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I have been thinking about buying a PT1911 SS (probably in 9mm). It would be my first 1911 style pistol, and I have some concern about the outside safety lever brushing against something and accidently being moved to the "Fire" position while the gun is being carried cocked and locked in my holster. Is this a valid concern, or am I just being too Namby-Pamby?
 

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no others have the same concern, you can replace the safety with a right handed (left side only)saftey. i did, just preference i diddn't like the big ambi saftey, but like everthing else about the pistol.
 

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That actually happened with one of my PT1911's on a couple of occasions.
I seldom carry my 1911's but do on occasion.
the one item that i do not like on the Pt1911 is those huge bat winged extended ambi safties (now of course I am right handed too)
, but I find them to easy to knock off for on.
so i normally replace them with a single side safety as in the pictures below.
Now there are other 1911's that have the single safety and that could be a consideration , but a single side safety cost generally in the 25-35 dollar area, and if you can't install it then a gunsmith will get another 25-35 bucks to do it for you.
 

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I have been thinking about buying a PT1911 SS (probably in 9mm). It would be my first 1911 style pistol, and I have some concern about the outside safety lever brushing against something and accidently being moved to the "Fire" position while the gun is being carried cocked and locked in my holster. Is this a valid concern, or am I just being too Namby-Pamby?
It's something that isn't for everybody, and some people have to work their way up to the mindset. The nice thing about the 1911 is that if the thumb safety works itself to the fire position, you still have the grip safety that will keep you 'safe'. When I carry OWB, I occasionally check with my thumb to be sure the safety hasn't moved. Done properly, you can do this and nobody is any the wiser.
 
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Even without the thumb safety you still have the grip safety and the trigger which have to be activated for the shot to be fired. While we can't carry here, many of those who do carry their 1911 use a holster with a thumb break or retention strap that blocks the hammer.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
I should have mentioned that I am left handed so I would have to remove the safety on the left side if I did not want the ambi safety.
 

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There are also those who prefer to carry the 1911 with out a round being chambered. True it does take a second or so to chamber a round, but many who do it feel better about the extra safety behind the mindset.
 

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I should have mentioned that I am left handed so I would have to remove the safety on the left side if I did not want the ambi safety.
HMMM! wrong handed and don't like an ambi safety on a 1911???
man talk about having bad luck, i mean really , really bad luck!
so how long do you think its going to take you to get use to those ambi safeties??-LOL
With practice i guess you could get use to using your left thumb to knock off a single safety by reaching around the gun but man that seems awkwrd to me.
I think that greenwolf guy is wong handed and perhaps he will be here in a while to give you some advice.
 

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I'm with those that say you still have the grip safety.
 

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I think that a left handed shooter that carries there 1911 in a holster will probably use a left handed holster so a safety will always be exposed and they will not be able to address this problem by using a left side thumb safety, but rather by either using a strapped holster or replacing the ambi thumb safety with a lower profiled ambi safety.
 

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Big fan of the 1911 platform here, while I do not carry one, they where built with the purpose to carry cocked, locked, and ready to rock!
It's a very hard pistol to fire "accidentally", even if it does come off safety there is still the grip safety and the trigger before it'll fire, all hard to do while still holstered.

That being said, you still have the option of having one in the pipe and the hammer on half cock, it can not fire this way, even with the safety off, beaver tail engaged, and the trigger pulled, then if and when the situation presents itself, just pull the hammer back and let em fly.
 

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As long as the grip safety isn't being pushed on, you shouldn't be able to depress the trigger to get the hammer to drop. Unless you have a severely worn sear and disconnecter, which would be hazardous in any gun. Plus the PT1911 is a Series 80, which also has a firing pin block to minimize the chance of a negligent discharge.
 

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while I agree with what you folks are saying, the thing about the 1911 is that all the safeties except the thumb safety are designed to be disengaged when the weapon fits into the hand, such as drawing the weapon from a holster.
the thumb safety is typically disengaged after draw and when coming on target.
so if the thumb safety is disengaeged then one can lose a toe or 2 if if not very careful.
and yes we all should not place or bugger pickers on the trigger before we intend to fire, but honestly how many people have shot themselves in the foot with a 1911 upon drawing the weapon?
 

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That being said, you still have the option of having one in the pipe and the hammer on half cock, it can not fire this way, even with the safety off, beaver tail engaged, and the trigger pulled, then if and when the situation presents itself, just pull the hammer back and let em fly.
with all due respect the half cock is not a safety device for carry, it is designed to catch the hammer in the event that hammer follow occurs to keep the weapon from chain firing, half cocks can be sheared easily and damage to the sear can also occur from carrying a 1911 in this fashion.
 

