Taurus Firearm Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,463 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Lots of people sneer at making mods to a $200 gun: "If you're going to pay more, then pay it up front."

The G2 has a combination of the features I want that unavailable on other guns, which make it worth owning for me at any price. And my motto is: "If it's worth owning, it's worth customizing."

So I've got Lakeline SS springs and fiber optics on my G2 guns. And I've just recently tried a new trigger.

I went carefully by the inventor's install instructions. There are some things to be careful of. I've never really done any significant gun work before, but this was easy enough (I have done a lot of auto work, though, including engine overhauls).

One thing: You can order a pack of 250 chromed 2.5mm ball bearings from Amazon for $8.50. Don't ask me why I know that.

A disappointment is that the trigger is polymer (like the original) dyed black, but it's only surface dyed, not "dyed in the mass," so if you try to do any custom shaping, you'll cut through the dye layer and reveal white polymer underneath. Don't ask me why I know that.

Something else that may or may not become a disappointment is that the OEM trigger (which is polymer) has a metal sleeve bearing where it surrounds its main pivot pin. This replacement trigger has no bearing. I'm not sure how much of an issue that is, because the ends of the pin itself actually rest loosely in its mount on either side, so it should be free to turn--there really shouldn't need to be any movement of the trigger around the pin.

There are several styles of replacement triggers available from this inventor on his eBay sight that offer straight, slightly curved, and full curved triggers with two amounts of pull length. The finish matches the finish of the polymer gun frame.

I chose a conventionally (full) curved trigger with the greater amount of pull (which also leaves more space for a gloved finger).

Differences from the OEM trigger:

1. SAO. Not a big loss for me because I won't intentionally pull again on a round I realize is bad, I'll tap and rack. In my experience, a bad round won't change its ways with a second strike.
2. No trigger-momentum safety. Maybe this means if I drop it on its butt in just the right way with the thumb safety off, it'll go fire. OTOH, I no longer have to worry about that trigger safety breaking, which seems to be more likely to happen.
3. Half as much trigger pull (in SA, of course). A big complaint with the trigger is that it pulls sooooo far back before it hits its wall, and then soooo far back before it releases. This trigger has less than half as much free travel before it hits the wall, and then breaks about twice as far from the rear of the trigger guard.
4. A very wide, flat face. The full trigger width is really the same as the OEM trigger, but because it's flat face rather than rounded and because it doesn't have the safety lever in the middle, it really feels like a big shelf under your finger.

Basically, it would have taken me about two hours initially, watching the video carefully for each step, except for a ball bearing issue. If I had to do it again, it would take less than an hour. Re-installing the tiny trigger spring is a bit trying.

Tools: Some old drill bits to punch out the drift pins, a tack hammer, a pair of small needle-nosed pliers, a small hooked scribe tool, a small magnetic parts pan. I used a block of wood as an anvil to drive out the pins--solid, yet won't scar the gun. Also, I'd pre-drilled 1/4-inch holes in the wood to put below the pins so that as I pounded them out, they had somewhere to go.

Now, about that 2.5mm ball bearing. That's the bearing that rides the detents in the thumb safety. When I first reassembled the gun, it got out of place in some way and the safety didn't move correctly. When I took it apart again, the bearing ran away and hid from me, that treacherous rebel scum. Use a tiny dab of grease to hold the blighter in place. That was the only mishap I had with the process. I have two more guns, so I may use a couple more out of that bag before I'm done.

How did it feel and shoot? Pretty darned good. That wide flat trigger has a unique feel. The closes thing to that wide shelf I've ever felt before has been some revolvers that have a wide trigger to soften and control a heavy pull. It seems to do the same here, as well--it makes the pull weight feel less. For sure, it was more comfortable to shoot with after a couple of hundred rounds. I thought the edge would bother me, but it didn't.

Although I'd learned to like the long pull all the way back of the OEM trigger, it was sure easy to get back used to a short pull again. The face of the trigger fell naturally right under the pad of my first digit.

I will outfit my other guns with this trigger.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/PT111-G2-G...e=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649


Trigger Replacement crop.jpg
 

·
Supporting Moderator
Joined
·
5,350 Posts
I have one on mine, works great!!!
 

·
Supporting Moderator
Joined
·
5,350 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Black sharpie marker works well to touch up spots if you wear through the black.

RIT fabric dye probably works too, I have seen several other people use that to successfully dye nylon gun parts, but have not tried it yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,229 Posts
I have the same trigger on my G2 and 709. This is an outstanding upgrade. If you can change the oil on your Grandma's Geo Metro, you can do this. Very worthwhile!
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
149 Posts
They are professionally 3D printed, that is what allows me to make them in several different styles with the complex convex shapes they have and keep them so light, which is what keeps the gun drop safe.

