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Discussion Starter #1
I just got a PT111 G2 and was cleaning up the factory lube in the striker channel, but wanted to clean up some other areas, too. I studied the schematic and figured out how to remove the extractor and striker block. It's really not that difficult. This would also apply to the PT140 G2. If anyone is interested on how to do this, I can post some photos or maybe put together a video.
 

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The G2 comes apart the same as the PT709, so you can just go to youtube and find several video's.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The G2 striker comes out the same as the PT709, but not the extractor. The PT111 G2 does not have an extractor pin that protrudes from the rear of the slide like the PT709 - it's totally different.
 

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I just got a PT111 G2 and was cleaning up the factory lube in the striker channel, but wanted to clean up some other areas, too. I studied the schematic and figured out how to remove the extractor and striker block. It's really not that difficult. This would also apply to the PT140 G2. If anyone is interested on how to do this, I can post some photos or maybe put together a video.
A video would be great. Thanks for offering.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
It might be a few days before I can put a video together, so I will post a few pics for now.
The secret to removing the extractor and striker block is this piece, which Taurus calls the "extractor axle". I call it the "extractor retainer". It is a spring loaded part that holds the extractor in place:
DSC_5779-2.jpg
First, remove the striker assembly. It comes out just like a Glock striker. With a punch or small screwdriver, Push the firing pin sleeve down towards the striker channel. That frees it up from the rear slide cap. While holding it down, slide the rear slide cap off:
DSC_5778-1.jpg
DSC_5780.jpg
Now, hold the slide in your hand with you thumb over the extractor. This is so you won't lose it when you release it:
DSC_5781.jpg
While holding the slide, with a small punch, push down on the extractor axle or retainer. You will hear and feel when the extractor releases from it. The extractor also holds the striker block in place, so it must be removed before you can remove the striker block. Here is what you will wind up with:
DSC_5783.jpg
From left to right - extractor and spring, extractor retainer and spring, striker block and spring.

Reassembly is pretty much the reverse, but it is a little trickier. Springs are small, so don't lose anything. I will show it in more detail when I put the video together.
 

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I must have not pushed down hard enough or had the right size punch. I tried that a few times before I gave up. The extractor has never failed on me so I never bothered to try again. Now, I've got to try that. :) Thanks for making a video!
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Shoop, it does take a little bit of force to push the retainer down, but not overly so. You should also push on the extractor with your thumb to relieve some of the pressure on the retainer. I used a 3/32" punch.
 

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Shoop, it does take a little bit of force to push the retainer down, but not overly so. You should also push on the extractor with your thumb to relieve some of the pressure on the retainer. I used a 3/32" punch.
Well, I was definitely using the wrong size punch... it came out so easy I felt a bit sheepish. Oh well, live and learn! Thanks again for telling us about it! Lot's of packing grease was still in there but it's now replaced with the FL of course. The extractor moves so much easier now and doesn't seem to be marring my brass as much as it was.

Getting it back in wasn't even that hard, you just get the retainer pushed down, slide the extractor in until it's half over the retainer and then I used a small flathead to push it the rest of the way down while thumbing the extractor in. Popped right in first time. I can see why this shouldn't be covered in the warranty because you could lose springs, but I still don't get why you can't remove your own striker under warranty. Lawyers probably.

Is it 10AM? Oops, better get to work lol!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You can also just use Gun Scrubber and you don't need to disassemble the gun.
Probably true, but I doubt that the GS will totally clean the nooks and crannies of the striker block and behind the extractor. If you choose not to take it apart, fine. I'm just putting this out there for people that have inquired about it in past posts. It's not that hard to do and you can get those areas really clean as there is quite a bit of factory grease gunk in there.
 

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Probably true, but I doubt that the GS will totally clean the nooks and crannies of the striker block and behind the extractor. If you choose not to take it apart, fine. I'm just putting this out there for people that have inquired about it in past posts. It's not that hard to do and you can get those areas really clean as there is quite a bit of factory grease gunk in there.
Thanks for the extractor disassembly info. I have stoned off material from the extractor stop to allow more movement and replaced the original extractor spring with one of lighter weight. (cut CZ 75 spring) Now the extractor will move to better allow rounds to slide up the breechface and has provided 100% function using a variety of bullet shapes and OAL. Hope this helps those of you having ammo related gags.
 

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Thanks for the extractor removal info!!! It's much appreciated! I'm now in the process of "Action Magic II"-application/treatment on this and other 'wear' type parts.
 

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I just found this thread and a thank you randyr5. As there is little, that I found, on the correct steps to remove extractor this should be a sticky. Before I shoot a new weapon I clean, lube and look it over. After the first range trip, weather I have a problem or not, I like to check the extractor out. To clean and polish all areas of movement. I kinda thought these were the the steps from the parts illustration but as the saying goes "A little knowledge can be dangerous" I would rather have it confirmed before I start. Thanks again.
 

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It might be a few days before I can put a video together, so I will post a few pics for now.
The secret to removing the extractor and striker block is this piece, which Beretta calls the "extractor axle". I call it the "extractor retainer". It is a spring loaded part that holds the extractor in place:
View attachment 101810
First, remove the striker assembly. It comes out just like a Glock striker. With a punch or small screwdriver, Push the firing pin sleeve down towards the striker channel. That frees it up from the rear slide cap. While holding it down, slide the rear slide cap off:
View attachment 101811
View attachment 101812
Now, hold the slide in your hand with you thumb over the extractor. This is so you won't lose it when you release it:
View attachment 101813
While holding the slide, with a small punch, push down on the extractor axle or retainer. You will hear and feel when the extractor releases from it. The extractor also holds the striker block in place, so it must be removed before you can remove the striker block. Here is what you will wind up with:
View attachment 101814
From left to right - extractor and spring, extractor retainer and spring, striker block and spring.

Reassembly is pretty much the reverse, but it is a little trickier. Springs are small, so don't lose anything. I will show it in more detail when I put the video together.
Thanks for your photos.

Disassembly was fairly easy. Had a tough time getting back together though. Think it will be easier next time as I know what I am doing now.

Thank God that I was able to find the extractor axle compression spring after it flew across the room.

WARNING! Watch for springs that love to fly out....
 

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Thanks for your photos.

Disassembly was fairly easy. Had a tough time getting back together though. Think it will be easier next time as I know what I am doing now.

Thank God that I was able to find the extractor axle compression spring after it flew across the room.

WARNING! Watch for springs that love to fly out....
Easy trick to avoid losing them. Get a clear plastic bag or plain plastic shopping bag and while holding the slide inside the bag, take the extractor retainer loose.
If parts go flying, the bag retains them.
 
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