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with all due respect the half cock is not a safety device for carry, it is designed to catch the hammer in the event that hammer follow occurs to keep the weapon from chain firing, half cocks can be sheared easily and damage to the sear can also occur from carrying a 1911 in this fashion.
Fact:

The (captive) half-cock was and is a safety, by design and intent. It's referred to as a safety position in the original 1910 patents by the man himself. With the later addition of the thumb safety...aka "Manual slide-locking" safety...the use of the half-cock as a safety was made irrelevant...but it still functions as a safety.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/14652685/US-Patent-984519-Colt-1911

page 7 paragragh 10
 

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Fact:

The (captive) half-cock was and is a safety, by design and intent. It's referred to as a safety position in the original 1910 patents by the man himself. With the later addition of the thumb safety...aka "Manual slide-locking" safety...the use of the half-cock as a safety was made irrelevant...but it still functions as a safety.
US Patent 984519 - Colt 1911
page 7 paragragh 10
OK, just to cut this short before a 25 page arguement/debate about how anyones great grand father did something for 80 yeras and it worked!!
just to make a point--Mine and this is from mainly 1 manual, actually it is repeated in about all manuals of the 1911 regardless of manufacture but I will refer to the Taurus manual as this is the weapon in question i believe.
page 18.
Intercept notch (also known as half cock NOTCH) The intercept notch is a notch on the hammer which prevents it from falling fully forward in the event of the primry sear notch failure, It also prevents the hammer from from hitting the firing pin should your finger slip from the slide or hammer while cocking the pistol, Provided the hammer has moved past the stop.
The interceptor notch is NOT a manual safety!
Do NOT under any circumstance use the interceptor notch as a half cock position.
This misuse can result in damage to the sear and or unintentional discharge of the pistol.
The intercept notch is an automatically engaging safety feature and SHOULD NEVER be engaged by hand.
all rebuttals should be forwarded to either Clarence or his cousin Terrance at Taurus Manufatcuring.
hope this clarifies it a bit.
 
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Fact:

The (captive) half-cock was and is a safety, by design and intent. It's referred to as a safety position in the original 1910 patents by the man himself. With the later addition of the thumb safety...aka "Manual slide-locking" safety...the use of the half-cock as a safety was made irrelevant...but it still functions as a safety.
US Patent 984519 - Colt 1911
page 7 paragragh 10
OK, not even going to start down this road!
just to make a point--Mine and this is from mainly 1 manual, actually it is repeated in about all manuals of the 1911 regardless of manufacture but I will refer to the Taurus manual as this is the weapon in question i believe.
page 18.
Intercept notch (also known as half cock NOTCH) The intercept notch is a notch on the hammer which prevents it from falling fully forward in the event of the primry sear notch failure, It also prevents the hammer from from hitting the firing pin should you finger slip from the slide or hammer while cocking the pistol, Provided the hammer has moved past the stop.
The interceptor notch is NOT a manual safety!
Do NOT under any circumstance use the interceptor notch as a half cock position.
This misuse can result in damage to the sear and or unintentional discharge of the pistol.
The intercept notch is an automatically engaging safety feature and SHOULD NEVER be engaged by hand.
all rebuttals should be forwarded to either Clarence or his cousin Terrance at Taurus Manufatcuring.
hope this clarifies it a bit.
 

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I spent so much time carrying a M1911A1 in a tanker holster that I just got used to carrying it at the half cock rather than cocked and locked. Even now that I have ambi safeties on both my 1911's I find I still tend to carry it at the half cock out of habit. I can usually thumb it to full cock about as fast as I can flip the safety off. I have never really thought about covering the safety because I don't usually carry it that way. I guess it's just bad habits developed from living in a right handed world.

I have an old friend, who is a retired police detective and a retired lawyer, and he just went through a second bout with cancer. The doctors had told him it was terminal and I think he had resigned himself to it. He went through his gun collection and put the ones he want to pass down to his grandchild and sold the rest. He is also left handed and gave me (since I'm left handed too) a bunch of really nice leather holsters and gunbelts. Well one of them looks like it is for a 1911, but it always seemed to leave to much room under the strap when I put my PT-1911 in it. Then one day after staring at it for a while, I put that 1911 on cocked and locked and now the holster fits perfect. The retention strap goes directly over the hammer and grip safety holding both until released. A big duh moment for me.

My friend by the way, is doing fine. His wife refused to accept the diagnosis and took him to Vanderbilt hospital for another opinion. Now 4 months and a new round of chemo-therapy later he is cancer free again. He is buying guns again and I've been wondering if he'll ask for those holsters back. I'd give them right back, I'd rather have an old friend around any day.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks to all who responded to my query. After physically handling a 1911 (not a Taurus) at my LGS, I have decided that a 1911 does not appear to be the gun for me.
 

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OK, just to cut this short before a 25 page arguement/debate about how anyones great grand father did something for 80 yeras and it worked!!
just to make a point--Mine and this is from mainly 1 manual, actually it is repeated in about all manuals of the 1911 regardless of manufacture but I will refer to the Taurus manual as this is the weapon in question i believe.
page 18.
Intercept notch (also known as half cock NOTCH) The intercept notch is a notch on the hammer which prevents it from falling fully forward in the event of the primry sear notch failure, It also prevents the hammer from from hitting the firing pin should your finger slip from the slide or hammer while cocking the pistol, Provided the hammer has moved past the stop.
The interceptor notch is NOT a manual safety!
Do NOT under any circumstance use the interceptor notch as a half cock position.
This misuse can result in damage to the sear and or unintentional discharge of the pistol.
The intercept notch is an automatically engaging safety feature and SHOULD NEVER be engaged by hand.
all rebuttals should be forwarded to either Clarence or his cousin Terrance at Taurus Manufatcuring.
hope this clarifies it a bit.
Blasphemy Blasphemy No respect LOL
 
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