I wouldnt mind having them made via nylon injection molding or aluminum fabrication if I could keep the designs as they are, but I have not found any good companies that do small batches for reasonable prices. If anyone has any recommendations on that, I am more than willing to check them out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,830 Posts
I was curious looking at the finish. I've been dealing with some end user products and testing viability for commercial sale. I'm a machinist by trade, but on the side, I've had some involvement in plastic injection molding and MIM.

Thanks,

Maloy

They are professionally 3D printed, that is what allows me to make them in several different styles with the complex convex shapes they have and keep them so light, which is what keeps the gun drop safe.

I wouldnt mind having them made via nylon injection molding or aluminum fabrication if I could keep the designs as they are, but I have not found any good companies that do small batches for reasonable prices. If anyone has any recommendations on that, I am more than willing to check them out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,463 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Addendum:

I've installed the trigger on my other two G2 pistols. Got it down to thirty minutes on the third one.

One continued issue is the fact that the middle frame drift pin of the gun is an odd diameter. You want to use a pin punch that's exactly the same diameter as the pin. You don't want one even the tiniest bit too large or it will hog out the hole and the pin won't hold.

The diameter of the pin is rather analogous to the amount of grip force it has. Big pin, lots of grip, hard to hammer out, thin pin, less grip, easier to hammer out.

But if you have to use a punch 'way too small, the thin punch can't take the amount of hammering that the thicker pin needs to push it out.

That middle pin on the G2 just a smidge is too narrow for a 3/32 punch, and 'way too large for 1/16. And there isn't a metric size that fits it correctly either.

Basically, I had to mistreat 1/16 devices, which was a frustration with all three guns. Be prepared to break or bend some 1/16 drill bits or punches.

Other than that, I'm happy with this trigger on all three guns.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Taurus1965

·
Registered
Joined
·
452 Posts
The trigger safety issue is freaking me out. Maybe the G2C addresses the problem. I can tell by reading Ralph Kirk's description that I would not even attempt the change myself. I have never changed oil in a car. I am a banker by trade for god's sake! LOL My PT140 has some sort of burr somewhere in the trigger mechanism, the gun fires fine now but the trigger used to catch on something and not fire, also, the trigger safety, if I lean a little too much on angle on the trigger it will not pull. Just sent my PT111 to Taurus today due to light strikes. Thanks for letting my ramble!
-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,091 Posts
Addendum:

I've installed the trigger on my other two G2 pistols. Got it down to thirty minutes on the third one.

One continued issue is the fact that the middle frame drift pin of the gun is an odd diameter. You want to use a pin punch that's exactly the same diameter as the pin. You don't want one even the tiniest bit too large or it will hog out the hole and the pin won't hold.

The diameter of the pin is rather analogous to the amount of grip force it has. Big pin, lots of grip, hard to hammer out, thin pin, less grip, easier to hammer out.

But if you have to use a punch 'way too small, the thin punch can't take the amount of hammering that the thicker pin needs to push it out.

That middle pin on the G2 just a smidge is too narrow for a 3/32 punch, and 'way too large for 1/16. And there isn't a metric size that fits it correctly either.

Basically, I had to mistreat 1/16 devices, which was a frustration with all three guns. Be prepared to break or bend some 1/16 drill bits or punches.

Other than that, I'm happy with this trigger on all three guns.
Would definitely agree on that one middle pin. Had to give it several whack's with the hammer to get it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,229 Posts
FYI...The pins are removed going from right to left and installed in reverse order. There is one pin that defies removal if you try to remove it going from left to right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
I was curious looking at the finish. I've been dealing with some end user products and testing viability for commercial sale. I'm a machinist by trade, but on the side, I've had some involvement in plastic injection molding and MIM.

Thanks,

Maloy

I would very much like a version of this made in aluminum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,356 Posts
you all need to STOP I keep kicking myself off the trail of the G-2 because of the trigger you keep showing me end runs around my wife will have me strung up by the T`s not necessarily tongue, toes or teeth by use of fish hooks, staples, rusty nails and duct tape or any combination there of...HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
149 Posts
I would very much like a version of this made in aluminum.
Aluminum looks nicer, but good nylon is far more durable and forgiving, especially when dealing with thin parts. Aluminum breaks or bends and stays there, nylon bends and snaps right back.

I have dropped my PT111 G2 backwards from a height of 4-5 feet onto concrete 40+ times doing drop testing, and the back of the nylon frame is barely scuffed where it hits the ground, and the frame elsewhere is fine, no bends or cracks. I would bet every dime I have that an exact copy of the frame made of even a high grade aluminum would not have held up nearly so well.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top