloads and lead bullets can dirty up the action. Remember the PT1911 is a tight action. The original 1911A1 is intentionally loose, but in order to enhance the accuracy, understand the tolerances must be tighter. This certainly sounds like a lube issue and may not happen again if lubed adequately? Doesn't sound like a crisis... just a matter of TLC
 

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Didn't say whether it froze while chambering a round or not? Cimarron is right, reloads with cast bullets make lotsa gunk. People I shoot with throat their barrels specifically to deal with this over couple hundred round sessions at shoots. If you get too much buildup just at the end of the chamber, as the round travels in it gets progressively tighter till all is wedged like a safe, whether its all the way to battery or not. If this is the problem 5-6 dry passes with a brass brush every hundred rounds or so should help.

Just be careful not to get too much lube on your baby before it goes to the range. Too much lube and some oils will collect grime and grit faster than too little lubrication. Lubriplate and gun butter are good for slides and barrels, and Liquid Wrench (SMALL squirt) to the hammer/ sear assembly. Blow out excess.

PS- no matter how reputable a company is, when reloading an error is ALWAYS possible. Visually check each round before loading.
 

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That sounds like it was a bit dirty or a swelled round. Did you examine the rd? Exactly how far did the rd chamber before sticking?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The round chambered almost the entire way. To me that would indicate build up in the chamber. I cleaned it a good bit and will try to get it out sometime this week and run some ammo through it. Law school started today and my time is being eaten by the federal tax code and rules of evidence.
 

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Did you examine the rd that jambed? What type and or brand of ammo was it? Be nice to know for future reference.
 

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Sounds like you're going to want to make it out to the range for some relaxation after that fun week.

Something you could try at home. Disassemble the gun and remove the barrel. With just the barrel in your hands (rest of the gun on the table etc) chamber a round from that same batch. If it seems to slide in nicely you should be fine. I think the base of the cartridge should be flush with the top of the barrel (with the bottom being the link). Now, its been a while since I did this with a 1911 so if I'm off here I'm sure someone will give the correct answer.

This procedure should be totally safe as there is no firing mechanism near the chambered round to ignite it. Once you are done, please double check that you removed the live round and re-assemble the pistol. Yes, it is normal for a 1911 to have a section of un-supported case by the feed ramp.

Steelheart
 

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Steelheart said:
Sounds like you're going to want to make it out to the range for some relaxation after that fun week.

Something you could try at home. Disassemble the gun and remove the barrel. With just the barrel in your hands (rest of the gun on the table etc) chamber a round from that same batch. If it seems to slide in nicely you should be fine. I think the base of the cartridge should be flush with the top of the barrel (with the bottom being the link). Now, its been a while since I did this with a 1911 so if I'm off here I'm sure someone will give the correct answer.

This procedure should be totally safe as there is no firing mechanism near the chambered round to ignite it. Once you are done, please double check that you removed the live round and re-assemble the pistol. Yes, it is normal for a 1911 to have a section of un-supported case by the feed ramp.

Steelheart


Excellent idea!!!
 

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Here is a picture of the proper position of a bullet in the chamber...



Wilson combat makes a tool for cleaning the chamber... http://www.wilsoncombat.com/a_chamber_cleaning_tool.asp



Powder residue, lead and bullet lubrication can get packed in your barrel's chamber, which can cause feeding and extraction malfunctions. Unfortunately, your .45 bore brush is the wrong diameter and usually too soft to remove chamber contamination. You need a Wilson "Chamber Cleaning Tool". This tough little tool has a sturdy Delrin handle and very stiff stainless bristles to thoroughly clean your chamber. If you own a .45, you need this little tool.
I am seriously considering getting one of these since I reload and shoot a lot of LSWC. They shoot fine, but they do leave a residue... as much from the bullet lube as from the lead itself.

Good luck!
 

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Many Manufacturers recommend against any Stainless Steel brushes as they will put deep scratches in your barrel, and that is my opinion, as well. (Learned that the hard way on my late SigArms P220's original factory barrel. Expensive replacement!)

I've used Noxon7 Metal Polish/Cleaner, available at any good hardware store, to completely remove the Lead/Lube Residue completely from Pistol Barrels, when using cast bullets. I simply use thick patchs soaked with it over a regular Nylon Bore Brush and it gets the chamber, too! Removes Copper Residue as well, as there's plenty of Ammonia in it! Great for Rifles!

Remove residual Noxon7 from your barrel with a Patch soaked with water, then run dry patches thru the barrel. Non-Chlorinated Disc Brake Cleaner is optional for the Drying Patches.

For an excellent Lubricant that will stay with your gun thru prolonged shooting sessions, any detergent grade straight 30W Motor Oil will do very nicely. For cold climate use, Mobil 1 10w30 works very well. You'll get better mileage too! ;D Seriously, don't knock them till you've tried them!
 
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